Rasmus Julius Smith

Rasmus Julius Smith

Birth
Denmark
Death 7 Aug 1929 (aged 85)
Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah, USA
Burial Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah, USA
Plot B-18-12-5
Memorial ID 46559693 · View Source
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THE LIFE HISTORY OF RASMUS JULIUS SMITH 1843-1929
By Donna Smith Packer (condensed to fit)
As one looks at the photograph bearing the kindly, well-lined face of Rasmus Julius Smith, age 84, holding a granddaughter on his knee, one would scarcely believe the variety his life has held.
He saw the sun rise for eleven years in his homeland of Denmark. New days also began as he saw the rising sun over the vast ocean, the desert plains: as it tipped the mountains of Montana and Wyoming , an Indian teepee; as it came over the Wasatch Range near his last home in Brigham City, as he arose early to care for fruit trees, vegetables, and berries.
Danish, English, and Shoshone Indian languages were the tongues he could understand and speak.
Rasmus Julius had witnessed the pangs of near starvation and loneliness in the Montana wilderness, as well as the satisfaction of gathering his large family around the long table at 549 North Main Street in Brigham City. There the parents would supply each child with food Josefina and he had provided by the tilling of the earth. Often the table provided for the passers-by or a Lamanite friend, for no one was turned away from the Smith home.
The kindly countenance of Rasmus Julius, or Erastus Julius, was well-earned. Love of the Gospel and his earthly family, as well as those who had passed away, was exhibited by work. The scriptures say, "By their fruits ye shall know them." One cannot observe the family members as they, in 1975, contribute to community and church, without seeing the evidence of the character of Rasmus Julius and Josefina B. Beckman Smith.
Surely it took the teamwork of these two, who were the salt of the earth, to create this noble posterity.
One cannot leaf through the large black temple book, observing the hundreds of names of kindred dead with baptisms or endowments or sealing dates in order without catching the insight to this highly spiritual man.
Rasmus Julius was a bit adventuresome in his youth, but the largest part of his years were spent in simple family life, and the last twenty years were spent in genealogical research and temple work.
It is only a photograph of an elderly grandfather with a kindly, lined face, but it is also the face of one who has had a lifetime of varied experiences—difficult and easy—that has produced the kindness and love that encompasses his being.
1843 – Rasmus Julius Smith was born August 20, 1843 at Foldbjaerg, Vraa Parish, Hjørring County, Denmark. He was the only child of Juliane Sørensdatter. The father was listed as Rasmus Smith of Sønderhaven Farm, Serridslev Parish. Hjørring County. Juliane had previously worked as a housekeeper for Rasmus Smith. Her son was christened on the 24th of August, 1843, at the Vraa Parish in the Lutheran Church. Friderich Christian Sorensen was a witness at the christening of Julius. Friderich lived, at this time, at Oster Brondeers lev Parish near Vraa Parish until the first part of 1845.
The 21st of October, 1843, Juliane Sørensdatter moved to Ravnstrup in Orum Parish, Hjørring County, Rasmus Julius was evidently left with relatives or friends, but it is not known where or with whom. Family tradition seems to indicate that he lived for at least part of his childhood with his mother's brother, Friderich Chirstian Sørensen, who was a school teacher.
Friderich married on October 24, 1845 at Frederikshavn, Hjørring County. On October 25, 1846 his first child was born at Aalborg, Vor Frue Parish, Aalborg County, and they lived here until the summer of 1847. On February 9, 1849 a second child was born at Saeby, Hjørring County, and Friderich lived here the rest of his life. Perhaps Julius lived in some of these parishes with his Uncle Friderich.
1845 – The 1st of February, 1845, Juliane is shown on the 1845 census at Ravnstrup, Orum Parish, Hjørring County. Rasmus Julius is not listed with her. However, according to the military levying rolls, in 1846 Rasmus Julius moved to Hjørring City, but it is not known who he stayed with while there.
1850 – On the 1st of February, 1850, Juliane is shown at Aalborg City, Aalborg County, on the census. Ramsus Julius evidently was still living with relatives, as he is not shown on this census.
1852 – The 14th of November, 1852, Juliane embraced the Gospel of Jesus Christ and was baptized a member of the Church at Aalbory City by F. Thomsen and confirmed by H.P. Jensen. She was baptized in freezing water where the ice had to be cut away. Evidently it was after this that Juliane brought Rasmus Julius to live with her.
