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 Richard A. Floyd

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Richard A. Floyd

Birth
Pickens County, Alabama, USA
Death
7 Jun 1865 (aged 25–26)
Virginia, USA
Burial
Hampton, Hampton City, Virginia, USA
Plot
D, 2192
Memorial ID
48521958 View Source

He was my gg-grandfather.

Parents: John Floyd and Margaret Richardson Mayo Floyd. He was the grandson of Reuben Floyd who was born abt 1768 Virginia and died 1824 in Chester County, South Carolina; Reuben's Will was probated in Chester County on Nov. 21, 1825 (MSS WILL: ESTATE RECORD BOOK H, PAGE 101; ESTATE PACKET: APT 44, PKG 703, South Carolina Dept of Archives and History).

Through his mother, Richard A. Floyd was the ggg-grandson of Valentine Mayo, born abt 1665 Virginia, died Oct 5, 1716. Valentine Mayo's funeral was held on Oct 7, 1716 at historic Christ Church in Middlesex County, Virginia. Valentine Mayo married twice-widowed Anne Mickleburrough in the church on Nov. 14, 1710 and their children James b. 1711, Elizabeth Anne b. 1713, and Sarah b. 1715, were baptized in Christ Church. [Source: Parish Register of Christ Church, Middlesex County, Virginia, 1653-1812]

Spouse: Susan Jane Harris (1843-1908)

Children: John Franklin Floyd (1859-1934) and Mary E. "Mollie" Floyd (1862-1941)

Richard A. Floyd was born in Pickens County, Alabama about 1839. Richard's gr-uncle Newton Harbin and wife Mary Locke Noland arrived in Pickens County, Alabama before 1816 from Chester County, South Carolina, and later settled in Carroll County, Mississippi where Newton Harbin died in 1864. Newton Harbin was the brother of Lucy Harbin who married John Mayo and they were parents of Margaret Richardson Mayo Floyd, mother of Richard A. Floyd.

John and Margaret Mayo Floyd left Chester County, South Carolina and settled in Pickens County, Alabama near Margaret's uncle Newton Harbin. John and Margaret had 4 children born in Alabama: Lucinda abt 1837, Richard A abt 1839, Anderson F abt 1842, Hiram HC abt 1844. John and Margaret Mayo Floyd then moved the family to Tishomingo County, Mississippi before 1845. They settled in the Boggs Chapel community where John engaged in farming and possibly timber production, as he owned various tracts of land.

On July 13, 1857 Richard A. Floyd and Susan Jane Harris were married in Tishomingo County. They settled in the Cartersville community [between present-day Midway and South Crossroads] in Tishomingo County. Their two children, John Franklin "Frank" Floyd and Mary Emmaline "Mollie" Floyd were born there.

According to Richard Floyd's military papers, he signed up for a period of three years with the 26th Regiment, Company A, Mississippi Volunteers, CSA, on August 19, 1861 at Iuka, Mississippi. He gave his occupation as a farmer according to his muster roll. He enlisted with his brothers Hiram H.C. Floyd and David Vant Floyd, their uncle William James David Mayo (brother of Margaret Richardson Mayo Floyd), and cousins Anderson Thompson Mayo and James G. Mayo.

On Feb. 16, 1862 Richard A. Floyd was taken prisoner at Fort Donelson in Tennessee. He spent about nine months as a pow at Camp Morton in Indianapolis, Indiana. He was released in a POW exchange on November 10, 1862. The 26th met and regrouped at Jackson, Mississippi. Richard also took part in battles at: [Mississippi] Coffeville, Willow Springs, Bakers Creek and Jackson [Virginia - under command of General Robert E. Lee] Wilderness, Talleys Mills, Spotsylvania Courthouse, Hanover Junction, Cold Harbor, Gaines Mill, Petersburg, Weldon R. R., Fort McCray, Hatchers Run and Jarretts Station.

In the spring of 1865 the 26th fought again at Hatchers Run. On March 1st Richard was wounded in battle there -- shot in the back/right hip -- and most of the 26th was taken prisoner. On April 1, 1865 he was placed in a field hospital and on April 2nd he was admitted to Point of Rocks Hospital after receiving no medical attention from March 1st to April 2nd. On April 12th he was transferred to a U.S.A. steamer and on the 13th placed in General Hospital at Fort Monroe, Virginia. On June 7, 1865 Richard, 25 years old, died from his wounds and exhaustion. He is buried in Hampton National Cemetery in Hampton, Virginia, Section D, Grave No. 2192. Primarily for Union soldiers, 272 Confederate soldiers are interred in their own section. Hampton National Cemetery was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on February 26, 1996.

