Advertisement

PVT Wayne Miner

Advertisement

PVT Wayne Miner

Birth
Calhoun, Henry County, Missouri, USA
Death
11 Nov 1918 (aged 28)
Bouxieres-sous-Froidmont, Departement de Meurthe-et-Moselle, Lorraine, France
Burial
Thiaucourt-Regnieville, Departement de Meurthe-et-Moselle, Lorraine, France
Plot
Plot B; Row 14; Grave 17
Memorial ID
56341265 View Source

NEGRO SOLDIERS CALLED
----------
Some to Leave Here for Camp Dodge October 26
----------
All negro men called into the service by the draft will be taken to Camp Dodge on the 26th of this month. This is the order which came to the county auditor this morning and immediately plans were begun for notifying these men that they should hold themselves in readiness for this call. The men whom this affects are those which have passed the physical examination and have not been excused by the local or district board. There are five men in the county whom this call will take, while it will also affect two more. The first five men hold draft numbers which come within the 192 quota limit, while the other two hold numbers which are near the dividing line. Before the 26th of the month the local board will have found out whether or not these last two men will go at this time. The men will be mobilized at the court house on the 25th of the month and will keave for
Des Moines on the 26th. The routing of these boys has not yet been announced.

The men to go are Wayne Miner, William Henry Ousley, Jorden Hockady, Jesse Taylor, George Bolden. Those whose going at this is uncertain are John Leek, Cyrus Downing.
The Centerville Daily Iowegian and Citizen, October 17, 1917

TELLS OF DEATH OF FRIEND
----------
Frank Conley Writes Also of Work and Play in France

Pvt. Frank C. Conley, now serving with the 80th Pioneer Infantry in France, has written to his mother, Mrs. Mattie E. Conley that he expects to be discharged and returned home soon. The letter was dated December 3. Conley also mentions the death of Wayman Minor, of Jerome vicinity, and asks that a gold star be placed in the service flag for him. His letter follows:

Toul, France, 12-3-’18
Dear Mother and All: - While sitting around, I thought I would drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well and hope these few lines will reach and find you ad the little boys likewise.

I have been in the hospital for two weeks but am getting along fine. How are all of the Jeromers. Also the folks at the Monkey.

Mother I guess you heard that Wayman Minor was killed just a few hours before the Germans surrendered. I don’t know if I’ll get to go back to my company or not. We are looking to start home at any time. It won’t be too soon for me, as I am all in. My foot about kills me at times.

Have not seen John or Finis for two weeks. Had a letter from Aunt M., she is in Keokuk.

Well mother I sure will be glad to get back to your house to stay, but want to go to see Pansy and Fannie before I start to work.

The days sure are short over here, six hours difference in the time here and in New York. When you are eating dinner we are in bed.

We sure have some fun over here, but not like in good old U. S. A. This is a funny country. It rains all the time. Tell Uncle Jim and Carey to stay until I get home.

Well mother you need not answer this letter for I will soon be there with you again. Tell Johnny that it is no use to answer his letter, and to Ida, she knows how I am about writing. Love and regard to all. Will close hoping to be with you all in a few weeks, goodby-bye.

from you loving son,
Pvt. Frank C. Conley.

P. S. - A gold star for Wayman Minor on the flag. Don’t forget it please.
The Centerville Daily Iowegian and Citizen, Saturday, January 18, 1919

KILLED THREE HOURS BEFORE ARMISTICE
----------
Word has been received here of the death in action of Private Wayman Minor, colored, of this city, in France, on the morning of November 11, just three hours before the signing of the armistice.

Minor went with the first colored group of drafted men for this vicinity and crossed to France after a period of training. He took part in several battles and the irony of fate made him a victim just before hostilities ceased.

Wayman Minor was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ned Minor, of near the Drum and Monkey mine. He also leaves a wife, she making her home with her mother in Kansas City.
The Centerville Semi Weekly Iowegian, Monday, June 23, 1919

Wayman “Wayne” Miner

Wayman, “Wayne” Miner was born in Calhoun, Henry County, Missouri, August 27, 1890, one of thirteen children, born to former slaves Ned and Emily (Bradley) Miner. Shortly after 1900 the Miner family moved to Diamond in Johns Township, about three miles east of Plano, Appanoose County, Iowa, where the father farmed and worked as a coal miner.

On December 26, 1911 Wayne Miner married Belle Carter in Harkes, Johns Township, Appanoose County, Iowa, where he worked as a coal miner. They did not have any children.

In October 1917 Miner was drafted into the United States Army at Centerville, Iowa. On October 27, 1917 Miner and five other African-Americans, Tom Gordon, William Henry Ousley, Jorden Hockady, Jesse Taylor and George Bolden, left Centerville on the interurban for basic training at Camp Dodge, Iowa. There was an elaborate banquet held for the soldiers the previous night at The Second Baptist Church along with a later reception at the Elk’s Club held by the War Emergency committee of the Centerville Association of Commerce.