1853 – On the 18th of April in 1853, as spring was coming to Denmark, Juliane and Rasmus Julius left Aalborg and journeyed to Copenhagen. As they bid that city goodbye they had been used to meeting in small homes for church services. Little did they realize that in 1907 a beautiful chapel would be constructed where the Saints would be meeting.
The 26th of December, 1853, Juliane and Rasmus Julius sailed from Copenhagen on the steamship "Elderen," bound for Liverpool, England. On the 9th of January 1854, the boat docked in Liverpool. On the 22nd of January, 1854, Juliane and Rasmus Julius and other emigrants went on board the ship, "Benjamin Adams" and on the 24th the doctor examined the emigrants.
1854 – On the 28th of January, 1854, the "Benjamin Adams" sailed from Liverpool, England, bound for New Orleans. The list of passengers showed Juliane Sorensen, age 38, and Rasmus Julius Sorensen, age 10.
During the eight weeks on the ocean the saints were kept busy mending their own wearing apparel, sewing wagon covers, and participating in school and church meetings.
On the 22nd of March, 1854, the "Benjamin Adams" arrived at New Orleans. Three days later the company of immigrants with which Juliane and Rasmus Julius were traveling, continued the journey from New Orleans by steamboat, the "L.M. Kennet." On the 3rd of April, 1854, the "L.M. Kennet" arrived at St. Louis, Missouri. Here an organized branch of the Church existed and the immigrants joined the former company which had crossed the Atlantic on the "Jesse Munn." Hans Peter Olsen became the leader of all, and under him the survivors of both companies continued the journey by steamboat to Kansas City in Jackson County, Missouri, which had been selected as the outfitting place for the Saints who crossed the plains that year.
The Scandinavian immigrants made their encampment near Westport. Some time was spent in preparing for the trip west. On May 9th six captains were chose over ten wagons each. This meant about eleven persons per wagon. Brother William Empy acted as the church emigration agent that year on the frontier to help the Saints organize.
On June 15th after prayer and breakfast, the Saints started their long journey west. They traveled about two miles the first day, but usually averaged eight to ten miles a day the rest of the journey.
Christen J. Larsen kept a diary of the journey and he recorded marriages, deaths, births, meetings, killing of buffalo on July 28th, and an Indian scare on August 21st. He also recorded that a company from Salt Lake met them with flour and other needed supplies on September 12th. On October 5th he recorded, "This day we reached the end of your long journey and made our final camp in Salt Lake City at six o'clock p.m. (Christen J. Larsen's journal, 1:101-110).
The 5th of October 1854, according to Andrew Jensen's church chronology on page 52, "Elder Hans Peter Olsen's company of immigrants saints, including the Scandinavians, arrived in Salt Lake City. Many had died from cholera while crossing the plains."
We understand Julius did not become ill, he walked from Missouri to Salt Lake City.
In October of 1854 Juliane and Ramsus Julius went directly to Brigham City and settled. Juliane worked there for H.P. Jensen, the missionary who had confirmed her. Family tradition suggest that Juliane and her son stayed at the home of H.P. Jensen that first winter.
On the 5th of November, 1854, Juliane was rebaptized at Brigham City, according to the records.
1855 – The 30th of March, 1855, Rasmus Julius was baptized by H. P. Jensen in Brigham City.
In the spring of 1855, Rasmus Julius went to work for George Hampsen. He did farm work and fencing of property.
According to the records, on July 3, 1855, Juliane was sealed as a second wife in polygamy to Jorgen Christian Pedersen who was commonly known as John Petersen. They were sealed by Brigham Young in the president's office in Salt Lake City.
About December of 1855, Rasmus Julius, at age 14, and his mother walked to Ogden to obtain work with a silversmith and watch repairman by the name of Mohoney, a person form Nauvoo. According to stories told by Millicent, the twelfth child of Rasmus Julius and Josefina, and William Waldamer the 14th child, this was a difficult period in Rasmus Julius' life.
His mother had made these arrangements because she desired that he should learn a trade and apparently Mr. Mahoney was rather strict and demanding. Rasmus Julius was lonesome and he left his employer and went home to his mother. Juliane again took him by the hand and took him back to Mahoney, because they had made a commitment that she felt they must follow through, and that Rasmus Julius must have a trade by which he could make a living.
