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 Joseph Davis “JD” DeBlieux

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Joseph Davis “JD” DeBlieux

Birth
Columbia, Caldwell Parish, Louisiana, USA
Death
13 Mar 2005 (aged 92)
Mer Rouge, Morehouse Parish, Louisiana, USA
Burial
Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, USA
Plot
Garden of Crucifixion, Secton: #56, Lot: C, Space: #03
Memorial ID
47432178 View Source

Joseph "J.D." Davis DeBlieux was born on Thursday, September 12, 1912 in Columbia, Louisiana. He was the oldest child of Ozet Perot DeBlieux and Honore Louis DeBlieux, who preceded him in death. Mr. DeBlieux died at the Oak Woods Home for the Elderly in Mer Rouge, LA on Sunday, March 13, 2005 at the age of 92.

Mr. DeBlieux was a man from meager means, but dreamed big on bettering himself, his family and fellow man. He worked very intently to obtain his education and become a credit of his determination to help others.

J.D. graduated from Ouachita Parish High School and in 1932 was graduated from Northeast Junior College, his major being pre-law. He worked his way through L.S.U. Law School taking odd jobs such as running the elevator in the State Capital, plus many other low pay, honest endeavors to meet the requirements of financial needs to obtain his college education.

In 1938, J.D. graduated from Louisiana State University Law School and established a law practice in Baton Rouge, LA. He struggled through the depression years, never losing sight of his dedication to be of service to others.

In 1941, J.D. was drafted into the U.S. Army and served four years in the Mid-East as a Staff Sgt. Law Clerk. By 1946, he returned to the States and continued his law practice and entered into political life.

By 1956, J.D. was elected to the State Senate and gained notoriety for his outspoken beliefs of principles and morals. He was noted for defense of the working man and patriotism. He served in the State Senate four terms, sixteen years total, and sacrificed his political future defending "Civil Rights". He was named outstanding senator for one of the years while serving and was invited to the White House for a personal meeting with President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady, Lady Bird to commend him for his works.

J.D. DeBlieux's by-line was the Biblical quote, "What does it profit a man to gain the whole world and lose his soul?" He reminded people in conversation that he was busy trying to buy Eternal Insurance.

The late Governor John McKeithen said, "There has never been a man in the Legislature more honest than J.D. DeBlieux."

Mr. DeBlieux served as a leader and officer in many religious, civic and governmental organizations such as The Amvets, American Legion Commander, V.F.W., MADD, Lions Club, Kiwanis, American Bar Association, member of four prayer groups, Knights of Columbus Council # 969, 4th Degree Knights of St. Gregory (an honor bestowed by the Pope), Democratic Central Committee and other organizations. He received many honors for his dedication.

Mr. DeBlieux was a member of St. Joseph Catholic Cathedral, Baton Rouge, LA.

J.D. was preceded in death by his wife of forty-six years, Dorothy Lepine DeBlieux; his son, Paul Louis DeBlieux; a sister, Nita DeBlieux Brinson; two brothers, Henry Lester DeBlieux and Honore Louis DeBlieux, Jr.

J.D. was survived by four brothers: James DeBlieux, W.V. DeBlieux, John A. DeBlieux and Robert DeBlieux; six sisters: Mildred DeBlieux, Helen DeBlieux Hughes, all of Bastrop, LA, Lois DeBlieux Compton of Benton, AR, Tina DeBlieux Stephenson of Monroe, LA, Peggy DeBlieux Cayer of Ruston, LA and Alma DeBlieux Honeycutt of Mer Rouge, LA; numerous nieces, nephews and extended family.

Funeral services was under the direction of Rabenhorst at 825 Government St., Baton Rouge, LA. Visiting hours was on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 and the funeral mass celebrated at St. Joseph Catholic Cathedral on March 16, 2005 in Baton Rouge, LA officiated by Father John Kennedy and Monsignor Gerald Lefebvre. Interment followed in Resthaven Gardens of Memory.

Pallbearers were James B. Fredrick, Dave Kimball, Robert Parker, John Dale Powers, Ralf Brewer and Alex Bourgeous. Honorary Pallbearers were the Knights of Council # 969, Baton Rouge, LA.

In lieu of flowers the family kindly suggests memorials be made to St. Joseph Catholic Church, Bastrop, LA or the Knights of Columbus Council # 969, Baton Rouge, LA. The family extends thanks to all persons that supported J.D. in his lifetime and all who extended love and care in his "sun-set" of life, especially Oak Woods Home For the Elderly, of Mer Rouge, LA.

There was a memorial mass on Friday, March 18, 2005 at the St. Joseph Catholic in Bastrop, LA with Father John Kennedy officiating followed by visitation with family.
************************************************
Served as Louisiana State Senator from East Baton Rouge Parish 1956-1960 and again from 1964 to 1976.

Smiley Anders, the Baton Rouge Morning Advocate columnist, wrote on DeBlieux's death that the former lawmaker was "a small man with glasses and a high voice. But in the state Senate in the 1950s, his was the lone voice crying out for racial justice. Today, it's hard to imagine the kind of courage required to take a stand for civil rights in those days. Segregationists ran the state, and bad things could happen to people who supported ... voting rights for African Americans. J.D.'s support of civil rights didn't help his political career, and no doubt didn't help his law practice. Being ahead of your time can be a costly business. His stubborn advocacy of equal rights for all Louisiana people caused the first crack in the solid wall of segregation. J.D. said what he believed needed to be said, at a time when few people wanted to hear it. His stand was not only right—it was heroic."

