Advertisement

William Thomas Scott

Advertisement

William Thomas Scott

Birth
Wilkinson County, Mississippi, USA
Death
1 Nov 1887 (aged 75)
Scottsville, Harrison County, Texas, USA
Burial
Scottsville, Harrison County, Texas, USA GPS-Latitude: 32.5410574, Longitude: -94.2331296
Memorial ID
View Source
William Thomas (Colonel Buck) Scott, legislator and planter, son of Thomas and Mary Keller Scott, was born in Wilkinson County, Mississippi.

On March 8, 1834, he married Mary Washington Rose, daughter of William Pinckney Rose. William and Mary Rose Scott, along with her parents and others of the Rose and Scott families, immigrated to Texas in June 1840 and settled in Harrison County. Scott quickly acquired several large parcels of land and established five cotton plantations, including Scottsville Plantation,near the town he founded.

Scott was elected to the House of Representatives of the last Congress of the Republic of Texas and was a member of the Senate of the First Texas Legislature in 1846. He declined reelection the next term because of an eye affliction, but was elected to the state Senate in 1851 and served until 1856. He was a member of the Secession Convention of 1861. After his disfranchisement was lifted by President Andrew Johnson he again entered political life. He was returned to the Texas Senate from 1879 to 1882.

In 1852 he introduced the bill chartering the Vicksburg and El Paso Railroad. He, and eight other men, was listed as an incorporator of the company. A charter amendment in 1856, achieved over the veto of Governor E. M. Pease, renamed the company the Southern Pacific Railroad Company (no connection with the modern company of the same name). Only a few miles of track was actually laid before the onset of the Civil War. After the war, most of the incorporators, including Scott, had lost most of their assets. Stock and control of the line were sold to other investors, who then began construction under the reorganized company called the Texas and Pacific Railway. Scott served on the board of directors of the company and as vice president from 1859 to 1861.

Scott died at Scottsville Plantation and was buried in the Scottsville Cemetery next to his wife.
William Thomas (Colonel Buck) Scott, legislator and planter, son of Thomas and Mary Keller Scott, was born in Wilkinson County, Mississippi.

On March 8, 1834, he married Mary Washington Rose, daughter of William Pinckney Rose. William and Mary Rose Scott, along with her parents and others of the Rose and Scott families, immigrated to Texas in June 1840 and settled in Harrison County. Scott quickly acquired several large parcels of land and established five cotton plantations, including Scottsville Plantation,near the town he founded.

Scott was elected to the House of Representatives of the last Congress of the Republic of Texas and was a member of the Senate of the First Texas Legislature in 1846. He declined reelection the next term because of an eye affliction, but was elected to the state Senate in 1851 and served until 1856. He was a member of the Secession Convention of 1861. After his disfranchisement was lifted by President Andrew Johnson he again entered political life. He was returned to the Texas Senate from 1879 to 1882.

In 1852 he introduced the bill chartering the Vicksburg and El Paso Railroad. He, and eight other men, was listed as an incorporator of the company. A charter amendment in 1856, achieved over the veto of Governor E. M. Pease, renamed the company the Southern Pacific Railroad Company (no connection with the modern company of the same name). Only a few miles of track was actually laid before the onset of the Civil War. After the war, most of the incorporators, including Scott, had lost most of their assets. Stock and control of the line were sold to other investors, who then began construction under the reorganized company called the Texas and Pacific Railway. Scott served on the board of directors of the company and as vice president from 1859 to 1861.

Scott died at Scottsville Plantation and was buried in the Scottsville Cemetery next to his wife.


Advertisement