Apparently he did stay with him for a while, for in later years he was capable of repairing any clock. Family members recall the kitchen table being strewn with clock pieces as he slowly reassembled the clocks into working order.
1857-58 – In 1857 or 1858 Rasmus Julius, with another young companion, went to Camp Floyd with was 18 miles west of Lehi in Cedar Valley and got a job herding cows for a sergeant. Shortly afterwards they had orders for the company to move to Ft. Bridger, Wyoming. Rasmus Julius went along to herd cows. He stayed there for three years.
1861- In approximately 1861 Rasmus Julius went to Montana to secure employment on a ranch as a herder. You will recall in United States history, Lincoln was president of our country from 1860 to 1865. Of course this was thousands of miles to the east, but I would imagine that word would have gotten to Rasmus Julius in Montana. It was during this period of time, according to Millicent and William, and also a life story written by a daughter, Lillian, that he obtained work for $75.00 per month , and board. This was an increase from what he had been getting in Ft. Bridger which was only $30 a month.
The days in Montana were not all easy. At times Rasmus Julius found it necessary to sustain life by eating from the garbage placed behind the eating houses. He never would allow his children to waste food or be unappreciative of their blessings, for you see, he knew what it was to be hungry.
One night he was alone in the ranch house as all the other men had gone out for the evening. He thumbed through the Book of Mormon indifferently, and said out loud, "It's a lie!" He heard a voice say, "It isn't a lie and you know it." Rasmus Julius could hardly believe his ears, so he repeated, "It's a lie," again and again. The voice answered him three times. He searched all over the premises but he couldn't find anyone around.
Lincoln gave his famous Gettysburg Address on November 19, 1863, and on March 4, 1865 he gave that famous address, "With malice towards none, with charity for all…"
1865 – On April 9, 1865 the war ended with the surrender of Robert E. Lee to General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse. It might be interesting to note also that in 1861 the transcontinental telegraph, connecting the eastern part of the United States with California, was completed. Our first paper money was issued by the federal government under the Constitution, authorized by Congress in 1861. Mail delivery was established in 1863 and soon spread throughout the country. This is of great interest to us because we have letters that were written by or for Juliane and Rasmus Julius to their family in Denmark. These letters dated from 1870 to 1911.
Also, the Homestead Act, passed by Congress in 1862, allowed any settler to obtain 160 acres of public land without charge.
1867 - About 1867 we find that Rasmus Julius married Anna Anthony, who was from the Fort Hall, Idaho area. A girl child, Berdina Anthony Smith was born about 1868. Anna Anthony and the child both died shortly afterwards. Undoubtedly this was a very difficult time for Rasmus Julius.
1868 – In 1868 he was taken seriously ill with inflammatory rheumatism and had to be under a doctor's care for eighteen months. It was during this time his spirit left his body. He looked down and saw his body and the people crying around him. He heard someone say, "He is gone." He got back into his body again. He told his children later, "It's easy leaving the body, but it's hard to get back into it again."
Rasmus Julius remained very ill. The doctors gave him up, saying he would never live. When Rasmus Julius heard that the doctor was not coming any more, he became humble and prayed to God to restore him and he promised to come to Box Elder, Utah, and receive the Gospel. His mother lived in Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah.
He regained some strength and as soon as he was able his friends helped him to mount his horse and he started his journey from Montana to Brigham City.
While riding through sagebrush in Idaho he thought of his mother. He felt impressed to throw away his pipe that had become a habit the past few years. He traveled on but soon the desire for a smoke seized him. He returned northward, but could not find the pipe. He prayed for strength and headed south again, never returning to that habit again.
As he rode into Brigham City he saw the children coming home from school. They were Latter-day Saint children learning of Americanism. And he wept for joy.
He rode to his mother's small home just east of the courthouse. His mother welcomed him with open arms and soon the whole town knew of his return. Many came to greet him, to admire his pinto horse, handsome bridle, saddle, and chaps; and to rejoice with Juliane.
Undoubtedly Julian had prayed frequently that her son would accept the gospel and return home. She must have had some very lonely years during the time he was in Wyoming and Montana. But now her prayers had been answered and her joy was complete. In Julian's life, surely this occasion was second only to her baptism. Rasmus Julius is listed on the 1870 census in Brigham City with his mother.
