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Martha “Mattie” <I>Coffin</I> Taaffe

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Martha “Mattie” Coffin Taaffe

Birth
Saint Louis, St. Louis City, Missouri, USA
Death
11 Sep 1957 (aged 89)
Jasper County, Missouri, USA
Burial
Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri, USA Add to Map
Plot
Bl 10 Lot 14 Sp 1
Memorial ID
View Source
Martha 'Mattie' Coffin Taaffe

d/o Tristram Coffin and Mary Degge Coffin
Wife of Richard Taaffe (widowed)
Married: June 1, 1887, Carthage, MO

MATERNAL GRANDPARENTS:
W. H. F. Degge
Caroline Burd Degge

Sister to:
Arthur O. Coffin
Pearl Coffin
Frank Tristram Coffin

Her death certificate reported that she died at age 89 from a pulmonary embolism and arteriosclerotic heart disease. She had also suffered from a fractured hip for the 5 months prior to her death.
The death certificate can be viewed at Missouri Digital Archives/death certificates online website.

*************************************

MARTHA COFFIN TAAFFE

Martha Coffin Taaffe was born in St. Louis on March 18, 1868 to Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Coffin. When Martha was four years old, her parents and her mother's parents, Mr. and Mrs. William H. Degge, moved to Sarcoxie, Missouri. Later the family moved to Carthage, Missouri, where there were better facilities for Martha's education.
Martha graduated from Carthage High School in 1887 and the following week, on June 1, 1887 she married Richard Taaffe, an Adams Express agent in Carthage. A year later he became a Frisco agent at Ellsworth, Kansas. They returned to Carthage three years later.
The couple had two sons, William Franklin Taaffe, who died in 1897, and George Richard Taaffe, who died in 1943. Mr. Taaffe died June, 4, 1924. Both he and Martha are buried in Park Cemetery in Carthage.

Martha Coffin Taaffe became known for her work as a suffrage leader. She helped organize the Carthage Suffrage League in 1914 and also served on the board of the Missouri Suffrage League.
In 1920, when the vote for women came, Mrs. Taaffe attended the national convention of the Democratic party as one of the women delegates-at-large from Missouri. There she met Franklin D. Roosevelt, who was then a candidate for Vice President of the United States.

Active in the Democratic party, Mrs. Taaffe ran for a seat in the Missouri House of Representatives in 1926. She opposed another Carthaginian, Emma Knell, who she defeated in that election.
Mrs. Taaffe became a member of the Cosmos Club in 1907 and participated in many of it's activities. She was the oldest member at the time of her death in 1957.
In 1935, she assisted in the establishment of the Junior Cosmos Club, and Mrs. Richard Jansen served as the first president of that organization. through the years, Mrs. Taaffe presented many papers for the club, including one entitled "Blitzkriegs in History". She also wrote poetry, and one of her poems was "The Drowth of 1936".

In 1912, as a representative of Cosmos, Mrs. Taaffe presided at the meeting to organize a Woman's Civic League, and she served on the by-laws committee for the League.
As a member of the League, Mrs. Taaffe proved instrumental in the rebuilding of the former almshouse, now Fair Acres. She became involved with placing the fountain in Central Park, and she worked on a campaign to require the wrapping of bread sold commercially in Carthage.
She chaired the committee on decorations for a food fair in February 1912. This fair, held at the courthouse for a full week, was a combined effort of the Women's League and the Business Men's League.

Interested in international affairs and a supporter of the United Nations, Mrs. Taaffe served as a member of the International Study Group, which supported the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies. She was one of four delegates to the Fourth American Peace Conference in April 1913 in St. Louis. She visited the White House on several occasions for teas given by Mrs. Roosevelt for women gathered for Conferences on the Cause and Cure for Wars.

A member of the old Chautauqua Club, Mrs. Taaffe joined the Missouri Federation of Women's Clubs (MWFC) in 1908 and served in every office of the Missouri board except president. As historian of the board, she later wrote a history of the first forty-six years of the organization. The state federation presented her with a plaque for her work through the years. she also chaired the conservation department of MFWC and was a contributing editor for the Missouri Woman when Emily Newell Blair served as editor.

