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Rev Norman Nash

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Rev Norman Nash

Birth
Ellington, Tolland County, Connecticut, USA
Death
11 Nov 1870 (aged 79)
Port Huron, St. Clair County, Michigan, USA
Burial
Port Huron, St. Clair County, Michigan, USA Add to Map
Plot
Block B
Memorial ID
View Source
Rev Norman Nash descended from Thomas Nash, who came from London in 1637 with his family, and settled in what is now New Haven, Conn. Norman was the youngest of thirteen children. His father Ebenezer Nash, of Long Meadow, Mass married Susannah Hills of North Bolton, (now Vermont) Conn, and finally settled in Ellington, Conn. Where Norman was born November 17, 1790. About 1820 he began his ministerial labors as missionary in Hampshire County, Virginia; having been ordained as an Episcopal Deacon by the Rt Rev. Richard C. Moore and labored so hard in mountainous region that his health failed. He was afterward ordained by Rt Rev William White D.D. and preached in Huntingdon, Penn., after which he entered upon missionary work at Green Bay, Wis. and was engaged teaching Menominee Indians. From 1830 to 1834 he preached in Swedesboro, N.J. During those labors he assisted in the education of three of his nephews for the Episcopal ministry, who are located as follows: The Rev Francis B. Nash, at Tiskilwa,Ill; The Rev Rudolphus Nash at Worthington, Ohio; The Rev. Norman Badger, now Chaplain in the United States Army.
In 1835 or 1836 Dr. Nash was appointed by President Jackson as a missionary and teacher among the indians, then at Port Huron, The Chippewas and Ottawas. With a salary of $400 per year. In July 1836, Dr. McCoskry was made Bishop of the (then new) diocese of Michigan adn owing to a unfortunate misunderstanding between the Indian agent, H.R. Schoolcraft, who was stationed at Mackinac, and the Bishop on the one side, and Dr. Nash upon the other, regarding the channel through which he was to receive his salary, he refused to receive from the Bishop the amount due him, and persisted in his refusal to the time of his death. The Indians were soon after removed to neutral ground, and the Doctor devoted himself, in an independent way to the wants of the community. He had regular appointments for religious worship at Fort Gratiot, Clyde Mills and Sturges' schoolhouses, and also other places, at different times. He was universally beloved and respected by those who knew him, and was frequently called upon to perform marriage ceremonies and also serve as a physician. He never afterward connected himself with the church, but marked out his own sphere of labor and followed it. This old resident died November 11, 1870.
Rev Norman Nash descended from Thomas Nash, who came from London in 1637 with his family, and settled in what is now New Haven, Conn. Norman was the youngest of thirteen children. His father Ebenezer Nash, of Long Meadow, Mass married Susannah Hills of North Bolton, (now Vermont) Conn, and finally settled in Ellington, Conn. Where Norman was born November 17, 1790. About 1820 he began his ministerial labors as missionary in Hampshire County, Virginia; having been ordained as an Episcopal Deacon by the Rt Rev. Richard C. Moore and labored so hard in mountainous region that his health failed. He was afterward ordained by Rt Rev William White D.D. and preached in Huntingdon, Penn., after which he entered upon missionary work at Green Bay, Wis. and was engaged teaching Menominee Indians. From 1830 to 1834 he preached in Swedesboro, N.J. During those labors he assisted in the education of three of his nephews for the Episcopal ministry, who are located as follows: The Rev Francis B. Nash, at Tiskilwa,Ill; The Rev Rudolphus Nash at Worthington, Ohio; The Rev. Norman Badger, now Chaplain in the United States Army.
In 1835 or 1836 Dr. Nash was appointed by President Jackson as a missionary and teacher among the indians, then at Port Huron, The Chippewas and Ottawas. With a salary of $400 per year. In July 1836, Dr. McCoskry was made Bishop of the (then new) diocese of Michigan adn owing to a unfortunate misunderstanding between the Indian agent, H.R. Schoolcraft, who was stationed at Mackinac, and the Bishop on the one side, and Dr. Nash upon the other, regarding the channel through which he was to receive his salary, he refused to receive from the Bishop the amount due him, and persisted in his refusal to the time of his death. The Indians were soon after removed to neutral ground, and the Doctor devoted himself, in an independent way to the wants of the community. He had regular appointments for religious worship at Fort Gratiot, Clyde Mills and Sturges' schoolhouses, and also other places, at different times. He was universally beloved and respected by those who knew him, and was frequently called upon to perform marriage ceremonies and also serve as a physician. He never afterward connected himself with the church, but marked out his own sphere of labor and followed it. This old resident died November 11, 1870.


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