1870 – Thomas Christian Andersen, who had married Juliane's sister Caroline, wrote to his daughter Marie on the 28th of January, 1870. As a little P.S. on the greeting to his daughter he comments that, "Julius and his mother send greeting to your mother and brother from them." T.C. Andersen lived in Mantua, Utah, and of course being a relative always kept in close contact with Juliane and Rasmus Julius.
Also in 1870 Rasmus Julius was rebaptized in the old mill pond in Brigham City by Stephen White, and confirmed by H.P. Jensen. That same evening he was ordained a teacher in the Lesser Priesthood by Peter Forsgren.
1870-71 – Rasmus Julius apparently acquired a home. In a letter of Julian's to her sister Caroline, it states, after she has pleaded for Caroline to come to Utah with her two children to be with her husband, T.C. Andersen, "Julius has also a house and he says that you can live at his place as long as you desire. He is not yet married. Maybe he will before you come. If you were here we could have many happy days together." Apparently Caroline had not received the gospel, and she refused to come to Utah with her husband.
The 2nd of February, 1871, in a letter from T.C. Andersen to his daughter Marie, it states, "Tell your mother hello from her sister and from Julius. They miss you."
Rasmus Julius did obtain a house and ½ city block of property for $250, according to a deed that is in the possession of William Waldamer Smith. It states:
"Mayors Deed.
Date of Instrument- May 8, 1873."
(This would have been two days prior to the birth and death of his child, Julius, Jr.)
The deed further states:
"Received February 28, 1886 in Book H of Deeds, page 483. Kind of Inst. U.S. Patent. Date of Inst. – May 1, 1872.
Grantor: U.S. America
Grantee: Mayor of Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah Territory, Chester Loveland
Signed: President U.S. Grant
Recorded July 17, 1872 in Book C of Deeds, page 192
There was also the name of G. B. Overton on that particular document. Son William thought that Overton probably settled on the property and built the house about October 9, 1869, but he didn't have a deed because then the land was granted to the U.S. of America. But on May 1, 1872 it was granted to the mayor and he granted it to "Arastus J. Smith" on May 8, 1873. He had an ownership receipt, but Rasmus Julius had no title until May 8, 1873.
Rasmus Julius dug post holes around the whole plot and set in cedar posts. It was here he raised his family.
Family tradition tells that when Rasmus Julius was ill in Montana he had a dream where he saw a beautiful young girl and thought that she was to be his wife. Rasmus Julius has told son, William, that when he did come to Brigham City he saw this beautiful girl in the same calico dress that he had seen in his dream. This was Josefina Bernhardina Beckman, the daughter of a very good friend to his mother Juliane.
In August 1871 Rasmus Julius was ordained an elder.
On the 7th of August 1871, Rasmus Julius and Josefina Bernhardina Beckman received their endowments in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. That same day they were sealed in the Endowment House for time and all eternity. And so we see that his dream of the future had been fulfilled.
Josefina was the daughter of Andreas or Anders Beckman and Christina Amalia Andersdatter. She was born April 29, 1855 at Gustavi Domkyrko Parish in Goteborg City, Bohus County, Sweden.
1872 – On the 10th of May 1872, Julius Junior Smith, first child of Rasmus Julius and Josefina was born at Brigham City. He was named after his father who usually went by the name of Julius. This child died the same day. I would think this was a very difficult thing for Julius to face onece again the loss of a child.
He received a patriarchal blessing on December 16 of 1872, a few months after the death of his first child by Josefina. This blessing was given by John Smith. It states in this blessing that he was born on August 20, 1844, but we have since documented the year as 1843 in Vraa Parish, Denmark.
The blessing comments, "Thou shalt be an instrument in the hands of the Lord in doing much good and thy name shall be handed down to thy posterity in honorable remembrance from generation to generation and if thou will seek wisdom, thou shall sit in counsel with the saints and exhort thy brethren to faithfulness. And thy days and years shall be many and thy inheritance shall be on the mount numbered with the fathers in Israel. Thou shalt gather of this world's goods around thee all which shall be necessary in life and shall be able to feed many in times of scarcity."
It is interesting that in a letter dated December 1, 1896, to "Dear Old Aunt" (Caroline) he mentions this:
"We have a good land here, fruitful both with fruit, wheat, potatoes, and clear water which is flowing down from the mountains so that we can water our gardens and fields and our stock can get all that they need. Everything looks nice in the summer. In the winter we have a little snow, but seldom as cold as Denmark, and it's seldom windy. So the Lord has given us a good, pleasant land. And the best of all is that we are satisfied in our position."
