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VADM Henry Claiborne Crommelin

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VADM Henry Claiborne Crommelin

Birth
Montgomery, Montgomery County, Alabama, USA
Death
2 Mar 1971 (aged 66)
Wetumpka, Elmore County, Alabama, USA
Burial
Arlington, Arlington County, Virginia, USA
Plot
Sec: 5, Site: 45
Memorial ID
49172617 View Source

From the Encyclopedia of Alabama
Alabama's five Crommelin brothers—John, Henry, Richard, Charles, and Quentin— served in some of World War II's most famous battles in the Pacific. All graduated from the United States Naval Academy (USNA), and for their collective heroic efforts during the war, Time Magazine dubbed the brothers the "Indestructibles" in January 1944. However, Richard and Charles would die later during the conflict.

The brothers were born to John Geraerdt and Katherine Vasser Crommelin and had three sisters, Elizabeth, Katherine, and Lucie. The Crommelin family traces its roots in Alabama to the 1820s through a line of successful planters. During the brothers' childhood years, the family maintained a home in Montgomery and a plantation, Harrogate Springs, that fronted the Coosa River near Wetumpka, Elmore County, next to present-day Fort Toulouse National Historic Park.

Henry Crommelin
Henry Claiborne Crommelin (b. August 11, 1904) graduated from the Naval Academy in 1925. He chose a career in surface warfare because his poor eyesight prevented him from flying. Early in his career, he served on several battleships. During World War II, he commanded destroyers and participated in the North African Invasion in November 1942. Transferred to the Pacific, he was awarded the Silver Star for his command of Destroyer Squadron 50 in November 1943 when he closed his ships in on the islet of Betio, part of the Tarawa Atoll, where they shelled enemy shore batteries while under fire. He later was awarded the Bronze Star with Combat ‘V' for valor as commander of a destroyer group during the amphibious assault to recapture the key Pacific island of Guam in July 1944. After the war, he served as Chief of Staff to Rear Admiral William K. Phillips, Commander Destroyers, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, and he later rose to command the U.S. Atlantic Fleet. He was promoted to vice-admiral, the highest rank achieved by any of the brothers. Before retiring from the Navy in 1959, he commanded a battleship division and the naval base at Newport, Rhode Island. He died of cancer March 2, 1971, at his Elmore County home and is interred in Arlington National Cemetery. He was married to Sally Huntress Crommelin, with whom he had four children.

From the Encyclopedia of Alabama
Alabama's five Crommelin brothers—John, Henry, Richard, Charles, and Quentin— served in some of World War II's most famous battles in the Pacific. All graduated from the United States Naval Academy (USNA), and for their collective heroic efforts during the war, Time Magazine dubbed the brothers the "Indestructibles" in January 1944. However, Richard and Charles would die later during the conflict.

The brothers were born to John Geraerdt and Katherine Vasser Crommelin and had three sisters, Elizabeth, Katherine, and Lucie. The Crommelin family traces its roots in Alabama to the 1820s through a line of successful planters. During the brothers' childhood years, the family maintained a home in Montgomery and a plantation, Harrogate Springs, that fronted the Coosa River near Wetumpka, Elmore County, next to present-day Fort Toulouse National Historic Park.

Henry Crommelin
Henry Claiborne Crommelin (b. August 11, 1904) graduated from the Naval Academy in 1925. He chose a career in surface warfare because his poor eyesight prevented him from flying. Early in his career, he served on several battleships. During World War II, he commanded destroyers and participated in the North African Invasion in November 1942. Transferred to the Pacific, he was awarded the Silver Star for his command of Destroyer Squadron 50 in November 1943 when he closed his ships in on the islet of Betio, part of the Tarawa Atoll, where they shelled enemy shore batteries while under fire. He later was awarded the Bronze Star with Combat ‘V' for valor as commander of a destroyer group during the amphibious assault to recapture the key Pacific island of Guam in July 1944. After the war, he served as Chief of Staff to Rear Admiral William K. Phillips, Commander Destroyers, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, and he later rose to command the U.S. Atlantic Fleet. He was promoted to vice-admiral, the highest rank achieved by any of the brothers. Before retiring from the Navy in 1959, he commanded a battleship division and the naval base at Newport, Rhode Island. He died of cancer March 2, 1971, at his Elmore County home and is interred in Arlington National Cemetery. He was married to Sally Huntress Crommelin, with whom he had four children.

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