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Philip Wallace Hiden Sr.

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Philip Wallace Hiden Sr.

Birth
Orange County, Virginia, USA
Death
25 Oct 1936 (aged 64)
Newport News City, Virginia, USA
Burial
Lynchburg, Lynchburg City, Virginia, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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J. L. Cowherd (49060989) sends the info: Philip Hiden served as the mayor of the independent city of Newport News from 1920 to 1924. He was the first mayor to serve under a new City Council-City Manager form of government, as opposed to being directly elected.
~~~~~~
The Daily Press (Newport News, Va.),
Mon, 26 Oct 1936, p1 & 8, c4 & 1

Philip W. Hiden, Business, Civic Leader, Succumbs
Local Shipping, Warehouse Operator Dies at 64, Following Five-Week Illness
Started In Produce Here In 1899
Identified With Many Movements to Benefit Citizens and Community

Philip Wallace Hiden, 64, who, over a period of 37 years, built one of the largest shipping and warehouse storage businesses on the Atlantic seaboard, died yesterday afternoon at 3:45 at Riverside hospital following an illness of five weeks.

He started his career as a telegraph operator for the Chesapeake & Ohio railway at Fredericks Hall at the age of 19. With the war came opportunities for a broader service which gained for him the confidence of railway officials in the handling of vast shipments of timber and horses.

Locating in Newport News shortly after the city became incorporated, he attained before many years a place as a citizen of the first order. He became mayor of the city when the new form of government was established and was among the leaders who sponsored change in administrative affairs at that time. He urges and was largely responsible for the purchase of the water works of the city and also for the reorganization of Riverside hospital.

Mr. Hiden was the son of Philip Barbour Hiden of Orange county and Betty Hawes Goodwin of Louisa county. He was born in Orange county, and when he was 15 the family moved to Fluvanna, where he attended school. Later he was a student at William and Mary college, but at 19 he cut short his college studies to accept a position as telegraph operator. Within several years he had held posts as agent at practically every station between Fredericks Hall and Old Point, and long after he had left the service he held by proxy the agency at Oyster Point, which he relinquished around 1924.

Mr. Hiden came to Newport News in 1899. He was a youth, still in his 20s. Forming a partnership with H. B. Walker, the two went into the wholesale produce business under the firm name of Hiden and Walker. The business thrived and later Mr. Hiden added wood and building timber to the firm's activities.

In 1904 the firm dissolved and Mr. Hiden retained the wood and timber business which became the basis of extensive operations during the years just prior to and during the world war.

Big Shipper of Timber.

He acquired large holdings of wood and timber in various parts of Virginia and engaged in the shipment of timber cargoes through the local port.

Meanwhile, he married Miss Martha Woodroof of Detmold, near Coleman's Falls, Bedford county, June 23, 1909.

Mr. Hiden's relations with the Chesapeake & Ohio railway had resulted in a mutual faith between himself and the railroad officials as a result of many transactions during the years following establishment here in 1899. Consequently, when the flood of 1913 visited the area around Cincinnati, the railroad asked Mr. Hiden to take charge of the shipment of vast quantities of timber from the east to take care of emergency construction work, especially of bridges and other necessary facilities that had been washed away.

A study of the forest regions of the east had given Mr. Hiden an excellent conception of where timber could be obtained. Despite the short notice, he boarded a freight train directed to several points in Maryland and after directing the loading of a number of trains he went to Cincinnati to direct the unloading and aid in other ways in the emergency.

A year later most of the nations of the Old World were engaged in an unprecedented conflict. Horses by the thousands were needed as quickly as they could be obtained and shipped abroad. Newport News became a port of embarkation for animals, and later for men. France, Belgium and Spain were clamoring for horses. The British remount commission was pressing the governments for shipments as rapidly as they could be obtained. Again the railroad here went to Mr. Hiden in another emergency, something new and different from floods, but with confidence that he would direct the work effectively, and explained the requirements of feeding and taking care of thousands of horses to be shipped through the port to the nations named.

During the period of the world war, he shipped 560,000 horses, and lost only 1 percent, according to records of H. Sidney SMith, Mr. Hiden's "right-hand man."

Soon after the close of the conflict, Mr. Hiden relinquished his interest in wood and timber shipments, although he devoted some time to disposing of forests and other kindred matters incident to the embarkation activities of the port.

