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Dr Don Lorenzo Byam

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Dr Don Lorenzo Byam

Birth
Death
1882 (aged 67–68)
Burial
Park County, Montana, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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DR. DON L. BYAM- Born in Auburn, New York 1814 son of Oliver Hale Byam and Polly Steele, he had four brother and one sister. Received his early education in New York. He attended William and Mary College in Virginia but did not graduate. He later graduated from one of the eclectic medical schools, then numerous in the country at that time. He began practice in Ohio and continued in the East for many years. He married Frances A. Slider of Dayton , Ohio in March 25, 1840, and to them five children were born, two daughters and three sons. Margaret Jerusha, Charles S, Henry Clay, Oliver Oscar and Minerva (Minnie). Margaret married Theophilus Muffly (a Lawyer by profession and a Montana Pioneer). Charles went to the Klondile and was never again heard from. Oliver was killed in a coal mine accident in 1884, Henry Clay died in Billings, Montana and Minerva married Grant Condit. Dr. Byam moved with his family to Iowa in the 1840Õs and moved again to Colorado with the PikeÕs Peak gold rush; he arrived in Bannack March 1, 1863. He was more intent on mining than on Medicine and began working a claim. The claim was jumped by bandits, and he went to Nevada City in Alder Gulch. There he began mining was promptly elected judge of the minerÕs count. As a judge he attained great fame. He presided at the trial of George Ives, a notorious leader of the road agents, charged specifically with the brutal murder of a harmless and well liked Dutch man named Nicholas Tbalt. Behind the trial was the fiasco of the pardoned murderers of Dillingham, and the known record of Ives as a highwayman and killer. Byam was assisted as judge by one man, and there were twenty-four jurors. The principals occupied wagon boxes placed on Main Street in Nevada City, a short distance west of Virginia City. The trial lasted three days in the latter part of December, 1863, and the jury found Ives guilty as charged. Judge Byam sentenced him to be hanged immediately and supervised preparation for execution. He watched the drop and quickly pronounced the man dead from a broken neck. The Vigilantes were organized soon after this spectacular trial and, although the list of members has never been published, it is probable that Dr. Byam was associated with this organization. Dr. Byam remained in the Madison County area as a Physician and miner until 1869. Then moved to Gallatin County and lived there for the remainder of his life. He was mentioned at Middle Creek, where he lived for a while as a rancher and Doctor. He had two ranches and prepared for farming on a large scale. Seed was shipped from Salt Lake City at great expense, but for two successive years grasshoppers destroyed the crops. Dr. Byam was financially ruined and moved to Bozeman about 1873, to resume the practice of medicine. His professional card appeared in the Bozeman Avant Courier from 1872 to August, 1876. While there he published an article in the Avant Courier setting forth his views as an eclectic physician. The physicians who followed the old established practices criticized this system as without diagnosis and with no specific method of treatment. Dr. Byam set forth his own philosophy. In 1875, he contributed to the Avant Courier an article on an epidemic of what he called Òcerebrospinal meningitis or spotted feverÓ which had been prevalent in the county. After describing the symptoms in detail, he wrote: ÒThe last case I treated (a child six months old) had spots on the limbs of purple color and some very dark.....We have had it,Ó continued the article, Òin the form of influenza, cynanche-malagna, catarral fever, relapsing fever, severe neuralgia, and last by the affection of the nerve centers.Ó This article probably did harm to the doctor. His eclectic practice had been under criticism for some time by orthodox physicians, and this broke out into the open and apparently injured his practice. The next year he left Bozeman and moved to Emigrant Gulch on the Yellowstone, where he again engaged in mining. About 1880 the family settled at the village of Riverside, across the river four miles from Emigrant. It was on the road between Bozeman and Emigrant, and the doctor operated a ferry, a store, and the post office, and practiced medicine. Near there he discovered the Trail Creek Coal Mine, and it seemed possible that he had unearthed the fortune he had sought so many years. He died soon after this discovery, on March 25, 1882. His widow went live with her daughter, Mrs. Theophilus Muffly, and twenty years later went to Illinois to live with her grandson Lorenzo Leslie Muffly, where she died in 1905 at the age of eighty-five. Dr. Byam died a poor man and an unsuccessful physician although he had a competent mind. He left a brilliant record in the war against crime and did a great work in making Montana a peaceful and law-abiding territory.
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Don Lorenzo Byam had two sisters, not one, which were, Juliett who married Luther Robbins and Janette who married Joseph Lewis Powers as evidenced by the marriage announcement of his brother, Philander Byam's daughter Sarah Cordelia Byam's marriage announcement to Alonzo Oliver Barnes where it said, "Mrs Dr. Powers, of Reinbeck , IA and Mrs Robbins, of Wisconsin, sisters of Dr. Byam, were among the guests."
