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SEC Alice J. Knight

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SEC Alice J. Knight

Birth
Natick, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
Death
21 Feb 1919 (aged 59)
France
Burial
Fere-en-Tardenois, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France
Plot
Plot C Row 10 Grave 32
Memorial ID
56638397 View Source

Alice J Knight was the youngest daughter of Dr. Elan Knight and Mary J. Cross. She was listed on the 1860 Census listed as not yet a year old living in Natick, Middlesex, MA. At first her father is listed as a Homeopathic Physician in the 1880 census, which indicates caring for spiritual needs also. However, from that point on he is only referred to as a Physician.

In newspaper accounts he is very well respected by his colleagues. He was part of a team of doctors that performed the first successful cesareans without the use of anesthesia (as it had not yet been invented) in which both the African American mother and child lived at that point of the article it had been thirty years post surgery. The Doctors all had trained and lectured in NY. Alice lived with her parents in 1880. I cannot locate her on the 1900 census.

In a 1899 newspaper account , her father is near death from typhoid fever. He is referred to as a reverend chaplain as well as a physician. he has only hours to live. However, I do not locate an actual funeral notice. In the 1900 census, his wife Mary J is a widow living with Jennie and her family. There is a burial record for Mary J in 1902 in Waterbury, CT.

She ministered in both China and the Indies for the EPISCOPAL Church of America. By 1916 she is very involved in her ministry in Oregon. While in Oregon, she was traveling in outreach to smaller communities. Alice spoke French and Italian and was also a lecturer at various Universities and churches in Oregon. Her lector with slides was a major crowd getter according to the newspapers of the day. I was not sure if the high tech slide projector or the topic were bigger attraction.

The Hood River community revered her and attempted repeatedly to make contact with her next of kin. The Hood River community were unable to locate her sister three years later at a Waterbury, CT address. A significant number of WWI Nurse mentioned her death and what had happened with locating any information on her.

In 1017, she wrote, Las Casas: The Apostle Of The Indies, which was reprinted in 2011 because "This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it." Her book was published by The Neale Publishing Company, NY
She is recognized in on the title page as Deaconess In The Protestant Episcopal Church Of America. She dedicated her book to her friend and Bishop, Robert Lewis Paddock, D.D.

The people of Oregon knew that she came from NY. This assumption was most likely due to where she attended, The Living Church Annual. 1917, page 164 she was listed as a deaconess but her school is not noted. However, her academic record is in the archive collection of NY Deaconess School or St. Faith's Deaconess Training School, which holds her academic record to to this day. In addition, her Mother was born in NY so Alice may have had family there.

Alice felt very strong about the need to minister to the WWI community overseas. In order to go on this ministry she has to provide a service to the military that was deemed acceptable for women at the time. Today she would be the military chaplain. She applied with the YMCA to work and was selected as a canteen worker. Sadly, the Red Cross failed to accurately reflect her education or her professional distinction as a Deaconess on her emergency notification card. She was deemed suitable to work in the canteen and to provide accurate resupply reports. The Red cross did note that she lecturer at the University.

It was apparent from the passport renewal statement that Alice provide valuable counseling services in her duty as a canteen worker, This was strongly endorsed by her boss as indicated on her passport renewal. She died at the end of the war and the cause is still undocumented. I am working with the State of Oregon Archives.

At one point, the WWI Nurses thought she was in England when she died. Alice was an incredible women! She was 57 years old when she arrived in France. To my knowledge she never married. She was described as very loving and committed to her soldiers and civilians overseas. Her duty to them as they completed the clean up and moving back of all the US equipment and forces were the reason she gave her congregation for reaming after the official end of the war.

The Red Cross was unable to locate her Next of her Kin, her big sister Jeannie Knight Pendleton who had also supplied her delayed birth record by signed affidavit for her first passport. The NOK was for a Mrs. EA Pendleton in CT. Jennie Knight Pendleton memorial# 150343640 was born Dec 1848 in Rhode Island. She died in 1927 and is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Waterbury, CT. Jennie’s husband,
Jennie Eugene A. Pendleton memorial #150343626 was born in 1840 in Ohio. He served in the He served in the during Ohio 9 Independent Battery Light Artillery during the Civil War.

I am unsure where Jeannie moved to but she was still living during the three year search. I believe that Lucy was in Maine and that is where she may have gone. Her brother in law, Eugene A. might have been receiving medical services as he was awarded a pension due to injuries related to his service. The Pendleton couple may have gone West in hopes of improving his health. Eugene died 03 Dec 1921. There appears to be some type of issue in 1923 with the widow pension. This may be due to a move. Their eldest son William K was living in NH so they could have also been with him.

It saddens me that Jennie died not knowing with came of her sassy energetic baby sister. Jeannie did not die until 1927 according to her gravestone. She is buried in CT with her husband, daughter Lucy and her other son Lewis and his wife.

Alice's grave has been reported to be Oise-Aisne American Cemetery Seringes-et- Nesles, France. There are conflicting dates of death between the 21st and the 22nd of April.
Researched Written by: Purple Mountain
Please ask permission to use.