I have always thought that last statement, "And the best of all is that we are satisfied in our position," gave us an insight into Rasmus Julius. He was content with little. Food to eat, and a place to house his family, and he was constantly sharing the good things of life with his friends, especially those of the Lamanites. His son William comments, that never did the Indians come through Brigham City but they were sent with baskets of fruit and vegetables so that they could feed their families.
William recalls his father rising to his feet often in Fast and Testimony Meeting and bearing his testimony. Rasmus Julius knew the gospel had been restored and that the Church is true. He would often mention his witness that Joseph Smith was a prophet. Surely the bearing of his testimony and the living of a righteous life had profound effect upon his family.
1873 – On April 13, 1873, Juliane Sorensen, mother of Rasmus Julius Smith, died in Brigham City. With her son home and with the knowledge that he had accepted the gospel, Juliane undoubtedly left this life as a happy, contented person.
Julius remembered his mother as a faithful woman who sacrificed much for the love of the gospel. She taught him the way of truth. It was this knowledge of her love that helped him return to Brigham City after many years of being on his own. For many years cemeteries were not tended, but he would clear off his mother's grave and counseled his children to never neglect his beloved mother's grave.
On the 29th of September, 1873, Joseph Emanuel Smith was born at Brigham City.
We have a letter dated the 10th of March,, 1874, telling of the engagement of his cousin, Marie Andersen, daughter of T.C. Andersen and Caroline who was a sister to Juliane.
T. C. Andersen was a conscientious father as I observed in various letters that he had written to his daughter Marie, and his son, Carl. He advised them continually. In a letter dated January 28, 1870, he comments, "Use your common sense. Then you will know evil and good, and God will help you and lead you in your path here on the earth and to eternal life."
He comments again in a later letter to Marie, "I believe you are a good sensible girl and are keeping yourself free of all sin and evil. Let no one lead you astray in order to devil your body but give attention to the good and clean I have previously told you about. Train yourself in sewing and knitting and other benefactual things."
In commenting to Marie about her brother, Carl, who was going to be a goldsmith, he said, "That would be good. Tell him hello for me. He must be diligent in learning his trade."
Later in that same letter of February 2nd, 1871, he said, "I hope you are a good sensible girl, little Marie. Be careful of the difficult situations in life and then it will be well with you."
On the 10th of March, 1875, in another letter to Marie from her father he comments about a photograph that Marie had sent of her husband, because he said, "I see that he is well-built. I thank you for the pictures. It was a true joy for me to see you. I thank you for the information about my family and I thank you for the invitation to your wedding."
T. C. Andersen apparently passed away prior to a letter of the 30th of October, 1906, because Julius was writing to his cousin Marie and commented, "You asked about your father's address. But that is no easy matter now. He is on the other side of the grave."
Surely Rasmus Julius did miss this uncle, T. C. Andersen, because he was his only relative in this country.
It is interesting that a letter received in 1957, addressed to the descendants of Rasmus Julius Smith, Box Elder, Utah, from Caroline Petersen of Vesterbro 45, Aalborg, Denmark, stated some old letters could be sent to us if we wanted them. Shortly after a package of letters dating from 1868 to 1911 were received by Glenn A. Smith. They were written by T.C. Andersen and Rasmus Julius Smith. These letters helped particularly to verify Julius's and his mother's birth dates because of references to a stepfather Bertle Larsen, Aunt Caroline and Uncle Frederik brother and sister to Juliane.
1875 – The 5th of October, 1875, Juliann Smith was born in Brigham City. This child was named in memory of Rasmus Julius' mother.
Following the establishment of four Brigham City wards and the organization of the stake in 1877, nearly all the wards in the stake began to build meeting houses. Up until this time Brigham City was all one ward and they met in the court house. In the summer meetings were held in the old bowery on 3rd West and Forest St. This is the spot that Brigham Young preached his last public sermon prior to his death on August 29, 1877.
1877 – The 28th of November, 1877, Erastus Julius Smith, Jr. was born in Brigham City. He was named after his father who is sometimes known as Erastus Julius.
On October 28, 1879, Erastus Julius Smith, Jr. died at Brigham City. He was just under two years of age.