Establishes New Business

Then came another era in his career as a leader of shipping activities here. In 1922 he acquired the warehouses near Morrison which had been used by the United States government as an aviation supply base. This brought about the establishment of the Hiden Storage and Forwarding company. The business developed into a vast tobacco storage project when a group of warehouses at Newport News which also had been owned by the government in its port of embarkation activities were acquired by Mr. Hiden and utilized for his storage business. The business continued to grow until it became necessary to procure additional storage facilities and this was provided through the erection of additional buildings.

Some years ago he moved into an unpretentious office on the second floor at 2617 Washington avenue. A plain sign outside attached to the second floor and well above the straight vision of pedestrians was the only display Mr. Hiden ever authorized to indicate a business that probably had no rival in growth and extent in the east.

As Civic Leader

While serving as mayor he became interested in the acquisition of the old water corporation by the city and finally succeeded in completing those negotiations. He was the first and only chairman of the water works commission, a position he held at the time of his death.

Mr. Hiden's interest in the community where his life's work had been crowned with marked success and achievement included several different fields of service. His knowledge of the port and its shipping facilities led to his appointment as a member of the Virginia State port commission and he was also actively identified with the local and State chambers of commerce.

About the time when Mr. Hiden became mayor of the city, he an W. B. Livezy and Homer L. Ferguson were requested to look into the affairs of the Riverside hospital with a view to reorganize the institution under some new financial agreement that would save it from being returned to the trustees. The three local leaders conferred over the problem and reached an agreement to appoint a board of governors in connection with a program which they thought would mean the operation of the hospital upon a more successful basis. It was agreed that each of the three conferees would name one member of the board. L. U. Noland was named by Mr. Hiden; R. L. Henderson by Mr. Ferguson; H. Sidney Smith by Mr. Livezey; and Judge John B. Locke and George T. Hardy were named at large. The subsequent years attested the judgement of the first efforts of the group in re-establishment of the hospital - and achievement which friends said Mr. Hiden was especially proud.

Mr. Hiden's keen interest in the community and its people was displayed on occasion about the same time the Colonial State bank failed here. Its affairs were taken over by two other local banking institutions and Mr. Hiden agreed to take the worthless paper, running into thousands of dollars. If the two banks would assume all other obligations and repay the depositors dollar for dollar.

Aided Bank Depositors

This gesture made possible the saving to a large number of persons here of money they had placed in the defunct bank.

Through the latter years of his life, Mr. Hiden continued a keen interest in the affairs of the city. Until he became ill, he was actively engaged in business. Recently he bought Washington square from the C. & O. railway and negotiated a deal with Montgomery Ward whereby that concern will soon occupy a four story building to be built by the Hiden heirs.

Surviving relatives include his wife, Mrs. P. W. Hiden; four daughters, Mrs. Delano McKelvey of Washington; Miss Suzanne Hiden of this city, Miss Frances Hiden of this city, Miss Georgia Hiden of New York; one son, P. W. Hiden Jr., student at Dartmouth college. Also there are three brothers and two sisters, Dr. Martin B. Hiden of Warrenton, W. C. Hiden of Baltimore, G. George Hiden of Richmond, Mrs. W. S. Hoge of Washington and Miss Nannie Hiden.

Funeral services will take place tomorrow morning at 9 at the residence, 5600 Huntington avenue. A brief service will be conducted here by the Rev. J. Keith M. Lee, rector of St. Paul's Episcopal church, and the cortege will then proceed to Spring Hill cemetery, near Lynchburg, where burial will take place.

Active pallbearers will be P. W. Murray, R. M. Lett, R. P. Holt, A. S. Johnson, H. S. Smith Sr., L. C. Spengler, H. T. Parker.

Honorary pallbearers will be Homer L. Ferguson, L. U. Noland, S. W. Holt, A. T. Lowmaster of Richmond, G. D. Brooke of Richmond, A. G. Harwwod Jr. of Lee Hall, Robert Button of Culpeper, Dr. C. B. Courtney, Dr. J. S. Beavers, S. H. Plummer, Judge John B. Locke, J. C. Biggins, W. T. Chapin, C. D. West, T. J. Hundley, W. B. Livezey, J. Scott Parrish of Richmond, W. A. Cox of Norfolk, W. H. Maher of Norfolk, E. P. Goodwin of Richmond, Garland Gray of Waverly, H. S. Barbee of Norfolk, Marshall King of Alexandria, H. A. Keitz, and Major Raymond B. Bottom; also friends of the family and officials of the C. & O. from Cincinnati and Richmond.
~~~~~~~~~~
The Gloucester Gazette (Virginia),
Thurs, 29 October 1936, p5, c4