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He was my gg-grandfather.

Parents: John Floyd and Margaret Richardson Mayo Floyd. He was the grandson of Reuben Floyd who was born abt 1768 Virginia and died 1824 in Chester County, South Carolina; Reuben's Will was probated in Chester County on Nov. 21, 1825 (MSS WILL: ESTATE RECORD BOOK H, PAGE 101; ESTATE PACKET: APT 44, PKG 703, South Carolina Dept of Archives and History).

Through his mother, Richard A. Floyd was the ggg-grandson of Valentine Mayo, born abt 1665 Virginia, died Oct 5, 1716. Valentine Mayo's funeral was held on Oct 7, 1716 at historic Christ Church in Middlesex County, Virginia. Valentine Mayo married twice-widowed Anne Mickleburrough in the church on Nov. 14, 1710 and their children James b. 1711, Elizabeth Anne b. 1713, and Sarah b. 1715, were baptized in Christ Church. [Source: Parish Register of Christ Church, Middlesex County, Virginia, 1653-1812]

Spouse: Susan Jane Harris (1843-1908)

Children: John Franklin Floyd (1859-1934) and Mary E. "Mollie" Floyd (1862-1941)

Richard A. Floyd was born in Pickens County, Alabama about 1839. Richard's gr-uncle Newton Harbin and wife Mary Locke Noland arrived in Pickens County, Alabama before 1816 from Chester County, South Carolina, and later settled in Carroll County, Mississippi where Newton Harbin died in 1864. Newton Harbin was the brother of Lucy Harbin who married John Mayo and they were parents of Margaret Richardson Mayo Floyd, mother of Richard A. Floyd.

John and Margaret Mayo Floyd left Chester County, South Carolina and settled in Pickens County, Alabama near Margaret's uncle Newton Harbin. John and Margaret had 4 children born in Alabama: Lucinda abt 1837, Richard A abt 1839, Anderson F abt 1842, Hiram HC abt 1844. John and Margaret Mayo Floyd then moved the family to Tishomingo County, Mississippi before 1845. They settled in the Boggs Chapel community where John engaged in farming and possibly timber production, as he owned various tracts of land.

On July 13, 1857 Richard A. Floyd and Susan Jane Harris were married in Tishomingo County. They settled in the Cartersville community [between present-day Midway and South Crossroads] in Tishomingo County. Their two children, John Franklin "Frank" Floyd and Mary Emmaline "Mollie" Floyd were born there.

According to Richard Floyd's military papers, he signed up for a period of three years with the 26th Regiment, Company A, Mississippi Volunteers, CSA, on August 19, 1861 at Iuka, Mississippi. He gave his occupation as a farmer according to his muster roll. He enlisted with his brothers Hiram H.C. Floyd and David Vant Floyd, their uncle William James David Mayo (brother of Margaret Richardson Mayo Floyd), and cousins Anderson Thompson Mayo and James G. Mayo.

On Feb. 16, 1862 Richard A. Floyd was taken prisoner at Fort Donelson in Tennessee. He spent about nine months as a pow at Camp Morton in Indianapolis, Indiana. He was released in a POW exchange on November 10, 1862. The 26th met and regrouped at Jackson, Mississippi. Richard also took part in battles at: [Mississippi] Coffeville, Willow Springs, Bakers Creek and Jackson [Virginia - under command of General Robert E. Lee] Wilderness, Talleys Mills, Spotsylvania Courthouse, Hanover Junction, Cold Harbor, Gaines Mill, Petersburg, Weldon R. R., Fort McCray, Hatchers Run and Jarretts Station.

In the spring of 1865 the 26th fought again at Hatchers Run. On March 1st Richard was wounded in battle there -- shot in the back/right hip -- and most of the 26th was taken prisoner. On April 1, 1865 he was placed in a field hospital and on April 2nd he was admitted to Point of Rocks Hospital after receiving no medical attention from March 1st to April 2nd. On April 12th he was transferred to a U.S.A. steamer and on the 13th placed in General Hospital at Fort Monroe, Virginia. On June 7, 1865 Richard, 25 years old, died from his wounds and exhaustion. He is buried in Hampton National Cemetery in Hampton, Virginia, Section D, Grave No. 2192. Primarily for Union soldiers, 272 Confederate soldiers are interred in their own section. Hampton National Cemetery was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on February 26, 1996.

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