James Lee Jackson

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James Lee Jackson

Birth
Tallahatchie County, Mississippi, USA
Death
12 Jan 1929 (aged 73)
Oakland, Yalobusha County, Mississippi, USA
Burial
Oakland, Yalobusha County, Mississippi, USA GPS-Latitude: 34.0455704, Longitude: -89.9180069
Memorial ID
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Gospel preacher. The following was written by M. H. Harmon in 1929:

Lee Jackson. My first meeting with Bro. Jackson was in McComb City when I held a revival there, about 1894. He was born at Mitchells Cross Roads, in Tallahatchie County about 73 years ago. He was educated in Mars Hill College, Florence, Alabama, under that matchless preacher, T. B. Larimore. Bro. Jackson has given nearly all his ministerial life to the cause in his native state. He has always had some peculiarities in his preaching, like a great many men, and I suppose wholly unconscious of it. Like the lamented Manire, you would soon forget the eccentricities of the speaker by being absorbed in what the speaker was saying. Bro. Jackson is a deep thinker, and original in his thoughts and preaching, and has given his entire life without reserve to building up the "weak places in Zion." He never got for his services in his life a tithe of what his ministry meant to those upon whom he gave his best efforts. He lives now, (1929) in Oakland, Mississippi.

Since writing the above tribute, Bro. Jackson has been called to his eternal reward. (H.) --- M. F. Harmon, History of The Christian Churches (Disciples of Christ) in Mississippi, 1929.

Lee Jackson by W.H. Owen.
We should not wait till after good men are dead to speak words of commendation of their character and work. I am glad that I told Brother Jackson during his life of my appreciation of him and of the benefit and encouragement I received from my acquaintance and association with him. Still, after such men are gone from us, it is natural that their virtues come fresh in our memories, and proper that expression be given to reflections along these lines. One of the elements of greatness in the character of Brother Jackson was humility. He never sought to be in the limelight and few recognized the extent of his ability. He went about his work in a quiet and unassuming way and never tried to impress people with the superiority of his own attainments. As a clear thinker, a deep reasoner, and a forceful writer, he had few equals and possibly no superiors. He could not boast of college degrees. He was the kind of man that did not have to depend on colleges for scholarship. He was a student all of his life and was well versed in several branches of learning, especially New Testament history. I doubt if a man can be found who has a clearer conception of the New Testament church or is more familiar with its history. He did a large amount of research in that particular field, and his findings constitute a real contribution to religious literature. It is a pity they were not more widely published. In his humble way he did what he could to counteract the evil tendency toward a sectarian spirit and the denominational use of the name, "church of Christ." The writer is indebted to him much for a better understanding along these lines. Brother Jackson's character might be summed up in these few words: He possessed qualities of mind and heart that placed him above the level of the average man. Feb. 21, 1929, Gospel Advocate, 173.

An article by Lee Jackson appeared in the Gospel Advocate entitled: "Christian Church" Versus "Church of Christ." in the Gospel Advocate, Jan. 24, 1929, 87.

Lee Jackson's parents were L. D. Jackson who married Susanna Horn in 1852. She died at Jackson's Grove, Tallahatchie County, MS. --Gospel Advocate, Jan. 29, 1890, 15.
Gospel preacher. The following was written by M. H. Harmon in 1929:

Lee Jackson. My first meeting with Bro. Jackson was in McComb City when I held a revival there, about 1894. He was born at Mitchells Cross Roads, in Tallahatchie County about 73 years ago. He was educated in Mars Hill College, Florence, Alabama, under that matchless preacher, T. B. Larimore. Bro. Jackson has given nearly all his ministerial life to the cause in his native state. He has always had some peculiarities in his preaching, like a great many men, and I suppose wholly unconscious of it. Like the lamented Manire, you would soon forget the eccentricities of the speaker by being absorbed in what the speaker was saying. Bro. Jackson is a deep thinker, and original in his thoughts and preaching, and has given his entire life without reserve to building up the "weak places in Zion." He never got for his services in his life a tithe of what his ministry meant to those upon whom he gave his best efforts. He lives now, (1929) in Oakland, Mississippi.

Since writing the above tribute, Bro. Jackson has been called to his eternal reward. (H.) --- M. F. Harmon, History of The Christian Churches (Disciples of Christ) in Mississippi, 1929.

Lee Jackson by W.H. Owen.
We should not wait till after good men are dead to speak words of commendation of their character and work. I am glad that I told Brother Jackson during his life of my appreciation of him and of the benefit and encouragement I received from my acquaintance and association with him. Still, after such men are gone from us, it is natural that their virtues come fresh in our memories, and proper that expression be given to reflections along these lines. One of the elements of greatness in the character of Brother Jackson was humility. He never sought to be in the limelight and few recognized the extent of his ability. He went about his work in a quiet and unassuming way and never tried to impress people with the superiority of his own attainments. As a clear thinker, a deep reasoner, and a forceful writer, he had few equals and possibly no superiors. He could not boast of college degrees. He was the kind of man that did not have to depend on colleges for scholarship. He was a student all of his life and was well versed in several branches of learning, especially New Testament history. I doubt if a man can be found who has a clearer conception of the New Testament church or is more familiar with its history. He did a large amount of research in that particular field, and his findings constitute a real contribution to religious literature. It is a pity they were not more widely published. In his humble way he did what he could to counteract the evil tendency toward a sectarian spirit and the denominational use of the name, "church of Christ." The writer is indebted to him much for a better understanding along these lines. Brother Jackson's character might be summed up in these few words: He possessed qualities of mind and heart that placed him above the level of the average man. Feb. 21, 1929, Gospel Advocate, 173.

An article by Lee Jackson appeared in the Gospel Advocate entitled: "Christian Church" Versus "Church of Christ." in the Gospel Advocate, Jan. 24, 1929, 87.

Lee Jackson's parents were L. D. Jackson who married Susanna Horn in 1852. She died at Jackson's Grove, Tallahatchie County, MS. --Gospel Advocate, Jan. 29, 1890, 15.