Mrs. Taaffe also held memberships in the United Daughters of the Confederacy and Fortnightly Study Club. For a number of years, she served on the Carthage Public Library board. In addition, she was a communicant of Grace Episcopal Church. She died September 11, 1957 in Carthage, Missouri.

source: Show Me Missouri Women, Vol 2 page 177
article by Eleanor Coffield

_________________________________

CARTHAGE EVENING PRESS
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1957

MRS. MARTHA TAAFFE DEAD
PROMINENT CARTHAGE CLUB WOMAN WAS 89

A Pioneer in Suffrage Cause and Also Was Democratic Leader-Two Grandchildren Survive


Mrs. Martha Taaffe, 89, prominent Carthage woman and a leader for many years in state and local club work and in Democratic women's politics, died at 11:15 this morning at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Everett Sweet on the West Fairview Road.

She had been bedfast since last April 11 when she suffered a fractured hip and was a patient in McCune-Brooks hospital until July 8 when she was moved to the Sweet home.

Mrs. Taaffe, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Coffin was born in St. Louis March 18, 1868. The Coffin family and Mrs. Taaffe's grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. William H. Degge, came to Sarcoxie when the daughter, Martha, was four years old and later the two families moved in Carthage where educational facilities were better.
Mrs. Taaffe attended the Carthage public school-- in later years the old Central school, on the site of the present high school.

MARRIED R. TAAFFE IN 1887
On June 1, 1887 a week after graduation from high school, Martha Coffin was married to Richard Taaffe, Adams Express agent here. A year later he became Frisco agent at Ellsworth, Kansas and he and Mrs. Taaffe made that city their home three years, returning in 1891 to Carthage. Mr. Taaffe having been named Frisco agent here. Later Mr. Taaffe entered the milling business with the late S. O. Morrow, father of S. R. Morrow, W. T. Morrow and Homer Morrow, prominent Carthage business men.

Like many other Carthage women of earlier days, Mrs. Taaffe was a member of the old Chautauqua club. In 1904 she became a member of the Missouri Federation of Women's clubs and was prominent in it's programs and other activities until the last few years. She served as first vice president of the State Federation two different terms and was it's treasurer a number of years. Later Mrs. Taaffe held the office of historian and wrote a history of the Missouri Federation of Women's clubs, considered a most valuable publication.
She was presented a framed plaque by the state federation for her work in that organization. Mrs. Taaffe was quite proud of this gift.
During the early years of her club work Mrs. Taaffe participated in many civic affairs of Carthage, which began as a member of the old Carthage Civic League. She was instrumental in rebuilding of what is now Fair Acres, the former almshouse and placing the fountain in Central park and took a prominent part in cleaning up groceries here and the campaign to bring about the wrapping of commercially sold bread.

A SUFFRAGE LEADER
In 1914 she was interested in the organization of the Carthage Suffrage League and served on the board of the Missouri Suffrage League, in 1920 when the vote for women came, Mrs. Taaffe, a staunch Democrat, attended the national convention of that party in San Francisco, California, serving as one of the women delegates at large from Missouri. It was there she met Franklin D. Roosevelt, candidate for vice president of the United States. Later she met him several times when he was president of the United States when she attended teas Mrs. Roosevelt gave at the White House for women gathered for Conferences on the Cause and Cure of Wars.
Mrs. Taaffe was student of international affairs and a staunch supporter of the United Nations.
She served a number of years a a member of the public library board.
Mrs. Taaffe became a member of the Cosmos club in 1907 and at the time of her passing was the eldest of the members. She was a member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and also for number of years of the Fortnightly Study Club.
She was a communicant of Grace Episcopal Church.

LAST OF HER FAMILY
Mr. Taaffe died June 3, 1924. Their eldest son, William Franklin Taaffe, died in 1897 and another son, George Richard Taaffe, died in 1913.

Surviving her are two grandchildren, Mrs. Frank ______ of Kansas City; George Richard Taaffe, Jr. of Houston, Texas, and several great-grandchildren.
Mrs. John R. Green of Independence, MO, formerly Mrs. George Taaffe of Joplin, and her daughter Mrs. Schusk will come to Carthage, tomorrow morning.

The body is at the Ulmer Funeral Home.
Funeral services will be held at the Grace Episcopal church and burial will be in Park Cemetery. Other arrangements have not been made. The family requests no flowers instead friends may give to Grace Church memorial fund by sending by sending gifts to W. W. Wright, treasurer.

