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 Jules Gustaf “'The Mayor of Georgetown'” Maes

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Jules Gustaf “'The Mayor of Georgetown'” Maes

Birth
Belgium
Death 25 Oct 1939 (aged 72)
Seattle, King County, Washington, USA
Burial Seattle, King County, Washington, USA
Plot Section 15, Lot 95, Site 10/11
Memorial ID 54018841 View Source

Jules Maes was born in Belgium in 1867, the son of Charles and Seraphine Maes. He was the oldest of fourteen children. In 1892 he emigrated to the United States, settling first in the Upper Northwest. By 1902 he was in Seattle, where he first appears in Seattle directories; his occupation listed as bartender for August Ozar, a saloon owner in South Park. He worked hard and learned fast and by the next year he is listed as co-owner (with August Ozar and John Monteville) of the same business. In 1905 Jules returned to Belgium, where he married Leonie Vehulst and together they returned to Seattle. Between 1906 and 1908 it appears that Jules Maes decided to go it alone and opened The Maple Leaf Saloon in Van Asselt. In 1912 he sold the Maple Leaf Saloon and bought the Rainier Bar at 5953 Duwamish Avenue (now Airport Way) where he offered wines, liquors, and cigars for sale. When Prohibition began in Washington State on January 1, 1916 the business changed as well, and the patrons could enjoy billiards, soft drinks, cigars, and a good meal. It was in the early 1920s that the name of the business changed to "Jules Maes," and in 1937 he moved his business to 5919 Airport Way. Two years after the move, he passed away. Leonie then became the president of Jules Maes, in partnership with Jules' youngest brother Valentine Maes and Valentine's brother-in-law Remi Kerkof. In 1949 Leonie passed away; she is buried next to her husband in the Calvary Cemetery. Throughout his life, Jules Maes was known to be fair and generous. During the depression, he was always willing to help a fellow out with a loan, many of which went unpaid as evidenced by a number of intact IOUs found after his death. In the course of nearly four decades that he was a member of the Georgetown community, the respect for his character and contributions was so high that he earned the nickname "The Mayor of Georgetown."
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Morning Olympian December 6, 1913
The supreme court affirms the King county superior court in the case of R. E. Jones against Jules Maes. Maes testified that when Georgetown was annexed as a part of Seattle, that there were thirteen saloons there and only ten could be allowed to continue in business. At a meeting of the saloon men three agreed to drop out, for which they were to be paid $500 each by the other saloon men. Two of them were paid the money due but Maes refused to give the Connella Brothers their money. They assigned their claim to Jones and the suit resulted. The supreme court says the money must be paid, declaring that the saloon men drooped out of business and that the same was ample consideration for the money.
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Seattle Daily Times - March 21, 1933 - Good Old Days! Georgetown 'Remembers When' Brewery Means Prosperity

There Jules Maes drew a tall one from the tap, flicked the collar off it expertly with a strip of celluloid and set it up on the bar.
"Have a beer on the house," he said, "while we talk about the old brewery days in Georgetown."
Effortlessly he whipped out his towel to catch up one or two vagrant drops on the smooth mahogany of his counter, then picked up a glass and began mechanically to polish it in the age-old tradition of tenders at the bar.
"You're going to be disappointed," he said, "if you think that's real beer, because it isn't. I've been a bartender more than thirty years, more than twenty years here in Georgetown right across the street from the old brew house and stock house and I haven't sold a drop of alcoholic liquor since prohibition. There are not many old bartenders can say that, truthfully.
"You ask me if the old brewery whistle will be blowing again soon. All I can say is I sure hope so. It would be the sweetest music I've heard in sixteen years.
"I used to run the Maple Leaf Bar down about where the second hangar is at the airport. Then I came up here and started the Rainier Saloon. That was in the days when Georgetown was a separate city, completely surrounded by Seattle. Seattle had a Sunday closing law. We didn't, I never will forget our Sunday business here for the few months before our City Council shut us down too. Every street car from the city was packed. The boys were standing in front of the bars six-deep.
"But, of course, that sort of thing won't come back. No one wants it to come back. But I'd like to serve real beer again.
Best Beer on Coast
"The year before the brewery closed it had 800 men on its payroll. The Seattle Brewing and Malting Company put out the best beer on the Pacific Coast. It was a premium beer in the East. You paid a fancy price for it. They put out 350,000 barrels that year. The government got $1.50 a barrel tax.
""Start up that brewery again, give us back our race track and watch Georgetown sprint ahead!"
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Seattle Daily Times - August 5, 1926 25 More Object To Death Penalty And Are Excused . . . Scruples against capital punishment caused the removal of . . . Jules Maes.
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Seattle Daily Times - Mar 5, 1934 - Liquor Permits
to: Jules Maes, 5953 Airport Way, beer by bottle.
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Seattle Daily Times November 11, 1934
Advertisement under 'Billiard Parlors & Card Rooms'
Rainier Pool Room, Jules Maes, prop. 5953 Airport Way. Also lunch room.
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Incorporations September 15, 1936
Olympia, Tuesday, September 15, 1936 -
The Jules Maes Inc., of Seattle, capitalized at $10,000, also was incorporated, to engage in a general restaurant and café business. Jules Maes, Valentine Maes and Remi Kerkof were the incorporators.
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Seattle Daily Times - March 25, 1949 59 Receive Permits In Seattle
The Washington State Liquor Control Board this afternoon issued 235 liquor-by-the drink licenses -- the first under Initiative No. 171 -- and a member of the board said the serving could began as early as Monday night. . . Seattle licenses included: . . . Jules Maes & Co. 5919 Airport Way.
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Seattle Daily Times - January 3, 1965 The Days of Real Sport
. . . Vic Weston, another old time soccer and diamond performer, reminisced yesterday about Woehrle's start in baseball.
"A bunch of us got together in the back room of Jules Maes in 1920 and formed the Georgetown Merchants baseball team."


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