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PFC William Crawford Lally

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PFC William Crawford Lally

Birth
Fall River, Bristol County, Massachusetts, USA
Death
1 Jul 1943 (aged 28)
Western, Solomon Islands
Memorial Site*
Manila, Capital District, National Capital Region, Philippines

* A structure erected in honor of someone whose remains lie elsewhere.

Plot
Walls of the Missing // Missing In Action
Memorial ID
56761560 View Source

Marine Corps PFC William Crawford Lally, 28, killed in World War II, remains unaccounted-for.

In 1942, William completed boot camp at Parris Island, South Carolina.

From there, he was assigned to the following units:
1942-1942, 0311, Marine Barracks Parris Island, SC
1942-1943, 0311, 6th Barrage Balloon Sqdn (ZMQ-6), Marine Corps Barrage Balloon Group
1943-1943, 0311, 4th Raider Bn

Combat and Non-Combat Operations
1943-1943 Northern Solomon Islands Campaign (1943-44)/New Georgia Group Operation

Private First Class Lally was with his brothers in Headquarters Company of the 4th Marine Raider Battalion, 1st Marine Raider Regiment of the 1st Marine AC, Fleet Marine Force when landed on Vangunu in the Solomons.

It was July 1, 1943 that young William - just 28 years old - perished.

Sgt Edson Franklin Bellis shared on TogetherWeServed:

"U.S. Marine PFC William Crawford Lally died in the Solomon Islands during World War II, but his body was never recovered. Back in Wrentham, his parents and brother mourned.

Now, more than 70 years later, the fallen Marine's remains might have at last been found. William Lally, the Marine's nephew and namesake, recently was informed by the military that his uncle's remains likely have been found. Lally agreed to a DNA test needed to confirm the identity of the remains. "I was bowled over," said a surprised Lally, whose parents named him in honor of his father Arthur's late brother. Lally, who now lives in California, says that if the identification is confirmed, he hopes to bring his uncle's body home to be buried in Massachusetts.

A plaque in the late Marine's name is already in place at the Bourne National Cemetery on Cape Cod. Lally said he was not told anything about how his uncle's remains were unearthed, but assumes his dog tags might have been found.

Lally, 29, the first Wrentham resident to die in World War II, was killed by a Japanese sniper on Vangunu in the Solomons on July 1, 1943. His brother Arthur, who served in the Army, survived the war. Arthur has since died. William Lally was a member of the 4th Raider Battalion and was shot as he marched as part of a patrol on the Japanese-held island.

The battle for control of the Solomon Islands was one of the major campaigns of the Pacific during World War II. The Japanese wrested the islands, considered a gateway to New Guinea, from the British during the first six months of 1942. The allies launched a counterattack in August 1942, including landings at Guadalcanal and small neighboring islands. Marines and Army troops eventually retook some of the Solomons from the Japanese through a campaign of attrition, but Japanese resistance persisted until the end of the war.

Lally, a boxing enthusiast, actually tried twice to enlist in the Marines. He was turned down the first time because of dental problems, but persisted and eventually was accepted into the Corps.

Lt. Col. James Roosevelt, son of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, was Lally's commanding officer and wrote a personal letter of condolence to the marine's family.

The younger Lally said he was informed it might take six to 12 months to get a positive confirmation of his uncle's identity based on DNA evidence. Seventy-three years later, Pfc. William Crawford Lally might finally be coming home."

On January 8, 2016, Jennifer Morrison, an independent volunteer forensic genealogist, found the family of PFC Lally and put them in contact with the Marine Corps POW/MIA Section. This (re)established lines of communication with William’s family regarding the ongoing recovery and repatriation efforts, and offered his nephew the opportunity to provide a Family Reference DNA Sample, should it be necessary for William's identification.

Marine Corps Private First Class William Crawford Lally is memorialized within the Manila American Cemetery, in the Philippines. His name is permanently inscribed within of the "Walls of the Missing".

SOURCE
Marine Corps POW/MIA Section
American Battle Monuments Commission
Jennifer Morrison, independent volunteer forensic genealogist

Marine Corps PFC William Crawford Lally, 28, killed in World War II, remains unaccounted-for.