Alice J Knight was the youngest daughter of Dr. Elan Knight and Mary J. Cross. She was listed on the 1860 Census listed as not yet a year old living in Natick, Middlesex, MA. At first her father is listed as a Homeopathic Physician in the 1880 census, which indicates caring for spiritual needs also. However, from that point on he is only referred to as a Physician.

In newspaper accounts he is very well respected by his colleagues. He was part of a team of doctors that performed the first successful cesareans without the use of anesthesia (as it had not yet been invented) in which both the African American mother and child lived at that point of the article it had been thirty years post surgery. The Doctors all had trained and lectured in NY. Alice lived with her parents in 1880. I cannot locate her on the 1900 census.

In a 1899 newspaper account , her father is near death from typhoid fever. He is referred to as a reverend chaplain as well as a physician. he has only hours to live. However, I do not locate an actual funeral notice. In the 1900 census, his wife Mary J is a widow living with Jennie and her family. There is a burial record for Mary J in 1902 in Waterbury, CT.

She ministered in both China and the Indies for the EPISCOPAL Church of America. By 1916 she is very involved in her ministry in Oregon. While in Oregon, she was traveling in outreach to smaller communities. Alice spoke French and Italian and was also a lecturer at various Universities and churches in Oregon. Her lector with slides was a major crowd getter according to the newspapers of the day. I was not sure if the high tech slide projector or the topic were bigger attraction.

The Hood River community revered her and attempted repeatedly to make contact with her next of kin. The Hood River community were unable to locate her sister three years later at a Waterbury, CT address. A significant number of WWI Nurse mentioned her death and what had happened with locating any information on her.

In 1017, she wrote, Las Casas: The Apostle Of The Indies, which was reprinted in 2011 because "This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it." Her book was published by The Neale Publishing Company, NY
She is recognized in on the title page as Deaconess In The Protestant Episcopal Church Of America. She dedicated her book to her friend and Bishop, Robert Lewis Paddock, D.D.

The people of Oregon knew that she came from NY. This assumption was most likely due to where she attended, The Living Church Annual. 1917, page 164 she was listed as a deaconess but her school is not noted. However, her academic record is in the archive collection of NY Deaconess School or St. Faith's Deaconess Training School, which holds her academic record to to this day. In addition, her Mother was born in NY so Alice may have had family there.

Alice felt very strong about the need to minister to the WWI community overseas. In order to go on this ministry she has to provide a service to the military that was deemed acceptable for women at the time. Today she would be the military chaplain. She applied with the YMCA to work and was selected as a canteen worker. Sadly, the Red Cross failed to accurately reflect her education or her professional distinction as a Deaconess on her emergency notification card. She was deemed suitable to work in the canteen and to provide accurate resupply reports. The Red cross did note that she lecturer at the University.

It was apparent from the passport renewal statement that Alice provide valuable counseling services in her duty as a canteen worker, This was strongly endorsed by her boss as indicated on her passport renewal. She died at the end of the war and the cause is still undocumented. I am working with the State of Oregon Archives.

At one point, the WWI Nurses thought she was in England when she died. Alice was an incredible women! She was 57 years old when she arrived in France. To my knowledge she never married. She was described as very loving and committed to her soldiers and civilians overseas. Her duty to them as they completed the clean up and moving back of all the US equipment and forces were the reason she gave her congregation for reaming after the official end of the war.

The Red Cross was unable to locate her Next of her Kin, her big sister Jeannie Knight Pendleton who had also supplied her delayed birth record by signed affidavit for her first passport. The NOK was for a Mrs. EA Pendleton in CT. Jennie Knight Pendleton memorial# 150343640 was born Dec 1848 in Rhode Island. She died in 1927 and is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Waterbury, CT. Jennie’s husband,
Jennie Eugene A. Pendleton memorial #150343626 was born in 1840 in Ohio. He served in the He served in the during Ohio 9 Independent Battery Light Artillery during the Civil War.

I am unsure where Jeannie moved to but she was still living during the three year search. I believe that Lucy was in Maine and that is where she may have gone. Her brother in law, Eugene A. might have been receiving medical services as he was awarded a pension due to injuries related to his service. The Pendleton couple may have gone West in hopes of improving his health. Eugene died 03 Dec 1921. There appears to be some type of issue in 1923 with the widow pension. This may be due to a move. Their eldest son William K was living in NH so they could have also been with him.

It saddens me that Jennie died not knowing with came of her sassy energetic baby sister. Jeannie did not die until 1927 according to her gravestone. She is buried in CT with her husband, daughter Lucy and her other son Lewis and his wife.

Alice's grave has been reported to be Oise-Aisne American Cemetery Seringes-et- Nesles, France. There are conflicting dates of death between the 21st and the 22nd of April.
Researched Written by: Purple Mountain
Please ask permission to use.




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  • Maintained by: Coleman ✿
  • Originally Created by: War Graves
  • Added: 8 Aug 2010
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 56638397
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/56638397/alice-j-knight: accessed ), memorial page for SEC Alice J. Knight (22 Jan 1860–21 Feb 1919), Find a Grave Memorial ID 56638397, citing Oise-Aisne American Cemetery and Memorial, Fere-en-Tardenois, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France; Maintained by Coleman ✿ (contributor 47076912) .