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 Roy Gifford Halstead

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Roy Gifford Halstead

Birth
Blair, Washington County, Nebraska, USA
Death
13 May 1922 (aged 28)
Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, USA
Burial
Blair, Washington County, Nebraska, USA
Plot
Block 84, Lot 4, Space 5
Memorial ID
50495993 View Source

Roy was the fourth child born to Clement and Sarah Halstead.

According to the US Marine Corps Muster Roll of July 1918, Roy served in the 43rd CO, sustained a gunshot wound above his left eye, into his frontal sinus and left orbit. He was transferred from France back to USA on Nov. 14, 1918.
He died from complications due to his head wound.

The Pilot, Blair, Nebraska May 17, 1922
Roy Halstead Given Military Funeral Today
Roy Halstead was taken to the Wise Memorial Hospital in Omaha last week, died Sunday as a result of the terrible wounds received while in the service of his country. The remains were laid away with military honors in the Blair Cemetery today, Stanley E. Hain Post of the American Legion in charge of the funeral services at the B. F. Opera House. Elder T. J. Elliott Of Omaha, president of the southeast Reorganized Church of the Latter Day Saints preached the funeral sermon, being assisted in the service by Rev. LeRoy Crocker of the Christian church. The sermon was a masterly effort and proves the speaker to be a man of Exceptional ability. Six ex-servicemen served as pallbearers, Carl Schmidt, R. H. Robinson, Ruthven Anderson, William Beck,
Jean Paul Gipp and Herbert Henningson. A firing squad fired a salute at the grave and taps was sounded by Earl Fleege.
A good delegation of ex-servicemen appeared in uniform and a few members of the G. A. R. were in line also. The Woman's Auxiliary attended in a body and wives of Spanish American War Veterans were invited to attend with them.
There were many floral offerings and the hall was flatteringly decorated with flag. The Blair band played a funeral march as they marched out of the city toward the city of the dead and again at the cemetery.
Roy gifford Halstead was born at Blair, Nebraska July 11, 1893 and therefore passed 28 years of age at the time of his death. He leaves to mourn, his early death, his parents, Mr. And Mrs. Clem Halstead, of this city;two sisters, Mrs. J. Good of Omaha and Mrs. Ed Kirk of Blair, Also four brothers. Of those, Everett and Jess are ex-servicemen, having served through the late World war and both have now received an honorable discharge and are at home. Floyd and Clifford, the two remaining brothers, live at home with the parents. A large number of other relatives and friends mourn with the sorrowing parents and family.
At the beginning of the World War Roy was at great Falls, Montana and n hearing of the enlistment of his brothers and friends at Blair he hasten to Great Falls and answered the call to the colors. He was immediately sent to Mare Island, California on August 3rd, 1917 and was soon on his way to the scene of battle with the 1st Battery, U. S. Marines serving with the marines the fall of 1917 and the spring of 1918 in Verdun section.
He was with the gallant company of the marines, the 34th which made Belleau Woods a place of history. In June he was in the battle of the Chatea- Thierry where on June 13th, 1918 his whole company of marines, a picked patrol of expert marksmen, were almost wiped out of existence by a flock of Zeppelins and other aircraft with bombs and machine gun bullets.
A body supposed to be that of Roy Halstead was picked up with Roy's identification tag near by and was buried in the field of battle. The government sent a telegram to the Washington County Chapter of the American Red Cross to the parents that their son had fallen in battle.
Months went by and one day in the fall the Paris field secretary of the Red Cross found a badly wounded boy in the base hospital, that had been transferred from several hospitals, who claimed to be Roy Halstead of the marines. He then notified the mother at Blair and Clark O'Hanlon, located a County Red Cross chairman, instructed the secretary to cable and write us and use every means within the power of the Red Cross to identify the boy and to request his transfer.
Mr. J. P. Jensen, then county secretary of the Red Cross, now post war service secretary of the American Legion Post 154, succeed in establishing the boy's identity and asked for a furlough home. Since the government and army still contended Roy was dead the Red Cross officers of Blair brought him home to Blair and some months later after they had filed his claim to the government at last the commander of the marines issued Roy an honorable discharge.
He came home to rest from his honorable service to his country, having been wounded very badly in the head, having lost one eye and sustained life long injuries from which he never recovered. He was brave and cheerful, always thoughtful of his mother and never complained of his suffering.
On Wednesday, May 10th, the officers of Stanley E. Hain Post of the American Legion arranged for his emergency hospital care, as he was suffering greatly from a pain in the head. Everything possible was done for his welfare but he passed away Sunday as above stated. Thus

Roy was the fourth child born to Clement and Sarah Halstead.

