LTJG Frederick Thomas Weber

LTJG Frederick Thomas Weber

Birth
Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, USA
Death
4 Jun 1942 (aged 26)
At Sea
Memorial Site*
Honolulu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, USA

* A structure erected in honor of someone whose remains lie elsewhere.

Plot
Courts of the Missing
Memorial ID
56134951 View Source

WW2 Navy Cross Recipient

Born in Des Moines, Iowa Frederick T. Weber attended college at Knox College in Galesburg, Ill. before transferring to Drake University in Des Moines in 1935. He graduated during the summer of 1938 and enlisted in the United States Naval Reserve on 30 August 1938. Seaman 2d Class Weber successfully completed elimination flight training at the Naval Reserve Aviation Base, Kansas City, Kansas; and, on 31 July 1939, he was appointed an aviation cadet in the Naval Reserve. After 10 months of training at the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla., Weber was commissioned on 25 March 1940 (according to naval register of 1 Jan 1941) and appointed a naval aviator on 10 May 1940. A little over a month later, he concluded his training and, on 12 June 1940, he received orders to Bombing Squadron (VB) 6 attached to the carrier Enterprise (CV 6).

On the morning on 4 Jun 1942 aircraft of the USS Enterprise's air group launched to attack the Japanese carrier striking force that was approaching the Midway atoll. Bombing Squadron Six (VB-6) attacked the enemy Japanese Force scoring a number of direct hits on the enemy aircraft carriers. Of the fifteen dive bombers from VB-6 that took off from the Enterprise that morning only five survived the attack although six pilots and five gunners where rescued later. Enemy anti-aircraft fire and fuel exhaustion took the biggest toll on this squadron after the initial attacks. Ensign Frederick Thomas Weber and AOM3 Ernest Lenard Hilbert did not return from this mission, and they were listed as missing in action. Their remains were unrecoverable. On 5 Jun 1943 they were "presumed" dead. Ensign Weber was awarded the Navy Cross, the Purple Heart and the Presidential Unit Citation.
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Presidential Unit Citation awarded to the aircrews of Carrier Air Group Six and crewmembers of the USS Enterprise (CV-6).
The citation reads:
For consistently outstanding performance and distinguished achievement during repeated action against enemy Japanese forces in the Pacific war area, 7 December 1941, to 15 November 1942. Participating in nearly every major carrier engagement in the first year of the war, the Enterprise and her air group, exclusive of far-flung destruction of hostile shore installations throughout the battle area, did sink or damage on her own a total of 35 Japanese vessels and shot down a total of 185 Japanese aircraft. Her aggressive spirit and superb combat efficiency are fitting tribute to the officers and men who so gallantly established her as an ahead bulwark in the defense of the American nation.
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USS Weber (DE-675) was a Buckley-class destroyer escort named in honor of Ensign Frederick T. Weber. Weber's keel was laid on 22 Feb 1943 at Quincy, Mass, by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Company's Fore River Shipyard. She was launched on 01 May 1943 and sponsored by Mrs Matt A. Walsh. Commissioned on 30 Jun 1943. Following post shakedown operations Weber began transatlantic convoy escort duties until Dec 1944 when she was redesigned a high-speed transport with a new hull number, APD-75. Upon completion of the conversion, Weber departed Norfolk, VA for the Pacific. Weber provided escort services and antisubmarine duty. After war's end, Weber returned to San Diego in Dec 1945. She was then ordered to proceed to the New York Naval Shipyard to begin the inactivation process. On 23 Feb 1946 Weber entered Green Cove Springs, FL where she reported to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet for layup. She was struck from the Navy List on 01 Jun 1960. On 15 July 1962, Weber was sunk as a target by AGM-12 Bullpup air to surface missiles. Weber earned one battle star during WWII.
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[bio compiled by G47]

*WEBER, FREDERICK THOMAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Frederick Thomas Weber (0-083087), Ensign, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in operations against the enemy while serving as Pilot of a carrier-based Navy Dive Bomber of Bombing Squadron SIX (VB-6), embarked from the U.S.S. ENTERPRISE (CV-6), during the "Air Battle of Midway," against enemy Japanese forces on 4 June 1942. Defying extreme danger from concentrated anti- aircraft barrage and powerful fighter opposition, Ensign Weber, with bold determination and courageous zeal, participated in dive-bombing assaults against Japanese naval units. Flying at a distance from his own forces which rendered return unlikely because of probable fuel exhaustion, he pressed home his attacks with extreme disregard for his own personal safety, scoring a direct hit on an enemy aircraft carrier. Later, while pressing home a desperate and vigorous counterattack against enemy Japanese fighter planes, he was shot down. His gallant intrepidity and loyal devotion to duty contributed greatly to the success of our forces and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)
Born: February 4, 1916 at Des Moines, Iowa
Home Town: Galesburg, Illinois

For additional information, please visit 99 Lives: The Knox College Gold Star Memorial (knox.edu/99lives).

