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George Reid Bethurum Sr.

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George Reid Bethurum Sr.

Birth
Thompsons Station, Williamson County, Tennessee, USA
Death
25 Jul 1962 (aged 94)
Tennessee, USA
Burial
Franklin, Williamson County, Tennessee, USA Add to Map
Plot
A103
Memorial ID
View Source
Gospel preacher listed in Preachers of Today, Vol. 1, 1952, 36.

"The white-haired man with the jovial smile and twinkle in his eyes no longer occupies the second-row-left-center-section-pew at the Belmont Avenue church, for he has gone home to glory. On July 25, 1962, George R. Bethurum, Sr., beloved father and elder, preacher and teacher in the church of our Lord, passed from this life. Brother Bethurum's long life of more than ninety-four years began on April 11, 1868, at Thompson Station, Williamson County, where he spent many hours of his boyhood days playing with Confederate money. His formal education was climaxed by two years of study at the College of the Bible (Transylvania), where he studied under the renowned J. W. McGarvey, whom he often quoted in his preaching and teaching. For more than forty years of his adult life, he worked as a sales representative for Bayless Brothers, Louisville and Eichenhouser Coffee Company, New York. In 1896 he married Mamie Sinclair, who was his helpmeet for more than sixty-two years. To this union were born five children who now survive him: John C., Mrs. Ray Jordan (Jeanette), George Reid, Jr., all of Nashville; Dorothy of New London, Conn., and Douglas of Greenville, S. C. In 1884, three years after his baptism by E. G. Sewell, Brother Bethurum began his ministry of preaching and teaching which extended over an era of more than seventy-five years. At the time of his death he had been preaching the gospel longer than any other living man. In 1915 he came to the newly established Belmont Avenue congregation (Nashville), which he actively served as elder, Sunday school teacher, and often preacher for forty-six years. During the last years of his life he lived at the Lakeshore Home for the Aged, where, in addition to his continued teaching at Belmont, he taught Bible classes and gave morning lectures. Brother Bethurum attributed his longevity to daily physical exercise and active participation in competitive sports. He was an avid player of croquet--a game to which he devoted many afternoon hours and in which he excelled. He long will be remembered by those whose lives he touched. The congregation at Belmont appreciated him for his deep sense of piety, reverence and humility which characterized his teaching and every prayer he led for the congregation. He was a deeply religious man who enjoyed a long, rich, full life. His great achievement in life perhaps was best expressed by one of his fellow members at Belmont who said."By the twinkle in his eyes" you could tell "he had found the secret of life." --- Paul D. Phillips. Gospel Advocate, August 30, 1962, page 650.
Gospel preacher listed in Preachers of Today, Vol. 1, 1952, 36.

"The white-haired man with the jovial smile and twinkle in his eyes no longer occupies the second-row-left-center-section-pew at the Belmont Avenue church, for he has gone home to glory. On July 25, 1962, George R. Bethurum, Sr., beloved father and elder, preacher and teacher in the church of our Lord, passed from this life. Brother Bethurum's long life of more than ninety-four years began on April 11, 1868, at Thompson Station, Williamson County, where he spent many hours of his boyhood days playing with Confederate money. His formal education was climaxed by two years of study at the College of the Bible (Transylvania), where he studied under the renowned J. W. McGarvey, whom he often quoted in his preaching and teaching. For more than forty years of his adult life, he worked as a sales representative for Bayless Brothers, Louisville and Eichenhouser Coffee Company, New York. In 1896 he married Mamie Sinclair, who was his helpmeet for more than sixty-two years. To this union were born five children who now survive him: John C., Mrs. Ray Jordan (Jeanette), George Reid, Jr., all of Nashville; Dorothy of New London, Conn., and Douglas of Greenville, S. C. In 1884, three years after his baptism by E. G. Sewell, Brother Bethurum began his ministry of preaching and teaching which extended over an era of more than seventy-five years. At the time of his death he had been preaching the gospel longer than any other living man. In 1915 he came to the newly established Belmont Avenue congregation (Nashville), which he actively served as elder, Sunday school teacher, and often preacher for forty-six years. During the last years of his life he lived at the Lakeshore Home for the Aged, where, in addition to his continued teaching at Belmont, he taught Bible classes and gave morning lectures. Brother Bethurum attributed his longevity to daily physical exercise and active participation in competitive sports. He was an avid player of croquet--a game to which he devoted many afternoon hours and in which he excelled. He long will be remembered by those whose lives he touched. The congregation at Belmont appreciated him for his deep sense of piety, reverence and humility which characterized his teaching and every prayer he led for the congregation. He was a deeply religious man who enjoyed a long, rich, full life. His great achievement in life perhaps was best expressed by one of his fellow members at Belmont who said."By the twinkle in his eyes" you could tell "he had found the secret of life." --- Paul D. Phillips. Gospel Advocate, August 30, 1962, page 650.


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