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 William Godwin

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William Godwin Famous memorial

Birth
Wisbech, Fenland District, Cambridgeshire, England
Death
7 Apr 1836 (aged 80)
London, City of London, Greater London, England
Burial*
St Pancras, London Borough of Camden, Greater London, England

* This is the original burial site

Memorial ID
5631 View Source

Author, Philosopher. He was an English author of the late 18th century, who was known for his far-reaching, comparing to the majority, political ideas and religious beliefs. Born the seventh of thirteen children of a strict minister, he was an atheist and received a formal education. In his 1793 book, "An Enquiry into Political Justice," he supports freedom from any conventional government and complete individualism. Material things, such as land, would go to those in the greatest need, but does not explain clearly who decides this "greater need." There would be no need to have marriages. He wrote "everything understood by the term co-operation is in some sense an evil." In 1795, he wrote an updated version of "An Enquiry into Political Justice," which was not as zealous as the first. He wrote other philosophical pieces, "The Enquirer" in 1798 and "Thoughts on Man" in 1831. In 1794 he wrote the Gothic novel, "The Adventures of Caleb Williams," which is full of mystery and suspense and deals with social classes. Trying his hand at the stage, he authored two unsuccessful dramas as well as a few more novels, but none as famous as "Caleb Williams." In 1797 he married the free-spirited feminist, Mary Wollestonecraft, who was an author and the mother of a daughter. The couple were the parents of Mary Shelley, author of the scientific horror story, "Frankenstein." His wife died of an infection eleven days after giving birth. In 1798 he authored "Memoirs of the Author of a Vindication of the Rights of Woman," revealing his wife's behavior, which was considered in the 18th century an unorthodox lifestyle for a lady. As a widower, he married Mary Jane Clairmont Godwin, the mother of two daughters, in 1801. The couple had a bookshop and were active in literary circles, which included Lord Byron. He and his second wife had a son, William Godwin the Younger in 1803. After being an author for various periodicals, his only son became a successful parliamentary reporter to the "Morning Chronicle," but died in the autumn of 1832 during the world-wide cholera epidemic, leaving a childless widow. He arranged for the posthumous publication of his son's only novel, "Transfusion." His blended family included his daughter and son as well as his three step-daughters and all were well-educated. Originally buried in Saint Pancras Churchyard in London with both of his wives, his remains along with the first wife's were moved by their grandson to St. Peter's Churchyard, Bournmouth, England in 1851 after his daughter, Mary Shelley's death. He and his first wife share a marker.

Author, Philosopher. He was an English author of the late 18th century, who was known for his far-reaching, comparing to the majority, political ideas and religious beliefs. Born the seventh of thirteen children of a strict minister, he was an atheist and received a formal education. In his 1793 book, "An Enquiry into Political Justice," he supports freedom from any conventional government and complete individualism. Material things, such as land, would go to those in the greatest need, but does not explain clearly who decides this "greater need." There would be no need to have marriages. He wrote "everything understood by the term co-operation is in some sense an evil." In 1795, he wrote an updated version of "An Enquiry into Political Justice," which was not as zealous as the first. He wrote other philosophical pieces, "The Enquirer" in 1798 and "Thoughts on Man" in 1831. In 1794 he wrote the Gothic novel, "The Adventures of Caleb Williams," which is full of mystery and suspense and deals with social classes. Trying his hand at the stage, he authored two unsuccessful dramas as well as a few more novels, but none as famous as "Caleb Williams." In 1797 he married the free-spirited feminist, Mary Wollestonecraft, who was an author and the mother of a daughter. The couple were the parents of Mary Shelley, author of the scientific horror story, "Frankenstein." His wife died of an infection eleven days after giving birth. In 1798 he authored "Memoirs of the Author of a Vindication of the Rights of Woman," revealing his wife's behavior, which was considered in the 18th century an unorthodox lifestyle for a lady. As a widower, he married Mary Jane Clairmont Godwin, the mother of two daughters, in 1801. The couple had a bookshop and were active in literary circles, which included Lord Byron. He and his second wife had a son, William Godwin the Younger in 1803. After being an author for various periodicals, his only son became a successful parliamentary reporter to the "Morning Chronicle," but died in the autumn of 1832 during the world-wide cholera epidemic, leaving a childless widow. He arranged for the posthumous publication of his son's only novel, "Transfusion." His blended family included his daughter and son as well as his three step-daughters and all were well-educated. Originally buried in Saint Pancras Churchyard in London with both of his wives, his remains along with the first wife's were moved by their grandson to St. Peter's Churchyard, Bournmouth, England in 1851 after his daughter, Mary Shelley's death. He and his first wife share a marker.

Bio by: Linda Davis


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AUTHOR OF POLITICAL JUSTICE


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Added: 7 Jun 1999
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 5631
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/5631/william-godwin: accessed ), memorial page for William Godwin (3 Mar 1756–7 Apr 1836), Find a Grave Memorial ID 5631, citing St. Pancras Old Churchyard, St Pancras, London Borough of Camden, Greater London, England; Maintained by Find a Grave .