WW2 Navy Cross Recipient

Born in Des Moines, Iowa Frederick T. Weber attended college at Knox College in Galesburg, Ill. before transferring to Drake University in Des Moines in 1935. He graduated during the summer of 1938 and enlisted in the United States Naval Reserve on 30 August 1938. Seaman 2d Class Weber successfully completed elimination flight training at the Naval Reserve Aviation Base, Kansas City, Kansas; and, on 31 July 1939, he was appointed an aviation cadet in the Naval Reserve. After 10 months of training at the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla., Weber was commissioned on 25 March 1940 (according to naval register of 1 Jan 1941) and appointed a naval aviator on 10 May 1940. A little over a month later, he concluded his training and, on 12 June 1940, he received orders to Bombing Squadron (VB) 6 attached to the carrier Enterprise (CV 6).

On the morning on 4 Jun 1942 aircraft of the USS Enterprise's air group launched to attack the Japanese carrier striking force that was approaching the Midway atoll. Bombing Squadron Six (VB-6) attacked the enemy Japanese Force scoring a number of direct hits on the enemy aircraft carriers. Of the fifteen dive bombers from VB-6 that took off from the Enterprise that morning only five survived the attack although six pilots and five gunners where rescued later. Enemy anti-aircraft fire and fuel exhaustion took the biggest toll on this squadron after the initial attacks. Ensign Frederick Thomas Weber and AOM3 Ernest Lenard Hilbert did not return from this mission, and they were listed as missing in action. Their remains were unrecoverable. On 5 Jun 1943 they were "presumed" dead. Ensign Weber was awarded the Navy Cross, the Purple Heart and the Presidential Unit Citation.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Presidential Unit Citation awarded to the aircrews of Carrier Air Group Six and crewmembers of the USS Enterprise (CV-6).
The citation reads:
For consistently outstanding performance and distinguished achievement during repeated action against enemy Japanese forces in the Pacific war area, 7 December 1941, to 15 November 1942. Participating in nearly every major carrier engagement in the first year of the war, the Enterprise and her air group, exclusive of far-flung destruction of hostile shore installations throughout the battle area, did sink or damage on her own a total of 35 Japanese vessels and shot down a total of 185 Japanese aircraft. Her aggressive spirit and superb combat efficiency are fitting tribute to the officers and men who so gallantly established her as an ahead bulwark in the defense of the American nation.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
USS Weber (DE-675) was a Buckley-class destroyer escort named in honor of Ensign Frederick T. Weber. Weber's keel was laid on 22 Feb 1943 at Quincy, Mass, by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Company's Fore River Shipyard. She was launched on 01 May 1943 and sponsored by Mrs Matt A. Walsh. Commissioned on 30 Jun 1943. Following post shakedown operations Weber began transatlantic convoy escort duties until Dec 1944 when she was redesigned a high-speed transport with a new hull number, APD-75. Upon completion of the conversion, Weber departed Norfolk, VA for the Pacific. Weber provided escort services and antisubmarine duty. After war's end, Weber returned to San Diego in Dec 1945. She was then ordered to proceed to the New York Naval Shipyard to begin the inactivation process. On 23 Feb 1946 Weber entered Green Cove Springs, FL where she reported to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet for layup. She was struck from the Navy List on 01 Jun 1960. On 15 July 1962, Weber was sunk as a target by AGM-12 Bullpup air to surface missiles. Weber earned one battle star during WWII.
------------------------------------------------------------
[bio compiled by G47]

*WEBER, FREDERICK THOMAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Frederick Thomas Weber (0-083087), Ensign, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in operations against the enemy while serving as Pilot of a carrier-based Navy Dive Bomber of Bombing Squadron SIX (VB-6), embarked from the U.S.S. ENTERPRISE (CV-6), during the "Air Battle of Midway," against enemy Japanese forces on 4 June 1942. Defying extreme danger from concentrated anti- aircraft barrage and powerful fighter opposition, Ensign Weber, with bold determination and courageous zeal, participated in dive-bombing assaults against Japanese naval units. Flying at a distance from his own forces which rendered return unlikely because of probable fuel exhaustion, he pressed home his attacks with extreme disregard for his own personal safety, scoring a direct hit on an enemy aircraft carrier. Later, while pressing home a desperate and vigorous counterattack against enemy Japanese fighter planes, he was shot down. His gallant intrepidity and loyal devotion to duty contributed greatly to the success of our forces and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)
Born: February 4, 1916 at Des Moines, Iowa
Home Town: Galesburg, Illinois

For additional information, please visit 99 Lives: The Knox College Gold Star Memorial (knox.edu/99lives).

Gravesite Details

Entered the service from Illinois.


Family Members

Parents