According to the US Marine Corps Muster Roll of July 1918, Roy served in the 43rd CO, sustained a gunshot wound above his left eye, into his frontal sinus and left orbit. He was transferred from France back to USA on Nov. 14, 1918.
He died from complications due to his head wound.

The Pilot, Blair, Nebraska May 17, 1922
Roy Halstead Given Military Funeral Today
Roy Halstead was taken to the Wise Memorial Hospital in Omaha last week, died Sunday as a result of the terrible wounds received while in the service of his country. The remains were laid away with military honors in the Blair Cemetery today, Stanley E. Hain Post of the American Legion in charge of the funeral services at the B. F. Opera House. Elder T. J. Elliott Of Omaha, president of the southeast Reorganized Church of the Latter Day Saints preached the funeral sermon, being assisted in the service by Rev. LeRoy Crocker of the Christian church. The sermon was a masterly effort and proves the speaker to be a man of Exceptional ability. Six ex-servicemen served as pallbearers, Carl Schmidt, R. H. Robinson, Ruthven Anderson, William Beck,
Jean Paul Gipp and Herbert Henningson. A firing squad fired a salute at the grave and taps was sounded by Earl Fleege.
A good delegation of ex-servicemen appeared in uniform and a few members of the G. A. R. were in line also. The Woman's Auxiliary attended in a body and wives of Spanish American War Veterans were invited to attend with them.
There were many floral offerings and the hall was flatteringly decorated with flag. The Blair band played a funeral march as they marched out of the city toward the city of the dead and again at the cemetery.
Roy gifford Halstead was born at Blair, Nebraska July 11, 1893 and therefore passed 28 years of age at the time of his death. He leaves to mourn, his early death, his parents, Mr. And Mrs. Clem Halstead, of this city;two sisters, Mrs. J. Good of Omaha and Mrs. Ed Kirk of Blair, Also four brothers. Of those, Everett and Jess are ex-servicemen, having served through the late World war and both have now received an honorable discharge and are at home. Floyd and Clifford, the two remaining brothers, live at home with the parents. A large number of other relatives and friends mourn with the sorrowing parents and family.
At the beginning of the World War Roy was at great Falls, Montana and n hearing of the enlistment of his brothers and friends at Blair he hasten to Great Falls and answered the call to the colors. He was immediately sent to Mare Island, California on August 3rd, 1917 and was soon on his way to the scene of battle with the 1st Battery, U. S. Marines serving with the marines the fall of 1917 and the spring of 1918 in Verdun section.
He was with the gallant company of the marines, the 34th which made Belleau Woods a place of history. In June he was in the battle of the Chatea- Thierry where on June 13th, 1918 his whole company of marines, a picked patrol of expert marksmen, were almost wiped out of existence by a flock of Zeppelins and other aircraft with bombs and machine gun bullets.
A body supposed to be that of Roy Halstead was picked up with Roy's identification tag near by and was buried in the field of battle. The government sent a telegram to the Washington County Chapter of the American Red Cross to the parents that their son had fallen in battle.
Months went by and one day in the fall the Paris field secretary of the Red Cross found a badly wounded boy in the base hospital, that had been transferred from several hospitals, who claimed to be Roy Halstead of the marines. He then notified the mother at Blair and Clark O'Hanlon, located a County Red Cross chairman, instructed the secretary to cable and write us and use every means within the power of the Red Cross to identify the boy and to request his transfer.
Mr. J. P. Jensen, then county secretary of the Red Cross, now post war service secretary of the American Legion Post 154, succeed in establishing the boy's identity and asked for a furlough home. Since the government and army still contended Roy was dead the Red Cross officers of Blair brought him home to Blair and some months later after they had filed his claim to the government at last the commander of the marines issued Roy an honorable discharge.
He came home to rest from his honorable service to his country, having been wounded very badly in the head, having lost one eye and sustained life long injuries from which he never recovered. He was brave and cheerful, always thoughtful of his mother and never complained of his suffering.
On Wednesday, May 10th, the officers of Stanley E. Hain Post of the American Legion arranged for his emergency hospital care, as he was suffering greatly from a pain in the head. Everything possible was done for his welfare but he passed away Sunday as above stated. Thus


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