John E. D'Arc

John E. D'Arc

Birth
New York, USA
Death 3 Jan 1999 (aged 60)
Riverside, Riverside County, California, USA
Burial Calimesa, Riverside County, California, USA
Plot VES 198-B
Memorial ID 51743531 · View Source
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John D'Arc, 60, singer, actor in Inland area:
Veteran actor and singer John D'Arc died Sunday while working on a new show at the Riverside Community Players Theatre. The cause of death is unknown pending a doctor's report.
Mr. D'Arc, 60, was last seen in the role of Uncle Billy in the Riverside cast member to die within the past month. Ed Parry, who played the angel Clarence, died Dec. 10.
Mr. D'Arc had been signed by the Riverside Community Players to direct a new production of the Herb Gardner comedy "A Thousand Clowns" and was at the 14th Street playhouse arranging production details with technical director Sigrid Wolf when he was stricken.
The company, following the oldest tradition in show business, will go ahead with the play's planned Feb. 5 opening, said Players spokeswoman Jane Margison.
"I can't tell you how much I loved the guy," Glenn Calloway said Monday. Calloway, who had directed Mr. D'Arc in the Fontana Mummers presentation of "The Crucible," saluted him as an able professional with a keen sense of whimsy. "I always told young actors, 'If you want to learn, listen to him.' "
Actor and director Chuck Abernathy recalled working with Mr. D'Arc in such shows as "Babes in Toyland," "Barnum," "Grand Hotel" and "Annie Get Your Gun."
"He was a very accomplished man," Abernathy said. "He was a talent that still had room to blossom."
That blossoming was evident for more than four decades with Mr. D'Arc working in all forms of the entertainment media and with a Who's Who of show business personalities. His son, Riverside puppeteer Rob D'Arc, recalls the family's home in New York City being visited frequently by such entertainers as Pat Cooper, Dom DeLuise and Shari Lewis, who had worked with him.
He began his career as a singer under his birth name, Dominic Manfredi, but changed it to D'Arc in his late teens when he began working at such venues as the Copacabana.
"There were two reasons for that," his son said. "First, there were Italian singers everywhere, so he knew he would be no novelty. And then he figured that if you had a French name you'd get girls. So, he became John D'Arc. It was sort of a play on the name Joan of Arc.
John D'Arc made his radio debut as a youngster in the early 1940s. He later performed at "Borscht Belt" resorts in New York State's Catskill Mountains and moved on to television with such programs as "The Milton Berle Show" and "The All Star Revue." Other personalities he worked with included Don Knotts, Jimmy Durante, Ed Wynn, Joey Bishop, Mike Douglas, Danny Thomas and Johnny Mathis.
Mr. D'Arc joined the Four Lads vocal group in the early '60s and sang with the quartet for 20 years. During the '70s he also toured with the Four Freshmen and the Ink Spots, frequently delighting friends with stories and impressions of the different singers he met.
He and his family moved to Chicago before coming to California in 1979, settling for a while in Anaheim and moving to the Riverside area in 1983. In recent years, Mr. D'Arc and his wife, Pamela, lived in Yucaipa.
He had been a busy figure on Southern California stages with parts that ranged from the tormented John Proctor in Arthur Miller's "The Crucible" to the tiger Sher Khan in "The Jungle Book."
Other roles included Major General Stanley in "The Pirates of Penzance," John Adams in "1776," Sennex in "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," Sitting Bull in "Annie Get Your Gun" and the bombastic Dindon in "La Cage aux Folles," a role he insisted he won during a poker game with director Gary Schultz.
He also performed at the Cinegrill in Hollywood, had appeared at various Los Angeles clubs in a revue directed by Ted Lange, recently completed work on the movie "Coyote" and had been discussing a role in "The Time of Your Life," a new TV series being prepared by the producers of Fox's "Party of Five."
"When I was little, he was on the road a lot," Rob D'Arc recalled. "But during the summer he would take us on tours of places like Japan, Bermuda and Puerto Rico. There were always people around and colored lights, and you really couldn't compare that with anything."
The D'Arcs frequently worked together on stage, and the elder D'Arc often stepped in for voice-overs and backstage work during the time his son operated the Kidstuff Puppet Theater on Mission Inn Avenue.
"We had such a connection that we could talk in shorthand," Rob D'Arc said. "And I know that when my time comes to go he will be the first person I meet and he will tell me what we will be doing - and I'm sure he will tell me he will have comps for anything we want to see."
In addition to his son and wife, Mr. D'Arc's survivors include a daughter, Stacy D'Arc of New York City.
Funeral and memorial service plans are incomplete.
Bio contributed by K(#46537737)

[Please note that the YVGS was notified by "sdarc" that the correct date of death is January 3rd 1999. This bio states that John had a daughter, Stacy.]


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  • Created by: Yucaipa Valley Genealogical Society
  • Added: 28 Apr 2010
  • Find a Grave Memorial 51743531
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for John E. D'Arc (21 Nov 1938–3 Jan 1999), Find a Grave Memorial no. 51743531, citing Desert Lawn Memorial Park, Calimesa, Riverside County, California, USA ; Maintained by Yucaipa Valley Genealogical Society (contributor 47266728) .