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 Hudson McDonald Shrode

Hudson McDonald Shrode

Birth
Warrick County, Indiana, USA
Death 2 Aug 1849 (aged 32)
Warrick County, Indiana, USA
Burial Boonville, Warrick County, Indiana, USA
Memorial ID 47497694 · View Source
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SOURCE: Find A Grave contributor - Bob Schmidt from an article his wife wrote for the publication "The Hoosier Packet," the news and journal of the Canal Society of Indiana.

Hudson McDonald Shrode was born on a farm in Boone Township, Warrick County, Indiana on April 5, 1817 to Francis and Rebecca Marrit (Hudson) Shrode. Francis Shrode had been born in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania on November 25, 1789, moved to Kentucky and then to Indiana Territory in 1814. He was described as a very tall, rawboned, stooped shouldered, Irishman who loved to tell stories about how he dealt with the Indians when coming to Indiana. He was elected and served for several years as judge in the old log Warrick county courthouse located in Boonville. He died in Boonville on November 23, 1872 at the age of 83.
Rebecca Marrit, Hudson's mother, had been born in North Carolina on October 6, 1797 and married Francis Shrode on December 5, 1816, six days before Indiana became a state. Hudson (Hut) was the oldest of their 14 children who were all born in Warrick County.
In 1836 the original 20 miles of the southern division of the Central Canal from Evansville to the Pigeon Creek Dam in Warrick County, Indiana was being constructed. Hudson, age 19, began working on the canal and became a contractor on what would later become part of the Wabash & Erie Canal. Although he hired all the local people available to construct the canal, he didn't have enough workers and had to import several hundred Irishmen. They dug the canal by hand or used horse drawn slip scoops. The dirt was then put into narrow-rimmed wheelbarrows and transported to a site to build either the canal's berm or towpath banks or the dam across the creek. After Hudson died many of these wheelbarrows, which he had kept, were sold at a public sale.
Not long after beginning work on the canal Hudson married Susan Coats on March 18, 1837. Susan, who was born in Salisbury, North Carolina, had lost her parents when she was very small. She migrated by a wagon pulled by oxen to the southern part of Indiana with her brother-in-law and two sisters when she was a young woman. On their way they stopped in Kentucky and raised a crop of tobacco before coming to southwestern Indiana.
Hudson and Susan had four children, Sarah Margaret, John Henry, Rebecca Ann and Jacob Allen. Their playmates were Indian children.
Hudson was on the list of Warrick County, Indiana pioneers. He understood his Indian neighbors and lived peacefully with them. He also got along well with others of his own race. He was a Methodist and a Republican.
Hudson accumulated enough money while working on the canal to purchase land. On August 1, 1839 he bought the North West quarter of the North East quarter of Section Six, in Township Five South, of Range Eight West, in the District of lands subject to sale at Vincennes, Indiana, containing thirty-nine acres. (Certificate No. 20161)
This land was located near his birthplace. On it he built a large, two room, log cabin about a quarter of a mile from the road. The Shrodes were known for building the best homes of the day and this one was no exception. The two spacious rooms were side by side with a huge brick chimney between them. The spaces between the large, square-cut logs were chinked with mud. Each room had a large fireplace connected to the chimney and had a polished stone hearth. Hearth stones came from a neighbor's quarry. A cellar was under the
kitchen and pantry room. In it they stored the apples, cabbage, and potatoes he raised on his farm as well as other provisions.
Near the cabin Hudson built a huge log barn. It housd all his livestock and the food he raised for his animals. He also planted a variety of fruit trees that provided enough fruit for his family.
Over the years the roads were changed to run along section lines and cut off the home from the road. The huge old oak trees were cut down and sold. Coal that was close to the surface under the farm was dug out by locals for their winter coal supplies. This left the ground with surface holes. Then the land was leased to a company for a hundred dollars an acre and was stripped it of what coal remained. Unsightly hills remain and the land will be worthless for a long time.
On October 1, 1840 Hudson purchased the North East quarter of the North West quarter of Section Six, in Township Five South, of Range Eight West, in the District of Lands subject to sale at Vincennes, Indiana, containing fifty acres and ninety-five hundredths of an acre. (Certificate No. 24342)
Following his construction work on the canal Hudson began farming his newly acquired land and became a successful farmer. But this alone did not satisfy him. He loved and hoarded money and wanted more. He started buying up poultry and eggs, putting them on a canal boat at Millersburgh, went down the canal to Evansville, transfered them to a raft, floated them down the Ohio River and the Mississippi River to New Orleans where he sold them for a big profit. He then returned to Evansville by a steamboat and made his way back to Warrick County by canal boat. At home on the hearth before his fireplace, he would count the gold coins he had emptied into pie pans. When every coin had been counted over and over he would place them in his cellar, which was his bank.
Hudson was a Justice of the Peace for many years. This was quite an honor for, at the time, the position of Justice of the Peace was about equivalent to the position of Judge today in prestige.
On February 1, 1849 Hudson purchased the South West quarter of North East quarter of Section Six in Township Five South, of Range Eight West, in the District of Lands subject to sale at Vincennes, Indiana, containing thirty-nine acres. (Certificate No. 33974) He made preparations to move to this farm on White River. He rented the old farm on which he lived.
Hudson made another trip to Orleans in 1849. It was to be his last. He contracted cholera and on his return trip got at far as Millersburgh, Indiana. He was so ill that he was taken off the canal boat to the home of Aunt Annie Cox where he died on August 2, 1849 at the young age of 32.
Susan, Hudson's wife, was left with four children to rear. She knew nothing about conducting business and hired her neighbor to see after the family's affairs. There was really nothing that needed to be done, but the neighbor paid himself royally. He took the newly purchased White River farm for his services leaving Susan with little to keep the family together.
Luckily Susan knew how to sew and became a tailor. She made men's clothing by hand for a very large county store called Jarretts, which was quite prosperous at that time. As soon as her daughter was old enough, Susan taught her how to sew and together they worked all day and well into the night either by light from the fire, from a rag twisted up in a saucer of grease, from a candle or, in later years, from a coal oil lamp. Susan's granddaughter, who eventually married a Jarrett, remarked on the quality of work she saw on her father's black satin wedding vest that Susan made. She said that Susan's stitches were more even than what a machine could have made.


Family Members

Spouse
Gravesite Details Shares stone with Susan.

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  • Created by: ladyN70
  • Added: 3 Feb 2010
  • Find A Grave Memorial 47497694
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Hudson McDonald Shrode (5 Apr 1817–2 Aug 1849), Find A Grave Memorial no. 47497694, citing Wesley Chapel Cemetery, Boonville, Warrick County, Indiana, USA ; Maintained by ladyN70 (contributor 46898081) .