Addendum to above list of relatives as shared by by her great-niece Theresa 'Terry' Walker

Martha had one other sibling. She was my great grandmother and Martha's sister. Her name was Blanche Coffin - McNair - Case - Lessard - Martin. She was born 24 Sep 1869. In St Louis, Missouri and died 31 Aug 1930 in Delight, Pike, Arkansas. She is buried at the Fredonia City Cemetery, Fredonia, Wilson, Kansas. Blanche was married 4 times.
Martha 'Mattie' Coffin Taaffe

d/o Tristram Coffin and Mary Degge Coffin
Wife of Richard Taaffe (widowed)
Married: June 1, 1887, Carthage, MO

MATERNAL GRANDPARENTS:
W. H. F. Degge
Caroline Burd Degge

Sister to:
Arthur O. Coffin
Pearl Coffin
Frank Tristram Coffin

Her death certificate reported that she died at age 89 from a pulmonary embolism and arteriosclerotic heart disease. She had also suffered from a fractured hip for the 5 months prior to her death.
The death certificate can be viewed at Missouri Digital Archives/death certificates online website.

*************************************

MARTHA COFFIN TAAFFE

Martha Coffin Taaffe was born in St. Louis on March 18, 1868 to Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Coffin. When Martha was four years old, her parents and her mother's parents, Mr. and Mrs. William H. Degge, moved to Sarcoxie, Missouri. Later the family moved to Carthage, Missouri, where there were better facilities for Martha's education.
Martha graduated from Carthage High School in 1887 and the following week, on June 1, 1887 she married Richard Taaffe, an Adams Express agent in Carthage. A year later he became a Frisco agent at Ellsworth, Kansas. They returned to Carthage three years later.
The couple had two sons, William Franklin Taaffe, who died in 1897, and George Richard Taaffe, who died in 1943. Mr. Taaffe died June, 4, 1924. Both he and Martha are buried in Park Cemetery in Carthage.

Martha Coffin Taaffe became known for her work as a suffrage leader. She helped organize the Carthage Suffrage League in 1914 and also served on the board of the Missouri Suffrage League.
In 1920, when the vote for women came, Mrs. Taaffe attended the national convention of the Democratic party as one of the women delegates-at-large from Missouri. There she met Franklin D. Roosevelt, who was then a candidate for Vice President of the United States.

Active in the Democratic party, Mrs. Taaffe ran for a seat in the Missouri House of Representatives in 1926. She opposed another Carthaginian, Emma Knell, who she defeated in that election.
Mrs. Taaffe became a member of the Cosmos Club in 1907 and participated in many of it's activities. She was the oldest member at the time of her death in 1957.
In 1935, she assisted in the establishment of the Junior Cosmos Club, and Mrs. Richard Jansen served as the first president of that organization. through the years, Mrs. Taaffe presented many papers for the club, including one entitled "Blitzkriegs in History". She also wrote poetry, and one of her poems was "The Drowth of 1936".

In 1912, as a representative of Cosmos, Mrs. Taaffe presided at the meeting to organize a Woman's Civic League, and she served on the by-laws committee for the League.
As a member of the League, Mrs. Taaffe proved instrumental in the rebuilding of the former almshouse, now Fair Acres. She became involved with placing the fountain in Central Park, and she worked on a campaign to require the wrapping of bread sold commercially in Carthage.
She chaired the committee on decorations for a food fair in February 1912. This fair, held at the courthouse for a full week, was a combined effort of the Women's League and the Business Men's League.

Interested in international affairs and a supporter of the United Nations, Mrs. Taaffe served as a member of the International Study Group, which supported the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies. She was one of four delegates to the Fourth American Peace Conference in April 1913 in St. Louis. She visited the White House on several occasions for teas given by Mrs. Roosevelt for women gathered for Conferences on the Cause and Cure for Wars.

A member of the old Chautauqua Club, Mrs. Taaffe joined the Missouri Federation of Women's Clubs (MWFC) in 1908 and served in every office of the Missouri board except president. As historian of the board, she later wrote a history of the first forty-six years of the organization. The state federation presented her with a plaque for her work through the years. she also chaired the conservation department of MFWC and was a contributing editor for the Missouri Woman when Emily Newell Blair served as editor.

Mrs. Taaffe also held memberships in the United Daughters of the Confederacy and Fortnightly Study Club. For a number of years, she served on the Carthage Public Library board. In addition, she was a communicant of Grace Episcopal Church. She died September 11, 1957 in Carthage, Missouri.

source: Show Me Missouri Women, Vol 2 page 177
article by Eleanor Coffield

_________________________________

CARTHAGE EVENING PRESS
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1957

MRS. MARTHA TAAFFE DEAD
PROMINENT CARTHAGE CLUB WOMAN WAS 89

A Pioneer in Suffrage Cause and Also Was Democratic Leader-Two Grandchildren Survive


Mrs. Martha Taaffe, 89, prominent Carthage woman and a leader for many years in state and local club work and in Democratic women's politics, died at 11:15 this morning at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Everett Sweet on the West Fairview Road.

