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Pvt Elijah Alverson

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Pvt Elijah Alverson

Birth
Fairfax County, Virginia, USA
Death 23 May 1857 (aged 93)
White County, Tennessee, USA
Burial White County, Tennessee, USA
Memorial ID 57143033 View Source
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*** Served in The Revolutionary War, Pvt. under Capt Sanford in Virginia ***

Married twice 1) Hattie Hames or Ames 2) Wina Couch on May 27, 1827. Children with both wives: 12 with first wife and 5 with 2nd wife

All of his children with 1st wife were born in SC

Southern Campaign Pension Application
ion Pension Statements & Rosters
Pension Application of Elijah Alverson W10365 Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris
State of Tennessee } S.S.
White County } On this 15th day of April 1834 personally appeared in open Court before the Justices of the Court of pleas and quarter sessions for said County, now sitting, Elijah Alverson (sometimes written Albertson, and frequently pronounced Albison) a resident of the County of White and State of Tennessee aforesaid, aged seventy years, who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth on his Oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.
That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated.
1st To the best of his recollection, he entered the service at, or near about, the commencement of the autumn, in the year 1780. He then resided in the County of Fairfax, in the state of Virginia. He was drafted, and served as a private for three months, in the Company Commanded by Captain Sanford. His subaltern officers, attached to the Company to which he belonged, he does not recollect.
From Colchester in Fairfax, the troops to which he was attached, went to Dumfries, where they remained a short time, drew some provisions, and marched from there to Fredericksburg: where they remained about three weeks. (He begs leave here to state, that on reflection, he remembers the name of his Lieutenant. It was Archibald Johnson.) He states, that while they remained at Fredericksburg, the enemy was daily and hourly expected, but did not come: although he was near at hand. From Fredericksburg, they were ordered to Williamsburg, where they remained, according to his recollection, a few days over three weeks; they were then required to go, with all possible expedition, to a place called "the halfway-house" [between Hampton and Yorktown], which he thinks was about twenty five miles from Williamsburg, and still further down the Country. At this latter place he remained, until his term of three months expired. He not not receive any written discharge, but had permission to return home, which he accordingly did. This Declarant was very young, and does not remember to what Regiment, brigade or Division he belonged, during this tour of duty.
2nd His second tour was six months, and on this occasion he volunteered. His residence was still in Fairfax: He cannot remember with certainty the name of his Captain, but believes it was George Rearden. He cannot give with accuracy, the date of the commencement of his second engagement, nor can he definitely say, what was the interval between the expiration of his first term, and his entering upon the one which immediately followed it; but he does remember, that his time of service was near about to expire, or had expired, at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis [19 Oct 1781].
He will now give as much as he can recollect, of his movements and the duties he was called on to perform, during his second tour. From Colchester, he went to Alexandria, where he remained a considerable time; how long, he cannot say: but was very often engaged in scouting parties, and endeavoring to watch the movements, and counter act the operations of similar parties of the Enemy. After the British left Alexandria, he returned to Colchester, where he was again frequently engaged in scouting parties, performing nearly the same round of duties as had been performed at Alexandria. On the expiration of this, his second and last tour of duty, he has no recollection of having received a formal, or written discharge. He states that the troops to which he was attached were "disbanded," or dismissed, and their services no longer required.
Thus terminated his services, comprising in all, Nine months, for which he respectfully asks a pension. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state. He knows of no living witness by

whom he can prove his service
Answers to the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department, and propounded by the Court.
1st According to information, he was born in Fairfax County Virginia on the 8th day of March 1864.
2. He has, at this time, no record of his age.
3. When called into service, he lived in Fairfax County Va. subsequ[continued on next page]ently he
removed to Caswell Co. ND. from there to Uniton District S.C. from there to Spartanberg [sic:
Spartanburg] S.C. & from there to White County Tennessee.
4. When called into service the first time he was drafted. The second time, he Volunteered.
5. He cannot state the names of any of the Regular officers with certainty: Nor can he be more special,
than he has already been, in giving "the General Circumstances of his service."
6. He never received any written discharge.
7. He refers to the following persons to whom he is known in his present neighborhood and who can
testify as to his character for veracity, and their belief of his services as a soldier of the Revolution. Viz: Captain George Cline, John Wallis Esq'r. David Mitchell Esq'r., William Bruster Esq'r. Jabez G. Mitchell David L. Mitchell Sheriff of White County. Elijah hisXmark Alverson
STATE OF TENNESSEE—COUNTY OF White
On this 2nd day of January A.D. one thousand eight hundred and fifty one personally appeared
before me, a Justice of the Peace, within and for the County and State aforesaid Elijah Alverson aged Eighty eight years, a resident of White County in the State of Tennessee, who being duly sworn according to law, declares, that he is the identical Elijah Alverson who was a Private in the Company commanded by Captain John Sanford in the Third Regiment of Virginia Regular Soldiers [see endnote] commanded by General Weden [sic: George Weedon] in the war of the Revolution that he Enlisted in Colcester Town 18 miles from Alexandria Va on or about the [blank] day of [blank] A.D. 17[illegible] for the term of dureing the War and continued in actual service in said war for the term of Eleven months and was honorably discharged at Halfway house 25 miles below Little York [Yorktown] on the [blank] day of [blank] A.D. 17— at the Expiration of the Revolutionary War, that he has never recd any land from the United States & has lost his discharge
He makes this declaration for the purpose of obtaining the bounty land to which he may be entitled under the "act granting bounty land to certain officers and soldiers who have been engaged in the military service of the United States," passed September 28th, 1850, or any other act of Congress allowing Land to Revolutionary Soldiers that his name was placed upon the Pension Roll at Washington City on the 12th May 1834 Elijah hisXmark Alverson
NOTES:
In his application for a pension, Alverson did not claim service as a regular (i.e. Continental) soldier,
but only as a militiaman.
Alverson's age was given as 93 on another application for bounty land dated 31 Mar 1855.
On 3 Aug 1857 Wina Alverson, 46, applied for a pension stating that as Wina Couch she married
Elijah Alverson about 27 May 1827, and he died on 23 May 1857. William S. Morgan deposed that he had known Elijah and Winney Alverson before he married them as a Justice of the Peace about 1829 in Spartanburg District SC. On 5 Mar 1866 Wina Alverson, 55, applied for a restoration of her pension, which had been suspended during the Civil War, during which time she supported herself "by her own labor." Her application was denied, whereupon she made an amended application with the following statement: "Her means of subsistance was by her own labor & that of her Daughters upon a small Dower she lives upon, she had her own wood to cut, & her corn to raise." An accompanying deposition stated that "all of her sons, who went into the Army, volunteered in the United States Service," and that those three were her only sons. On 5 Oct 1868 she applied for an increase in the restored pension.


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