In 1942, William completed boot camp at Parris Island, South Carolina.

From there, he was assigned to the following units:
1942-1942, 0311, Marine Barracks Parris Island, SC
1942-1943, 0311, 6th Barrage Balloon Sqdn (ZMQ-6), Marine Corps Barrage Balloon Group
1943-1943, 0311, 4th Raider Bn

Combat and Non-Combat Operations
1943-1943 Northern Solomon Islands Campaign (1943-44)/New Georgia Group Operation

Private First Class Lally was with his brothers in Headquarters Company of the 4th Marine Raider Battalion, 1st Marine Raider Regiment of the 1st Marine AC, Fleet Marine Force when landed on Vangunu in the Solomons.

It was July 1, 1943 that young William - just 28 years old - perished.

Sgt Edson Franklin Bellis shared on TogetherWeServed:

"U.S. Marine PFC William Crawford Lally died in the Solomon Islands during World War II, but his body was never recovered. Back in Wrentham, his parents and brother mourned.

Now, more than 70 years later, the fallen Marine's remains might have at last been found. William Lally, the Marine's nephew and namesake, recently was informed by the military that his uncle's remains likely have been found. Lally agreed to a DNA test needed to confirm the identity of the remains. "I was bowled over," said a surprised Lally, whose parents named him in honor of his father Arthur's late brother. Lally, who now lives in California, says that if the identification is confirmed, he hopes to bring his uncle's body home to be buried in Massachusetts.

A plaque in the late Marine's name is already in place at the Bourne National Cemetery on Cape Cod. Lally said he was not told anything about how his uncle's remains were unearthed, but assumes his dog tags might have been found.

Lally, 29, the first Wrentham resident to die in World War II, was killed by a Japanese sniper on Vangunu in the Solomons on July 1, 1943. His brother Arthur, who served in the Army, survived the war. Arthur has since died. William Lally was a member of the 4th Raider Battalion and was shot as he marched as part of a patrol on the Japanese-held island.

The battle for control of the Solomon Islands was one of the major campaigns of the Pacific during World War II. The Japanese wrested the islands, considered a gateway to New Guinea, from the British during the first six months of 1942. The allies launched a counterattack in August 1942, including landings at Guadalcanal and small neighboring islands. Marines and Army troops eventually retook some of the Solomons from the Japanese through a campaign of attrition, but Japanese resistance persisted until the end of the war.

Lally, a boxing enthusiast, actually tried twice to enlist in the Marines. He was turned down the first time because of dental problems, but persisted and eventually was accepted into the Corps.

Lt. Col. James Roosevelt, son of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, was Lally's commanding officer and wrote a personal letter of condolence to the marine's family.

The younger Lally said he was informed it might take six to 12 months to get a positive confirmation of his uncle's identity based on DNA evidence. Seventy-three years later, Pfc. William Crawford Lally might finally be coming home."

On January 8, 2016, Jennifer Morrison, an independent volunteer forensic genealogist, found the family of PFC Lally and put them in contact with the Marine Corps POW/MIA Section. This (re)established lines of communication with William’s family regarding the ongoing recovery and repatriation efforts, and offered his nephew the opportunity to provide a Family Reference DNA Sample, should it be necessary for William's identification.

Marine Corps Private First Class William Crawford Lally is memorialized within the Manila American Cemetery, in the Philippines. His name is permanently inscribed within of the "Walls of the Missing".

SOURCE
Marine Corps POW/MIA Section
American Battle Monuments Commission
Jennifer Morrison, independent volunteer forensic genealogist

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  • Maintained by: JSMorrison
  • Originally Created by: War Graves
  • Added: 8 Aug 2010
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 56761560
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/56761560/william-crawford-lally: accessed ), memorial page for PFC William Crawford Lally (14 Sep 1914–1 Jul 1943), Find a Grave Memorial ID 56761560, citing Manila American Cemetery and Memorial, Manila, Capital District, National Capital Region, Philippines; Maintained by JSMorrison (contributor 47978427).