The Photo Request has been fulfilled.

 
 Alexander Wright

Alexander Wright

Birth
Scotland
Death 3 Aug 1876 (aged 72)
Virgin, Washington County, Utah, USA
Burial Virgin, Washington County, Utah, USA
Plot Block G Plot 184
Memorial ID 52165 · View Source
Suggest Edits

Son of William Wright and Ann Wilson

Married Hannah Butterfield, 25 May 1844, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois.

One child.

Married Hannah Leigh Walters, 23 Nov 1856.

Children: Sarah Ann, Alexander, Elizabeth Jean, William Walters, Hannah May and John Edmond.

LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 3, p. 571,

Wright, Alexander, one of the first Latter-day Saint missionaries who introduced the fulness of the gospel into Scotland, was born Jan. 27, 1804, in the parish of Marnoch, Banffshire, Scotland. In 1835 he emigrated to Canada, where he became a convert to "'Mormonism," being baptized in 1836. Soon afterwards he moved to Kirtland, Ohio, and was ordained to the Priesthood. Early in 1839 he was called on a mission to Scotland. Complying with this call he left Springfield, Ohio, March 14, 1839, accompanied by Henry C. Jacobs, Jesse Haven and others. Their destination was New York and they traveled on foot at the rate of twenty or twenty-five miles a day, preaching and visiting by the way. Arriving in New York late in the summer, they waited there for the arrival of some of the Twelve coming from the west. About this time Samuel Mulliner joined Elder Wright, having just arrived from the headquarters of the Church. Before sailing, they labored in the regions around about New York, visiting both Saints and strangers, until they had obtained sufficient means to enable them to pay their passage across the water. They sailed from New York Nov. 6, 1839, and arrived in Liverpool Dec. 3, 1839. After visiting the brethren and Saints in Liverpool and Preston, and conferring with Willard Richards, Joseph Fielding and others, they left Liverpool for Scotland Dec. 19, 1839, arriving in Glasgow the following day. On the 21st they went by canal-boat to Edinburgh, where Elder Mulliner's parents lived. After a brief stay there, Elder Wright became desirous of visiting his parents, who lived in Banffshire, in the north of Scotland. Being unable to find a boat leaving for the north (the boats having been withdrawn for the season), he set out on foot, crossing the Firth of Forth to Kirkcaldy. He persevered on his journey, visiting Dundee on the road. Being exposed to the weather, and finding shelter where he could, he was taken sick, but did not fully realize what ailed him until he reached Aberdeen, where he consulted some druggist friends and found that he was suffering from smallpox. Nothing daunted, he proceeded, after resting a day or two, to his father's house, sick as he was. Once there he rested, and in the course of a few days he was well again. Elder Wright visited his friends and relatives in that part of the country and also in the city of Aberdeen, preaching where-ever he could find a place to do so, and bearing testimony of the restoration of the gospel through Joseph Smith. In the meantime Elder Mulliner had been laboring at Bishopton, near Glasgow, and had there baptized Alexander Hay and his wife Jan. 14, 1840; they were the first to embrace the fulness of the gospel in Scotland in this dispensation, being the first fruits of the Elders in that land. At this time Elder Mulliner wrote to Elder Wright, requesting him to join him at Bishopton. Elder Wright very shortly left the north to join his companion, traveling all the way south to Edinburgh, as he had done north to Banff, on foot. He used every opportunity to proclaim his mission on the way, at Dundee and elsewhere. When he reached Edinburgh he found Elder Mulliner there, visiting his parents. They remained in that city a brief season, during which they became acquainted with two men (Gillispie and McKenzie) at Leith, who were both baptized Feb. 2, 1840. Elders Wright and Mulliner then started for Glasgow by canalboat and arrived at Bishopton the following day. Their conjoint labors now commenced in earnest, and they held meetings in Kilpatrick, Bishtopton, Bridge-of-Weir, Paisley, Kilmarcomb, Johnstone, Houston, 'Kilbarchan, Glasgow and other places. It appears that their presentation of the gospel brought a ready response, for a number of persons were soon afterwards baptized. In fact baptisms soon became a daily occurrence, and by the close of April, 1840, upwards of sixty persons had been led into the waters of baptism. Early in May, 1840, Elder Orson Pratt arrived in Paisley and on May 8, 1840, the Paisley branch (the first branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Scotland) was organized with Robert McArthur as president. The work now spread rapidly, additional branches being organized at Bridge-of-Weir, Bishopton and Greenock. Soon after organizing the Paisley branch, Elder Orson Pratt went to Edinburgh, accompanied by Elder Mulliner, and established a branch of the Church there. Elder Mulliner returned to America in the fall of 1840, but Elder Wright continued his work and was the means of bringing many into the Church. In August, September and October, 1840, he labored in Aberdeen, Banff, Macduff, Portsoy and other places, endeavoring to spread a knowledge of the gospel among his relatives and among the people generally, but the work of introducing the gospel into this northern part of Scotland was slow. Much difficulty was experienced in obtaining places to hold meetings, except where extortionate prices were asked, which Elder Wright was unable to pay. When he arrived in Aberdeen he had only 13 1/2 pence in his pocket. He persevered diligently, seeking conversations everywhere, loaning books for the people to read, maintaining himself as best he could, traveling continuously. From sheer necessity he occasionally sought labor where he could find it, in order to buy himself a pair of shoes or to buy books, etc., with which to enable him to persue his labors. On one occasion he slept in a field on some shocks of grain; on another he slept on some rocks on the sea shore. Returning from the north in October, he immediately resumed his labors in the Paisley district, working there during that winter and until the next summer, baptizing converts every few days. In the summer of 1841 he returned to the north, taking up labors there again and covering the country pretty much from Aberdeen to Inverness. Many friends were made and some interest manifested, but results were slow at that time. The people were very excited just then over religious differences and difficulties existing among them, which shortly after culminated in the disruption of the Church of Scotland, when the Free Church of Scotland drew away from the established Church. Elder Wright spent the winter of 1841-1842 and the following spring in the north. Early in the summer of 1842 his father's family concluded to emigrate to America; most of the family were inquiring after truth and were favorably disposed toward the restored gospel. Later a number of them joined the Church. Elder Wright arranged for seventeen passages for his relatives and with them he sailed from Liverpool Sept. 17, 1842, on the ship "Sydney." After a long voyage, during which several deaths occurred, they arrived at the mouth of the Mississippi, whence they proceeded up the river on the steamboat "Alexander Scott," and were much delayed by the boat going aground. At last they reached Altoona, Dec. 19, 1842, where they stayed temporarily. Elder Wright was thus some two years and nine months away on this mission. He soon afterwards became a resident of Nauvoo, Ill., where he married Hannah Butterfield, May 25, 1844. A daughter, who died soon afterwards, was born to them; the wife died in childbirth. Brother Wright passed through the persecutions in Illinois and became an exile, together with his people, in 1846. In 1847 he crossed the plains to Great Salt Lake Valley, driving a team for President John Taylor on the journey. In January, 1851, he married Hannah Leigh in Salt Salt Lake City, by whom he had two children, Mary Elizabeth and Hannah Ann. After living for some time near Pioneer Square, Salt Lake City, he moved out into the country in the spring of 1853, locating near where Wandemere Park now stands. He lived there until he went south on a colonization mission to Dixie, where he settled on the Rio Virgen, at Virgen City. In 1856 (Nov. 23d) Elder Wright married Hannah Walters, by whom he had six children, namely, Sarah Ann, Alexander, Elizabeth Jean, William Walters, Hannah May and John Edmond. Bro. Wright continued a resident of Virgen City until the time of his death, which occurred Aug. 3, 1876, at Virgen City, after an illness of about seven years. He left a wife and six children.



Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

  • Maintained by: SMSmith
  • Originally Created by: Utah State Historical Society
  • Added: 2 Feb 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 52165
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Alexander Wright (27 Jan 1804–3 Aug 1876), Find A Grave Memorial no. 52165, citing Virgin Cemetery, Virgin, Washington County, Utah, USA ; Maintained by SMSmith (contributor 46491005) .