Newport News - Philip W. Hiden, 64, who started as a telegraph operator for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway, died here Sunday afternoon after a five week's illness. At the time of his death he controlled the largest warehouse and shipping operations in this section, the achievement representing the result of a career of 37 years in waterfront and railroad activities here.

Funeral services took place at the home at 9 a.m. Tuesday with the Rev. J. Keith M. Lee, rector of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, officiating. Burial was in Spring Hill Cemetery in Lynchburg.

Mr. Hiden was born in Orange County, the son of Philip Barbour Hiden. His mother was Miss Betty Hawes Goodwin of Louisa County. He came to Newport News in 1899 after serving as a telegraph operator for the railroad several years and established a wholesale produce business.
J. L. Cowherd (49060989) sends the info: Philip Hiden served as the mayor of the independent city of Newport News from 1920 to 1924. He was the first mayor to serve under a new City Council-City Manager form of government, as opposed to being directly elected.
~~~~~~
The Daily Press (Newport News, Va.),
Mon, 26 Oct 1936, p1 & 8, c4 & 1

Philip W. Hiden, Business, Civic Leader, Succumbs
Local Shipping, Warehouse Operator Dies at 64, Following Five-Week Illness
Started In Produce Here In 1899
Identified With Many Movements to Benefit Citizens and Community

Philip Wallace Hiden, 64, who, over a period of 37 years, built one of the largest shipping and warehouse storage businesses on the Atlantic seaboard, died yesterday afternoon at 3:45 at Riverside hospital following an illness of five weeks.

He started his career as a telegraph operator for the Chesapeake & Ohio railway at Fredericks Hall at the age of 19. With the war came opportunities for a broader service which gained for him the confidence of railway officials in the handling of vast shipments of timber and horses.

Locating in Newport News shortly after the city became incorporated, he attained before many years a place as a citizen of the first order. He became mayor of the city when the new form of government was established and was among the leaders who sponsored change in administrative affairs at that time. He urges and was largely responsible for the purchase of the water works of the city and also for the reorganization of Riverside hospital.

Mr. Hiden was the son of Philip Barbour Hiden of Orange county and Betty Hawes Goodwin of Louisa county. He was born in Orange county, and when he was 15 the family moved to Fluvanna, where he attended school. Later he was a student at William and Mary college, but at 19 he cut short his college studies to accept a position as telegraph operator. Within several years he had held posts as agent at practically every station between Fredericks Hall and Old Point, and long after he had left the service he held by proxy the agency at Oyster Point, which he relinquished around 1924.

Mr. Hiden came to Newport News in 1899. He was a youth, still in his 20s. Forming a partnership with H. B. Walker, the two went into the wholesale produce business under the firm name of Hiden and Walker. The business thrived and later Mr. Hiden added wood and building timber to the firm's activities.

In 1904 the firm dissolved and Mr. Hiden retained the wood and timber business which became the basis of extensive operations during the years just prior to and during the world war.

Big Shipper of Timber.

He acquired large holdings of wood and timber in various parts of Virginia and engaged in the shipment of timber cargoes through the local port.

Meanwhile, he married Miss Martha Woodroof of Detmold, near Coleman's Falls, Bedford county, June 23, 1909.

Mr. Hiden's relations with the Chesapeake & Ohio railway had resulted in a mutual faith between himself and the railroad officials as a result of many transactions during the years following establishment here in 1899. Consequently, when the flood of 1913 visited the area around Cincinnati, the railroad asked Mr. Hiden to take charge of the shipment of vast quantities of timber from the east to take care of emergency construction work, especially of bridges and other necessary facilities that had been washed away.

A study of the forest regions of the east had given Mr. Hiden an excellent conception of where timber could be obtained. Despite the short notice, he boarded a freight train directed to several points in Maryland and after directing the loading of a number of trains he went to Cincinnati to direct the unloading and aid in other ways in the emergency.

A year later most of the nations of the Old World were engaged in an unprecedented conflict. Horses by the thousands were needed as quickly as they could be obtained and shipped abroad. Newport News became a port of embarkation for animals, and later for men. France, Belgium and Spain were clamoring for horses. The British remount commission was pressing the governments for shipments as rapidly as they could be obtained. Again the railroad here went to Mr. Hiden in another emergency, something new and different from floods, but with confidence that he would direct the work effectively, and explained the requirements of feeding and taking care of thousands of horses to be shipped through the port to the nations named.

During the period of the world war, he shipped 560,000 horses, and lost only 1 percent, according to records of H. Sidney SMith, Mr. Hiden's "right-hand man."

Soon after the close of the conflict, Mr. Hiden relinquished his interest in wood and timber shipments, although he devoted some time to disposing of forests and other kindred matters incident to the embarkation activities of the port.

Establishes New Business