1880 – The 13th of August, 1880, Hulda Amelia Smith was born at Brigham City. She was named after Josefina's mother, Christina Amelia, who in her later life was known as Hulda Amelia.
1882 – On the date of April 1, 1883, another tragedy hit the Smith home, for eight-year-old Joseph Emanuel Smith died at Brigham City.
In 1882 Rasmus Julius was called to work at the Logan Temple. After discussing this with Millicent and William we understand that he did walk from Brigham City to Logan, going up over the hill at Flat Bottom area and then down through Dry Canyon over to Logan. He would leave every Monday morning early, and then come home Saturday night. He carried the mortar to the plasterers as they worked on the temple.
You might be interested in a letter dated February 25, 1884, by the superintendent, C.O. Law. He commented that, "the letter certified that Brother Julius Smith of Brigham City had worked faithfully and honorably on the Logan Temple for nearly two years, and as the temple nears completion, hi branch of the labor having terminated, he is now honorably released and we sincerely trust that Brother Smith may become a participant in the blessings of the House of the Lord which he has assisted to erect."
The hope of the superintendent was realized because Rasmus Julius was able, later in life, to obtain information about his own ancestors and have their work done in the Logan Temple; and many living descendants have also been endowed and sealed in the Logan Temple.
During the time that he worked on the Logan Temple, a daughter, Sylvia Jurinda Smith, was born in Brigham City on the 27th of December, 1882.
1885 - The 6th of January, 1885, Victor Josephus Smith was born in Brigham City. He was the first son then to be born and live to maturity.
1887 – The 25th of January, 1887, Josephine Smith, named after her mother, was born in Brigham City.
1888 – The 30th of September, 1888, Rose Ellen Smith was born at Brigham City. It is of interest that Rose was in the first graduating class of the Box Elder High School along with three other students. She later taught school in Clear Creek. She must have had a special spirit about her, because the first paycheck she ever received, part was given to her father so that he could do research on his ancestors.
1891 - The 22nd of December, 1891, Lillian LaVon Smith was born at Brigham City.
1894 - A beautiful girl, Violet Stella, was born at Brigham City on March 18, 1894.
You might wonder how this slightly built man, only about 5 feet in height, could sustain so many children. I'm sure his bright blue deep-set eyes would brighten as he would relate life was not easy but most worthwhile. He worked in the hills peeling bark for a tanner, Mr. Hilman. After this he worked for right years in the United Order and Co-Op in Brigham City. He had a few acres on Sixth North and Main Street where he raised fruits and vegetables, strawberries and tomatoes. They would have ½ acre of raspberries and 2 acres of strawberries which required much hard work early and late. When the cases were filled with ripe fruit they would be loaded on a wagon. His bay horse would be hitched to it and he and his son Willie would take them up to Horsley's. They would buy and ship fruit all over the West. Horsely's always welcomed their fruit because it was choice and the baskets well filled.
Julius also mixed the mud for various brick and stone masons. At one time he owned 160 acres in Blue Creek Valley which he sold to Chris Freeze who married his oldest daughter Juliann. He also had a ten-acre orchard at 500 North 400 East in Brigham City.
Rasmus Julius would call his family together in daily family prayer. Chair backs were turned to the breakfast table and prayers were offered by father and occasionally mother or a child. They were grateful for worldly blessings and they desired to express their appreciation to the Lord. Granddaughter Florence Cheadle Dunn, Millicent, and William, recall Rasmus Julius' prayers were lengthy, perhaps 30 minutes, as he gave gratitude and asked blessings on the family and the brethren. Josefina's prayers were much shorter, but meaningful. Undoubtedly she was as sincere, but understood a child's attention span is short.
No face cards were allowed in the home. In his youth Rasmus Julius had lost forty hard-earned dollars in three hands of cards. He knew the dangers of gambling- savings lost, and sometimes life, for he had seen men shot over a card game. Those early experiences, and counsel by the Church made him firm in his stand that no cards were allowed.
In the fall the family would gather around the long kitchen table and the annual earnings were brought out in a long leather purse. First the tithing dollars were put in a pile, then the coal money was set aside, then money for ten sacks of flour, and so on down the list. Then each child was given a few coins for helping with the picking of the fruit. Each year it was the same, tithing first, etc., a great visual lesson for the family.
