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Ralph Truman Black

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Ralph Truman Black

Birth
Ashley County, Arkansas, USA
Death
18 Jan 1942 (aged 25)
Burial
Hamburg, Ashley County, Arkansas, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Ralph Truman Black, 26, was reported missing in the sinking of the oil tanker Alan Jackson off the coast of Norfolk, VA, on Sunday morning January 18, 1942, and was given up by the Navy as lost at sea. He had served in the U. S. Navy for three years before joining the marine department of Standard Oil Company.

He left Baton Rouge, LA, his home base, on Christmas Day and then talked from Norfolk, VA, with his mother saying he was going to be out of the United States. The Alan Jackson sank after being torpedoed with only 13 out of the crew of 26 surviving, and some of them suffering serious injuries. He was born in Ashley County and educated in Bastrop and Monroe, LA. He was the grandson of Rev. and Mrs. Adolphus Jarvis of Hamburg. His tombstone at the Antioch Cemetery includes an engraving of a ship, with USS Alan Jackson, and the inscription, "He Died as He Lived... A Brave Soldier."


On January 18, 1942, the unarmed tanker Alan Jackson was proceeding independently without routing instructions about 60 miles ENE of Diamond Shoals, North Carolina, when she was hit by two torpedoes from U-66 at 0833. The first hit the starboard side forward of the bridge in the forward tank and the second hit the starboard side aft of the deckhouse between #2 & #3 tanks and broke the ship into about 25 feet forward of the midship house, nearly in line with the foremast. This caused both parts of the burning tanker to sink within 10 minutes. Flaming oil spewed from the tanker's side and spread over the water hundreds of feet around the ship, making it hazardous for the crew to abandon ship. Many of the men burned to death because only the #3 boat with eight men could be launched. Five men jumped into the water and clung to wreckage. The lifeboat picked up the radio operator after 15 minutes. Destroyer USS Roe picked up the 2nd mate, the 3rd mate and an able seaman four hours later. The destroyer then picked up the occupants of the lifeboat and found the master after seven hours in the water. On 19 January, all survivors were landed at Norfolk, Virginia. Of the eight officers and 27 men aboard, only three officers and 10 men survived, eight of them injured
Ralph Truman Black, 26, was reported missing in the sinking of the oil tanker Alan Jackson off the coast of Norfolk, VA, on Sunday morning January 18, 1942, and was given up by the Navy as lost at sea. He had served in the U. S. Navy for three years before joining the marine department of Standard Oil Company.

He left Baton Rouge, LA, his home base, on Christmas Day and then talked from Norfolk, VA, with his mother saying he was going to be out of the United States. The Alan Jackson sank after being torpedoed with only 13 out of the crew of 26 surviving, and some of them suffering serious injuries. He was born in Ashley County and educated in Bastrop and Monroe, LA. He was the grandson of Rev. and Mrs. Adolphus Jarvis of Hamburg. His tombstone at the Antioch Cemetery includes an engraving of a ship, with USS Alan Jackson, and the inscription, "He Died as He Lived... A Brave Soldier."


On January 18, 1942, the unarmed tanker Alan Jackson was proceeding independently without routing instructions about 60 miles ENE of Diamond Shoals, North Carolina, when she was hit by two torpedoes from U-66 at 0833. The first hit the starboard side forward of the bridge in the forward tank and the second hit the starboard side aft of the deckhouse between #2 & #3 tanks and broke the ship into about 25 feet forward of the midship house, nearly in line with the foremast. This caused both parts of the burning tanker to sink within 10 minutes. Flaming oil spewed from the tanker's side and spread over the water hundreds of feet around the ship, making it hazardous for the crew to abandon ship. Many of the men burned to death because only the #3 boat with eight men could be launched. Five men jumped into the water and clung to wreckage. The lifeboat picked up the radio operator after 15 minutes. Destroyer USS Roe picked up the 2nd mate, the 3rd mate and an able seaman four hours later. The destroyer then picked up the occupants of the lifeboat and found the master after seven hours in the water. On 19 January, all survivors were landed at Norfolk, Virginia. Of the eight officers and 27 men aboard, only three officers and 10 men survived, eight of them injured

Bio by: Sandra


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He died as he lived -- a brave soldier.



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