DR. DON L. BYAM- Born in Auburn, New York 1814 son of Oliver Hale Byam and Polly Steele, he had four brother and one sister. Received his early education in New York. He attended William and Mary College in Virginia but did not graduate. He later graduated from one of the eclectic medical schools, then numerous in the country at that time. He began practice in Ohio and continued in the East for many years. He married Frances A. Slider of Dayton , Ohio in March 25, 1840, and to them five children were born, two daughters and three sons. Margaret Jerusha, Charles S, Henry Clay, Oliver Oscar and Minerva (Minnie). Margaret married Theophilus Muffly (a Lawyer by profession and a Montana Pioneer). Charles went to the Klondile and was never again heard from. Oliver was killed in a coal mine accident in 1884, Henry Clay died in Billings, Montana and Minerva married Grant Condit. Dr. Byam moved with his family to Iowa in the 1840Õs and moved again to Colorado with the PikeÕs Peak gold rush; he arrived in Bannack March 1, 1863. He was more intent on mining than on Medicine and began working a claim. The claim was jumped by bandits, and he went to Nevada City in Alder Gulch. There he began mining was promptly elected judge of the minerÕs count. As a judge he attained great fame. He presided at the trial of George Ives, a notorious leader of the road agents, charged specifically with the brutal murder of a harmless and well liked Dutch man named Nicholas Tbalt. Behind the trial was the fiasco of the pardoned murderers of Dillingham, and the known record of Ives as a highwayman and killer. Byam was assisted as judge by one man, and there were twenty-four jurors. The principals occupied wagon boxes placed on Main Street in Nevada City, a short distance west of Virginia City. The trial lasted three days in the latter part of December, 1863, and the jury found Ives guilty as charged. Judge Byam sentenced him to be hanged immediately and supervised preparation for execution. He watched the drop and quickly pronounced the man dead from a broken neck. The Vigilantes were organized soon after this spectacular trial and, although the list of members has never been published, it is probable that Dr. Byam was associated with this organization. Dr. Byam remained in the Madison County area as a Physician and miner until 1869. Then moved to Gallatin County and lived there for the remainder of his life. He was mentioned at Middle Creek, where he lived for a while as a rancher and Doctor. He had two ranches and prepared for farming on a large scale. Seed was shipped from Salt Lake City at great expense, but for two successive years grasshoppers destroyed the crops. Dr. Byam was financially ruined and moved to Bozeman about 1873, to resume the practice of medicine. His professional card appeared in the Bozeman Avant Courier from 1872 to August, 1876. While there he published an article in the Avant Courier setting forth his views as an eclectic physician. The physicians who followed the old established practices criticized this system as without diagnosis and with no specific method of treatment. Dr. Byam set forth his own philosophy. In 1875, he contributed to the Avant Courier an article on an epidemic of what he called Òcerebrospinal meningitis or spotted feverÓ which had been prevalent in the county. After describing the symptoms in detail, he wrote: ÒThe last case I treated (a child six months old) had spots on the limbs of purple color and some very dark.....We have had it,Ó continued the article, Òin the form of influenza, cynanche-malagna, catarral fever, relapsing fever, severe neuralgia, and last by the affection of the nerve centers.Ó This article probably did harm to the doctor. His eclectic practice had been under criticism for some time by orthodox physicians, and this broke out into the open and apparently injured his practice. The next year he left Bozeman and moved to Emigrant Gulch on the Yellowstone, where he again engaged in mining. About 1880 the family settled at the village of Riverside, across the river four miles from Emigrant. It was on the road between Bozeman and Emigrant, and the doctor operated a ferry, a store, and the post office, and practiced medicine. Near there he discovered the Trail Creek Coal Mine, and it seemed possible that he had unearthed the fortune he had sought so many years. He died soon after this discovery, on March 25, 1882. His widow went live with her daughter, Mrs. Theophilus Muffly, and twenty years later went to Illinois to live with her grandson Lorenzo Leslie Muffly, where she died in 1905 at the age of eighty-five. Dr. Byam died a poor man and an unsuccessful physician although he had a competent mind. He left a brilliant record in the war against crime and did a great work in making Montana a peaceful and law-abiding territory.
----------------------------
Don Lorenzo Byam had two sisters, not one, which were, Juliett who married Luther Robbins and Janette who married Joseph Lewis Powers as evidenced by the marriage announcement of his brother, Philander Byam's daughter Sarah Cordelia Byam's marriage announcement to Alonzo Oliver Barnes where it said, "Mrs Dr. Powers, of Reinbeck , IA and Mrs Robbins, of Wisconsin, sisters of Dr. Byam, were among the guests."

Inscription

DR. DON L. BYAM
1814 - 1882
PHYSICIAN-MINER-COURAGEOUS LEADER JUDGE OF MINERS COURT, NEVADA CITY, ALDER GULCH, DEC. 19-21, 1863 WHICH CONVICTED AND EXECUTED GEORGE IVES, ROAD AGENT; THIS LED TO THE VIGILANTE MOVEMENT THAT EXTERMINATED THE PLUMMER ROAD AGENT BAND AND BROUGHT LAW AND ORDER TO MONTANA’S EARLY YEARS



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