Joseph "J.D." Davis DeBlieux was born on Thursday, September 12, 1912 in Columbia, Louisiana. He was the oldest child of Ozet Perot DeBlieux and Honore Louis DeBlieux, who preceded him in death. Mr. DeBlieux died at the Oak Woods Home for the Elderly in Mer Rouge, LA on Sunday, March 13, 2005 at the age of 92.

Mr. DeBlieux was a man from meager means, but dreamed big on bettering himself, his family and fellow man. He worked very intently to obtain his education and become a credit of his determination to help others.

J.D. graduated from Ouachita Parish High School and in 1932 was graduated from Northeast Junior College, his major being pre-law. He worked his way through L.S.U. Law School taking odd jobs such as running the elevator in the State Capital, plus many other low pay, honest endeavors to meet the requirements of financial needs to obtain his college education.

In 1938, J.D. graduated from Louisiana State University Law School and established a law practice in Baton Rouge, LA. He struggled through the depression years, never losing sight of his dedication to be of service to others.

In 1941, J.D. was drafted into the U.S. Army and served four years in the Mid-East as a Staff Sgt. Law Clerk. By 1946, he returned to the States and continued his law practice and entered into political life.

By 1956, J.D. was elected to the State Senate and gained notoriety for his outspoken beliefs of principles and morals. He was noted for defense of the working man and patriotism. He served in the State Senate four terms, sixteen years total, and sacrificed his political future defending "Civil Rights". He was named outstanding senator for one of the years while serving and was invited to the White House for a personal meeting with President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady, Lady Bird to commend him for his works.

J.D. DeBlieux's by-line was the Biblical quote, "What does it profit a man to gain the whole world and lose his soul?" He reminded people in conversation that he was busy trying to buy Eternal Insurance.

The late Governor John McKeithen said, "There has never been a man in the Legislature more honest than J.D. DeBlieux."

Mr. DeBlieux served as a leader and officer in many religious, civic and governmental organizations such as The Amvets, American Legion Commander, V.F.W., MADD, Lions Club, Kiwanis, American Bar Association, member of four prayer groups, Knights of Columbus Council # 969, 4th Degree Knights of St. Gregory (an honor bestowed by the Pope), Democratic Central Committee and other organizations. He received many honors for his dedication.

Mr. DeBlieux was a member of St. Joseph Catholic Cathedral, Baton Rouge, LA.

J.D. was preceded in death by his wife of forty-six years, Dorothy Lepine DeBlieux; his son, Paul Louis DeBlieux; a sister, Nita DeBlieux Brinson; two brothers, Henry Lester DeBlieux and Honore Louis DeBlieux, Jr.

J.D. was survived by four brothers: James DeBlieux, W.V. DeBlieux, John A. DeBlieux and Robert DeBlieux; six sisters: Mildred DeBlieux, Helen DeBlieux Hughes, all of Bastrop, LA, Lois DeBlieux Compton of Benton, AR, Tina DeBlieux Stephenson of Monroe, LA, Peggy DeBlieux Cayer of Ruston, LA and Alma DeBlieux Honeycutt of Mer Rouge, LA; numerous nieces, nephews and extended family.

Funeral services was under the direction of Rabenhorst at 825 Government St., Baton Rouge, LA. Visiting hours was on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 and the funeral mass celebrated at St. Joseph Catholic Cathedral on March 16, 2005 in Baton Rouge, LA officiated by Father John Kennedy and Monsignor Gerald Lefebvre. Interment followed in Resthaven Gardens of Memory.

Pallbearers were James B. Fredrick, Dave Kimball, Robert Parker, John Dale Powers, Ralf Brewer and Alex Bourgeous. Honorary Pallbearers were the Knights of Council # 969, Baton Rouge, LA.

In lieu of flowers the family kindly suggests memorials be made to St. Joseph Catholic Church, Bastrop, LA or the Knights of Columbus Council # 969, Baton Rouge, LA. The family extends thanks to all persons that supported J.D. in his lifetime and all who extended love and care in his "sun-set" of life, especially Oak Woods Home For the Elderly, of Mer Rouge, LA.

There was a memorial mass on Friday, March 18, 2005 at the St. Joseph Catholic in Bastrop, LA with Father John Kennedy officiating followed by visitation with family.
************************************************
Served as Louisiana State Senator from East Baton Rouge Parish 1956-1960 and again from 1964 to 1976.

Smiley Anders, the Baton Rouge Morning Advocate columnist, wrote on DeBlieux's death that the former lawmaker was "a small man with glasses and a high voice. But in the state Senate in the 1950s, his was the lone voice crying out for racial justice. Today, it's hard to imagine the kind of courage required to take a stand for civil rights in those days. Segregationists ran the state, and bad things could happen to people who supported ... voting rights for African Americans. J.D.'s support of civil rights didn't help his political career, and no doubt didn't help his law practice. Being ahead of your time can be a costly business. His stubborn advocacy of equal rights for all Louisiana people caused the first crack in the solid wall of segregation. J.D. said what he believed needed to be said, at a time when few people wanted to hear it. His stand was not only right—it was heroic."


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