Then came another era in his career as a leader of shipping activities here. In 1922 he acquired the warehouses near Morrison which had been used by the United States government as an aviation supply base. This brought about the establishment of the Hiden Storage and Forwarding company. The business developed into a vast tobacco storage project when a group of warehouses at Newport News which also had been owned by the government in its port of embarkation activities were acquired by Mr. Hiden and utilized for his storage business. The business continued to grow until it became necessary to procure additional storage facilities and this was provided through the erection of additional buildings.

Some years ago he moved into an unpretentious office on the second floor at 2617 Washington avenue. A plain sign outside attached to the second floor and well above the straight vision of pedestrians was the only display Mr. Hiden ever authorized to indicate a business that probably had no rival in growth and extent in the east.

As Civic Leader

While serving as mayor he became interested in the acquisition of the old water corporation by the city and finally succeeded in completing those negotiations. He was the first and only chairman of the water works commission, a position he held at the time of his death.

Mr. Hiden's interest in the community where his life's work had been crowned with marked success and achievement included several different fields of service. His knowledge of the port and its shipping facilities led to his appointment as a member of the Virginia State port commission and he was also actively identified with the local and State chambers of commerce.

About the time when Mr. Hiden became mayor of the city, he an W. B. Livezy and Homer L. Ferguson were requested to look into the affairs of the Riverside hospital with a view to reorganize the institution under some new financial agreement that would save it from being returned to the trustees. The three local leaders conferred over the problem and reached an agreement to appoint a board of governors in connection with a program which they thought would mean the operation of the hospital upon a more successful basis. It was agreed that each of the three conferees would name one member of the board. L. U. Noland was named by Mr. Hiden; R. L. Henderson by Mr. Ferguson; H. Sidney Smith by Mr. Livezey; and Judge John B. Locke and George T. Hardy were named at large. The subsequent years attested the judgement of the first efforts of the group in re-establishment of the hospital - and achievement which friends said Mr. Hiden was especially proud.

Mr. Hiden's keen interest in the community and its people was displayed on occasion about the same time the Colonial State bank failed here. Its affairs were taken over by two other local banking institutions and Mr. Hiden agreed to take the worthless paper, running into thousands of dollars. If the two banks would assume all other obligations and repay the depositors dollar for dollar.

Aided Bank Depositors

This gesture made possible the saving to a large number of persons here of money they had placed in the defunct bank.

Through the latter years of his life, Mr. Hiden continued a keen interest in the affairs of the city. Until he became ill, he was actively engaged in business. Recently he bought Washington square from the C. & O. railway and negotiated a deal with Montgomery Ward whereby that concern will soon occupy a four story building to be built by the Hiden heirs.

Surviving relatives include his wife, Mrs. P. W. Hiden; four daughters, Mrs. Delano McKelvey of Washington; Miss Suzanne Hiden of this city, Miss Frances Hiden of this city, Miss Georgia Hiden of New York; one son, P. W. Hiden Jr., student at Dartmouth college. Also there are three brothers and two sisters, Dr. Martin B. Hiden of Warrenton, W. C. Hiden of Baltimore, G. George Hiden of Richmond, Mrs. W. S. Hoge of Washington and Miss Nannie Hiden.

Funeral services will take place tomorrow morning at 9 at the residence, 5600 Huntington avenue. A brief service will be conducted here by the Rev. J. Keith M. Lee, rector of St. Paul's Episcopal church, and the cortege will then proceed to Spring Hill cemetery, near Lynchburg, where burial will take place.

Active pallbearers will be P. W. Murray, R. M. Lett, R. P. Holt, A. S. Johnson, H. S. Smith Sr., L. C. Spengler, H. T. Parker.

Honorary pallbearers will be Homer L. Ferguson, L. U. Noland, S. W. Holt, A. T. Lowmaster of Richmond, G. D. Brooke of Richmond, A. G. Harwwod Jr. of Lee Hall, Robert Button of Culpeper, Dr. C. B. Courtney, Dr. J. S. Beavers, S. H. Plummer, Judge John B. Locke, J. C. Biggins, W. T. Chapin, C. D. West, T. J. Hundley, W. B. Livezey, J. Scott Parrish of Richmond, W. A. Cox of Norfolk, W. H. Maher of Norfolk, E. P. Goodwin of Richmond, Garland Gray of Waverly, H. S. Barbee of Norfolk, Marshall King of Alexandria, H. A. Keitz, and Major Raymond B. Bottom; also friends of the family and officials of the C. & O. from Cincinnati and Richmond.
~~~~~~~~~~
The Gloucester Gazette (Virginia),
Thurs, 29 October 1936, p5, c4

Newport News - Philip W. Hiden, 64, who started as a telegraph operator for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway, died here Sunday afternoon after a five week's illness. At the time of his death he controlled the largest warehouse and shipping operations in this section, the achievement representing the result of a career of 37 years in waterfront and railroad activities here.

Funeral services took place at the home at 9 a.m. Tuesday with the Rev. J. Keith M. Lee, rector of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, officiating. Burial was in Spring Hill Cemetery in Lynchburg.

Mr. Hiden was born in Orange County, the son of Philip Barbour Hiden. His mother was Miss Betty Hawes Goodwin of Louisa County. He came to Newport News in 1899 after serving as a telegraph operator for the railroad several years and established a wholesale produce business.


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