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 Robert Lynn Batts

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Robert Lynn Batts

Birth
Bastrop, Bastrop County, Texas, USA
Death
19 May 1935 (aged 70)
Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA
Burial
Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA
Plot
Section 1, Lot 118
Memorial ID
56889463 View Source

Bio provided by Deb:

Source: A HISTORY OF TEXAS AND TEXANS

Rorert Lynn Batts, of the law firm of Gregory, Batts & Brooks, has, since locating in Austin in 1900, gained a reputation as one of the most forceful members of the local bar, and has few peers throughout the state. His clear, analytical mind affords him unusual facility in working out the details of a case, and his contemporaries are quick to acknowledge his special abilities and his high position among the lawyers of Texas. He is a native son of the Lone Star state, having been born at Bastrop, November 1, 1864, his parents being Andrew Jackson and Julia (Rice) Batts.

Andrew Jackson Batts was a native of Virginia, and a descendant of one of the very earliest Colonial families of the Old Dominion. In 1857 he sought the West and

located at Bastrop, where he was residing at the time of the outbreak of the war between the states, throughout which he participated as a soldier in the Confederate army. With the fall of the Lost Cause he returned to Bastrop and here rounded out a useful and successful career, passing away in 1890. He was married in Texas to Miss Julia Rice, who was born in Alabama, and came to Texas as an infant with her parents in 1845, the family locating in Burnet county, where for years they followed agricultural pursuits.

Robert Lynn Batts was granted excellent educational facilities, and after completing the usual preparatory courses entered the University of Texas, from which institution he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1886. At that time he entered upon the practice of his chosen calling at Bastrop, and continued there until 1892, when he became assistant attorney general, under Attorney General Charles A. Culberson, now United States Senator from Texas. Mr. Batts' high accomplishments won him a full professorship when he was but thirty years of age, as a member of the law faculty of the University of Texas, a position which he held for a number of years. He took up active practice in 1900, becoming a member of the firm of Gregory & Batts, with Thomas W. Gregory, and in 1907 Victor L. Brooks was admitted to the firm, the style of which then became as now, Gregory, Batts & Brooks. This is known at this time as one of the strongest legal combinations in the state, and has been connected with numerous important cases including the noted case of the State of Texas vs. Waters-Pierce Oil Company, in which the firm represented the state. Mr. Batts is the author' of numerous articles relating to his profession, which give evidence of excellent literary ability and taste, a broad knowledge of bis calling, and a vigorous style. Among his technical works may be mentioned "Annotated Civil Statutes of Texas" and "Corporation Laws of Texas." The offices of the concern are located in the Austin National Bank Building, while Mr. Batts' home is at No. 2400 Lampasas street. He enjoys membership in the Masons, in the Odd Fellows and in the Kappa Alpha fraternity. His political affiliation is with the democratic party.

Tn 1889 Mr. Batts was married to Miss Harriet Boak, who is the daughter of the late John C. Boak, of Austin; and to this union there have been born three children, namely: Robert E. Lee, Mary and Margaret.

Bio provided by Deb:

Source: A HISTORY OF TEXAS AND TEXANS

Rorert Lynn Batts, of the law firm of Gregory, Batts & Brooks, has, since locating in Austin in 1900, gained a reputation as one of the most forceful members of the local bar, and has few peers throughout the state. His clear, analytical mind affords him unusual facility in working out the details of a case, and his contemporaries are quick to acknowledge his special abilities and his high position among the lawyers of Texas. He is a native son of the Lone Star state, having been born at Bastrop, November 1, 1864, his parents being Andrew Jackson and Julia (Rice) Batts.

Andrew Jackson Batts was a native of Virginia, and a descendant of one of the very earliest Colonial families of the Old Dominion. In 1857 he sought the West and

located at Bastrop, where he was residing at the time of the outbreak of the war between the states, throughout which he participated as a soldier in the Confederate army. With the fall of the Lost Cause he returned to Bastrop and here rounded out a useful and successful career, passing away in 1890. He was married in Texas to Miss Julia Rice, who was born in Alabama, and came to Texas as an infant with her parents in 1845, the family locating in Burnet county, where for years they followed agricultural pursuits.

Robert Lynn Batts was granted excellent educational facilities, and after completing the usual preparatory courses entered the University of Texas, from which institution he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1886. At that time he entered upon the practice of his chosen calling at Bastrop, and continued there until 1892, when he became assistant attorney general, under Attorney General Charles A. Culberson, now United States Senator from Texas. Mr. Batts' high accomplishments won him a full professorship when he was but thirty years of age, as a member of the law faculty of the University of Texas, a position which he held for a number of years. He took up active practice in 1900, becoming a member of the firm of Gregory & Batts, with Thomas W. Gregory, and in 1907 Victor L. Brooks was admitted to the firm, the style of which then became as now, Gregory, Batts & Brooks. This is known at this time as one of the strongest legal combinations in the state, and has been connected with numerous important cases including the noted case of the State of Texas vs. Waters-Pierce Oil Company, in which the firm represented the state. Mr. Batts is the author' of numerous articles relating to his profession, which give evidence of excellent literary ability and taste, a broad knowledge of bis calling, and a vigorous style. Among his technical works may be mentioned "Annotated Civil Statutes of Texas" and "Corporation Laws of Texas." The offices of the concern are located in the Austin National Bank Building, while Mr. Batts' home is at No. 2400 Lampasas street. He enjoys membership in the Masons, in the Odd Fellows and in the Kappa Alpha fraternity. His political affiliation is with the democratic party.

Tn 1889 Mr. Batts was married to Miss Harriet Boak, who is the daughter of the late John C. Boak, of Austin; and to this union there have been born three children, namely: Robert E. Lee, Mary and Margaret.


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