She had been bedfast since last April 11 when she suffered a fractured hip and was a patient in McCune-Brooks hospital until July 8 when she was moved to the Sweet home.

Mrs. Taaffe, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Coffin was born in St. Louis March 18, 1868. The Coffin family and Mrs. Taaffe's grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. William H. Degge, came to Sarcoxie when the daughter, Martha, was four years old and later the two families moved in Carthage where educational facilities were better.
Mrs. Taaffe attended the Carthage public school-- in later years the old Central school, on the site of the present high school.

MARRIED R. TAAFFE IN 1887
On June 1, 1887 a week after graduation from high school, Martha Coffin was married to Richard Taaffe, Adams Express agent here. A year later he became Frisco agent at Ellsworth, Kansas and he and Mrs. Taaffe made that city their home three years, returning in 1891 to Carthage. Mr. Taaffe having been named Frisco agent here. Later Mr. Taaffe entered the milling business with the late S. O. Morrow, father of S. R. Morrow, W. T. Morrow and Homer Morrow, prominent Carthage business men.

Like many other Carthage women of earlier days, Mrs. Taaffe was a member of the old Chautauqua club. In 1904 she became a member of the Missouri Federation of Women's clubs and was prominent in it's programs and other activities until the last few years. She served as first vice president of the State Federation two different terms and was it's treasurer a number of years. Later Mrs. Taaffe held the office of historian and wrote a history of the Missouri Federation of Women's clubs, considered a most valuable publication.
She was presented a framed plaque by the state federation for her work in that organization. Mrs. Taaffe was quite proud of this gift.
During the early years of her club work Mrs. Taaffe participated in many civic affairs of Carthage, which began as a member of the old Carthage Civic League. She was instrumental in rebuilding of what is now Fair Acres, the former almshouse and placing the fountain in Central park and took a prominent part in cleaning up groceries here and the campaign to bring about the wrapping of commercially sold bread.

A SUFFRAGE LEADER
In 1914 she was interested in the organization of the Carthage Suffrage League and served on the board of the Missouri Suffrage League, in 1920 when the vote for women came, Mrs. Taaffe, a staunch Democrat, attended the national convention of that party in San Francisco, California, serving as one of the women delegates at large from Missouri. It was there she met Franklin D. Roosevelt, candidate for vice president of the United States. Later she met him several times when he was president of the United States when she attended teas Mrs. Roosevelt gave at the White House for women gathered for Conferences on the Cause and Cure of Wars.
Mrs. Taaffe was student of international affairs and a staunch supporter of the United Nations.
She served a number of years a a member of the public library board.
Mrs. Taaffe became a member of the Cosmos club in 1907 and at the time of her passing was the eldest of the members. She was a member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and also for number of years of the Fortnightly Study Club.
She was a communicant of Grace Episcopal Church.

LAST OF HER FAMILY
Mr. Taaffe died June 3, 1924. Their eldest son, William Franklin Taaffe, died in 1897 and another son, George Richard Taaffe, died in 1913.

Surviving her are two grandchildren, Mrs. Frank ______ of Kansas City; George Richard Taaffe, Jr. of Houston, Texas, and several great-grandchildren.
Mrs. John R. Green of Independence, MO, formerly Mrs. George Taaffe of Joplin, and her daughter Mrs. Schusk will come to Carthage, tomorrow morning.

The body is at the Ulmer Funeral Home.
Funeral services will be held at the Grace Episcopal church and burial will be in Park Cemetery. Other arrangements have not been made. The family requests no flowers instead friends may give to Grace Church memorial fund by sending by sending gifts to W. W. Wright, treasurer.

Addendum to above list of relatives as shared by by her great-niece Theresa 'Terry' Walker

Martha had one other sibling. She was my great grandmother and Martha's sister. Her name was Blanche Coffin - McNair - Case - Lessard - Martin. She was born 24 Sep 1869. In St Louis, Missouri and died 31 Aug 1930 in Delight, Pike, Arkansas. She is buried at the Fredonia City Cemetery, Fredonia, Wilson, Kansas. Blanche was married 4 times.


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  • Maintained by: D Snyder
  • Originally Created by: NJBrewer
  • Added: May 5, 2010
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/52045185/martha-taaffe: accessed ), memorial page for Martha “Mattie” Coffin Taaffe (18 Mar 1868–11 Sep 1957), Find a Grave Memorial ID 52045185, citing Park Cemetery, Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri, USA; Maintained by D Snyder (contributor 47280500).