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Catherine <I>Carter</I> Silknitter

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Catherine Carter Silknitter

Birth
Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland, USA
Death
10 Aug 1899 (aged 81)
Centerville, Appanoose County, Iowa, USA
Burial
Centerville, Appanoose County, Iowa, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Catherine (Carter) Silknitter was born in Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland August 5, 1818 to John G. Carter and Ruth (Hager) Carter (both killed by Indians). She died at her home, two miles west of Centerville, August 10, 1899, aged 81 years and 5 days. She married Solomon Silknitter in Ohio in 1842. They moved from Ohio to Indiana in an early day and from Indiana to Iowa in 1849, where she lived until called to her long home.
To Mr. and Mrs. Silknitter eleven children were born all of whom survive save one. The names of the children are as follows; Henry P., living with his family at Rose Hill, KS; Mary J., wife of J. M. Elgin of Centerville; Benjamin F., Centerville; Rebecca S., wife of R. S. Thompson of Wilcox, MO; Hiram W. of Rose Hill, KS; Lovina S., wife of Charles Smith, Centerville; John Powell, Centerville; Chloe M., died July 23, 1860; Eli E., Chicago; Solomon Silknitter died March 4, 1865, aged 48 years.
Mrs. Silknitter was all her lifetime a consistent earnest member of the Presbyterian church. She was one of the charter members of this organization in Centerville. She had been ill but a few days when death came to her relief at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles Smith, two miles west of Centerville, where recent years she had made her home. The funeral took place on Saturday afternoon, August 12, at 2:00 o'clock, the service being conducted by Rev. C. G. Miller, pastor of the First Presbyterian church of Centerville, who took for his text Rev. 14:13. The quartette sang some beautiful hymns expressive of hope and immortality, after which a large concourse of people followed the remains to their last resting place in Oakland cemetery. And, thus has passed from our midst another long and useful life. Of this one it could truthfully be said that she made the world better for having lived in it. The life on earth is ended but its influence for good shall yet continue; for, "she being dead yet speaketh.
Catherine (Carter) Silknitter was born in Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland August 5, 1818 to John G. Carter and Ruth (Hager) Carter (both killed by Indians). She died at her home, two miles west of Centerville, August 10, 1899, aged 81 years and 5 days. She married Solomon Silknitter in Ohio in 1842. They moved from Ohio to Indiana in an early day and from Indiana to Iowa in 1849, where she lived until called to her long home.
To Mr. and Mrs. Silknitter eleven children were born all of whom survive save one. The names of the children are as follows; Henry P., living with his family at Rose Hill, KS; Mary J., wife of J. M. Elgin of Centerville; Benjamin F., Centerville; Rebecca S., wife of R. S. Thompson of Wilcox, MO; Hiram W. of Rose Hill, KS; Lovina S., wife of Charles Smith, Centerville; John Powell, Centerville; Chloe M., died July 23, 1860; Eli E., Chicago; Solomon Silknitter died March 4, 1865, aged 48 years.
Mrs. Silknitter was all her lifetime a consistent earnest member of the Presbyterian church. She was one of the charter members of this organization in Centerville. She had been ill but a few days when death came to her relief at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles Smith, two miles west of Centerville, where recent years she had made her home. The funeral took place on Saturday afternoon, August 12, at 2:00 o'clock, the service being conducted by Rev. C. G. Miller, pastor of the First Presbyterian church of Centerville, who took for his text Rev. 14:13. The quartette sang some beautiful hymns expressive of hope and immortality, after which a large concourse of people followed the remains to their last resting place in Oakland cemetery. And, thus has passed from our midst another long and useful life. Of this one it could truthfully be said that she made the world better for having lived in it. The life on earth is ended but its influence for good shall yet continue; for, "she being dead yet speaketh.


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