On January 1, 1918 Miner was appointed Private First Class, and on June 15, 1918, he shipped out to France with Company A, 366th Infantry Regiment, 92nd Division. This was an all-black combat unit that had as its insignia a charging buffalo, whose slogan was, “Deeds, Not Words.”

Early on November 11, 1918, Miner was serving with 1st platoon, Company A, 1st Battalion of the 366th Infantry, with the 30,000 strong, all-black, 92nd division, commanded by First Lieutenant William H. Clark, when First Lieutenant Oscar Brown, commanding the 351st Machine Gun Company sent through a request for four men from each company to assist in carrying machine gun ammunition to their machine gun outpost. At first Lieutenant Clark had no volunteers. The Lieutenant then suggested he would do it by a lottery system. It was then that Private Wayne Miner stepped forward as the first volunteer, followed by three other soldiers.

45 years later Lieutenant Clark recalled at that moment he got a lump in his throat. Miner had gone out on every patrol since the company arrived. Clark didn’t want to use him on this one, likely his last one. He was a fine young man, a good man, courageous, well liked and much respected by everyone in the outfit.

Miner and the other soldiers then headed out to the machine gun outpost over rough terrain, rifles slung across their backs, lugging the ammo, essentially becoming pack horses. During this mission Miner was killed by busting shrapnel three hours before the armistice was signed at 11 a.m. on November 11, 1918, being one of the last soldiers to die in World War I, “The War to End All Wars.”

Lieutenant Clark recommended Private Miner for the Distinguished Service Cross. Somehow, his captain never received the request and a brave sacrificing and deserving soldier did not receive his reward even posthumously.

Wayne Miner, was buried in the Saint Mihiel American Cemetery at Thiaucort, France. His name along with other Appanoose County soldiers who died in the war are on the bronze tablets on the World War I memorial, the Arch of Remembrance, in Centerville’s Oakland Cemetery. The Arch was build in 1923 by P.E.O. Chapter D and restored in 2009 by Chapter D.

Wayne Miner’s parents, Ned and Emily, who both died in 1936, are both buried in unmarked graves in the Philadelphia Cemetery near Mystic, Iowa.

Bio by Gary D. Craver

NEGRO SOLDIERS CALLED
----------
Some to Leave Here for Camp Dodge October 26
----------
All negro men called into the service by the draft will be taken to Camp Dodge on the 26th of this month. This is the order which came to the county auditor this morning and immediately plans were begun for notifying these men that they should hold themselves in readiness for this call. The men whom this affects are those which have passed the physical examination and have not been excused by the local or district board. There are five men in the county whom this call will take, while it will also affect two more. The first five men hold draft numbers which come within the 192 quota limit, while the other two hold numbers which are near the dividing line. Before the 26th of the month the local board will have found out whether or not these last two men will go at this time. The men will be mobilized at the court house on the 25th of the month and will keave for
Des Moines on the 26th. The routing of these boys has not yet been announced.

The men to go are Wayne Miner, William Henry Ousley, Jorden Hockady, Jesse Taylor, George Bolden. Those whose going at this is uncertain are John Leek, Cyrus Downing.
The Centerville Daily Iowegian and Citizen, October 17, 1917

TELLS OF DEATH OF FRIEND
----------
Frank Conley Writes Also of Work and Play in France

Pvt. Frank C. Conley, now serving with the 80th Pioneer Infantry in France, has written to his mother, Mrs. Mattie E. Conley that he expects to be discharged and returned home soon. The letter was dated December 3. Conley also mentions the death of Wayman Minor, of Jerome vicinity, and asks that a gold star be placed in the service flag for him. His letter follows:

Toul, France, 12-3-’18
Dear Mother and All: - While sitting around, I thought I would drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well and hope these few lines will reach and find you ad the little boys likewise.

I have been in the hospital for two weeks but am getting along fine. How are all of the Jeromers. Also the folks at the Monkey.

Mother I guess you heard that Wayman Minor was killed just a few hours before the Germans surrendered. I don’t know if I’ll get to go back to my company or not. We are looking to start home at any time. It won’t be too soon for me, as I am all in. My foot about kills me at times.

Have not seen John or Finis for two weeks. Had a letter from Aunt M., she is in Keokuk.

Well mother I sure will be glad to get back to your house to stay, but want to go to see Pansy and Fannie before I start to work.

The days sure are short over here, six hours difference in the time here and in New York. When you are eating dinner we are in bed.

We sure have some fun over here, but not like in good old U. S. A. This is a funny country. It rains all the time. Tell Uncle Jim and Carey to stay until I get home.

Well mother you need not answer this letter for I will soon be there with you again. Tell Johnny that it is no use to answer his letter, and to Ida, she knows how I am about writing. Love and regard to all. Will close hoping to be with you all in a few weeks, goodby-bye.

from you loving son,
Pvt. Frank C. Conley.

