Col Thomas Leonard Livermore

Col Thomas Leonard Livermore

Birth
Galena, Jo Daviess County, Illinois, USA
Death
9 Jan 1918 (aged 73)
Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, USA
Burial
Milford, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
Memorial ID
46939706 View Source

Livermore was born Febuary 7, 1844 in Galena, Illinois. He was a student at Lombard University in Galesburg and was expecting daily an appointment to West Point when the Civil war began. Livermore went to Washington in hopes of expediting the appointment. Failing in that, and caught in the patriotic fervor of the hour, he enlisted in the 1st New Hampshire. Soon he was a line officer in the 5th New Hampshire, and by wars end he was a colonel in command of the 18th New Hampshire.

With the coming of peace, Livermore gained admittance to the bar and established a law practice in Boston. He also devoted 7 years to managing the Amoskeag Mills in Manchester, N.H., and twenty-one years as vice president of the Calumet & Hecla mining company. His full, rich career ended one January 9, 1918, in Boston. One eulogist said of him:
"Of martial figure with a face inviting confidence, with a voice sounding sincerity, joined to engaging manners and native joyousness, he disarmed criticism and won men by the mere force of personality. As one got below the surface, he found a rare sense of justice, clean cut integrity, desire for service, intelligent appreciation of men and events, sobriety of judgement, and measureless patriotism."

Not a native of New Hampshire he became one of its most distinguished soldiers as well as its best-known writer of war history.

Bio by: JFJN

Livermore was born Febuary 7, 1844 in Galena, Illinois. He was a student at Lombard University in Galesburg and was expecting daily an appointment to West Point when the Civil war began. Livermore went to Washington in hopes of expediting the appointment. Failing in that, and caught in the patriotic fervor of the hour, he enlisted in the 1st New Hampshire. Soon he was a line officer in the 5th New Hampshire, and by wars end he was a colonel in command of the 18th New Hampshire.

With the coming of peace, Livermore gained admittance to the bar and established a law practice in Boston. He also devoted 7 years to managing the Amoskeag Mills in Manchester, N.H., and twenty-one years as vice president of the Calumet & Hecla mining company. His full, rich career ended one January 9, 1918, in Boston. One eulogist said of him:
"Of martial figure with a face inviting confidence, with a voice sounding sincerity, joined to engaging manners and native joyousness, he disarmed criticism and won men by the mere force of personality. As one got below the surface, he found a rare sense of justice, clean cut integrity, desire for service, intelligent appreciation of men and events, sobriety of judgement, and measureless patriotism."

Not a native of New Hampshire he became one of its most distinguished soldiers as well as its best-known writer of war history.

Bio by: JFJN