P. S. - A gold star for Wayman Minor on the flag. Don’t forget it please.
The Centerville Daily Iowegian and Citizen, Saturday, January 18, 1919

KILLED THREE HOURS BEFORE ARMISTICE
----------
Word has been received here of the death in action of Private Wayman Minor, colored, of this city, in France, on the morning of November 11, just three hours before the signing of the armistice.

Minor went with the first colored group of drafted men for this vicinity and crossed to France after a period of training. He took part in several battles and the irony of fate made him a victim just before hostilities ceased.

Wayman Minor was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ned Minor, of near the Drum and Monkey mine. He also leaves a wife, she making her home with her mother in Kansas City.
The Centerville Semi Weekly Iowegian, Monday, June 23, 1919

Wayman “Wayne” Miner

Wayman, “Wayne” Miner was born in Calhoun, Henry County, Missouri, August 27, 1890, one of thirteen children, born to former slaves Ned and Emily (Bradley) Miner. Shortly after 1900 the Miner family moved to Diamond in Johns Township, about three miles east of Plano, Appanoose County, Iowa, where the father farmed and worked as a coal miner.

On December 26, 1911 Wayne Miner married Belle Carter in Harkes, Johns Township, Appanoose County, Iowa, where he worked as a coal miner. They did not have any children.

In October 1917 Miner was drafted into the United States Army at Centerville, Iowa. On October 27, 1917 Miner and five other African-Americans, Tom Gordon, William Henry Ousley, Jorden Hockady, Jesse Taylor and George Bolden, left Centerville on the interurban for basic training at Camp Dodge, Iowa. There was an elaborate banquet held for the soldiers the previous night at The Second Baptist Church along with a later reception at the Elk’s Club held by the War Emergency committee of the Centerville Association of Commerce.

On January 1, 1918 Miner was appointed Private First Class, and on June 15, 1918, he shipped out to France with Company A, 366th Infantry Regiment, 92nd Division. This was an all-black combat unit that had as its insignia a charging buffalo, whose slogan was, “Deeds, Not Words.”

Early on November 11, 1918, Miner was serving with 1st platoon, Company A, 1st Battalion of the 366th Infantry, with the 30,000 strong, all-black, 92nd division, commanded by First Lieutenant William H. Clark, when First Lieutenant Oscar Brown, commanding the 351st Machine Gun Company sent through a request for four men from each company to assist in carrying machine gun ammunition to their machine gun outpost. At first Lieutenant Clark had no volunteers. The Lieutenant then suggested he would do it by a lottery system. It was then that Private Wayne Miner stepped forward as the first volunteer, followed by three other soldiers.

45 years later Lieutenant Clark recalled at that moment he got a lump in his throat. Miner had gone out on every patrol since the company arrived. Clark didn’t want to use him on this one, likely his last one. He was a fine young man, a good man, courageous, well liked and much respected by everyone in the outfit.

Miner and the other soldiers then headed out to the machine gun outpost over rough terrain, rifles slung across their backs, lugging the ammo, essentially becoming pack horses. During this mission Miner was killed by busting shrapnel three hours before the armistice was signed at 11 a.m. on November 11, 1918, being one of the last soldiers to die in World War I, “The War to End All Wars.”

Lieutenant Clark recommended Private Miner for the Distinguished Service Cross. Somehow, his captain never received the request and a brave sacrificing and deserving soldier did not receive his reward even posthumously.

Wayne Miner, was buried in the Saint Mihiel American Cemetery at Thiaucort, France. His name along with other Appanoose County soldiers who died in the war are on the bronze tablets on the World War I memorial, the Arch of Remembrance, in Centerville’s Oakland Cemetery. The Arch was build in 1923 by P.E.O. Chapter D and restored in 2009 by Chapter D.

Wayne Miner’s parents, Ned and Emily, who both died in 1936, are both buried in unmarked graves in the Philadelphia Cemetery near Mystic, Iowa.

Bio by Gary D. Craver


Inscription

PVT. 366 INF. 92 DIV.
IOWA NOV. 11, 1918

Gravesite Details

Entered service from Iowa


Family Members

Parents
Spouse

Flowers

In their memory
Plant Memorial Trees

Sponsored by Ancestry

Advertisement

  • Maintained by: Gary Craver
  • Originally Created by: War Graves
  • Added: 7 Aug 2010
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 56341265
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/56341265/wayne-miner: accessed ), memorial page for PVT Wayne Miner (17 Aug 1890–11 Nov 1918), Find a Grave Memorial ID 56341265, citing Saint Mihiel American Cemetery and Memorial, Thiaucourt-Regnieville, Departement de Meurthe-et-Moselle, Lorraine, France; Maintained by Gary Craver (contributor 8390467) .