Easter celebrations stared the day before when Grandma Lindahl (Josefina's mother) brought over a large hand-woven basket of leghorn eggs. Dyes were made by boiling various plant leaves. Violet, who was so creative, was usually in charge of preparing the dye.
The Fourth of July, July 24th, and Peach Days were always celebrated and the Smith children looked forward to them. One Peach Day Lillian was put in charge of Millicent, William, and Florence. They dressed early, anxious to get up town and see the parade. Each clutching 10¢, they walked the six blocks to town. They observed the horse-drawn sprinkling wagon and delighted to see the water dampening the dusty dirt Main Street. They were excited to tell the folks about the "parade" and returned home before the 11 a.m. parade time. Millicent laughs as she recalls that experience.
1896 – On January 4, 1896, Utah became the 45th state in the Union. The large bell which was hanging in the tower of the courthouse in Brigham City was rung that day with so much jubilation that it was cracked. Surely the Smith family heard the bell toll.
Tragedy hit the Brigham City area as reported in the Deseret News dated Sunday, February 9, 1896, just shortly after Utah had become a state. The article records that the tabernacle in Brigham City was destroyed by fire and that Rudger Clawson estimated the loss was $12,000. (the actual date of the fire was February 7th.)
The article continued, "The inhabitants of Box Elder have of late been erecting meetinghouses in their respective wards, and this, together with stringent times, has place them in a bad plight with regards to the re-erection of their tabernacle. They have, however, resolved to commence its reconstruction right away."
I thought it interesting that even though they had "stringent" times, the people of that area rallied together and by March 21 1897, just a little more than a year later, the tabernacle was dedicated.
Some of those present at the dedication were: George Q. Cannon, Lorenzo Snow, Franklin D. Richards, William B. Preston, Seyour B. Young, Charles F. Middleton, and George Q. Cannon offered the dedicatory prayer.
In the talk prior to the dedicatory prayer, George Q. Cannon commented that President Woodruf sent his regards and was sorry that he could not attend, but he was ill. Brother Cannon said, "The work of the Lord is increasing in the earth. There are now one thousand, three hundred elders (1300) out in the mission field."
Meetings were held at 10, 2, and 7 p.m. The cost of the new building was $15,117.25. At the beginning of the first meeting they still owed $22.21, and that was collected that afternoon so the building was dedicated.
Rasmus Julius helped with the erection of the old Brigham City Tabernacle as well as the new. He was especially capable of mixing the "mud" and carrying it to the masons. Even though he was small in stature, he was strong.
On The 14th of April, 1896, Millicent Caroline Smith was born at Brigham City, and this child was named after Rasmus Julius' Aunt Caroline, sister to Juliane Sorensen, who had stayed in Denmark.
In a letter dated the 1st of December, 1896, Julius does comment that he has mailed a photograph of the little girl that was named after Caroline. In this letter also, he expresses to his auntie that he was so desirable of some information about his own family, anything that she could send to him, as he was anxious because he did miss his mother and commented that, "I have no family here except my wife and children."
We feel that Rasmus Julius was always conscious of those that had passed on, because earlier in that year, July 3, 1896, he had been sealed to Bertha Larsen and Johanne Larsen. They were been relatives of his wife Josefina Bernhardina Beckman. These sealings were done in the Logan Temple.
1898 – March 5, 1898 must have been a joyous occasion in the Rasmus Julius Smith household, because Julius was ordained a high priest by William L. Watkins.
The 10th of August that same year Emma Smith was born at Brigham City. But she passed away the 25th of August and once again sadness had come into their home.
Lorenzo Snow who had resident in Brigham City for some 40 years of his life, returned to Brigham City on the 23rd of September, 1898. According to the Deseret News, he was tendered a hearty welcome on his first visit to Brigham City after becoming president of the Church. I'm sure that the Rasmus Julius Smith family were in attendance at the welcoming-home.
1900 – The beginning of a new year and a new century, January 6, 1900, William Waldamer Smith was born at Brigham City. It was a Saturday and there was a general priesthood meeting held in Brigham City. One wonders if Rasmus Julius was in attendance, and he probably was, if that son was born in the wee hours of the morning.
Later that month, on January 14, there was a special YMMIA conference held in Brigham City and it was attended by President Joseph F. Smith, Apostle Rudger Clawson and Elder Thomas Hill. Nephi Anderson was sustained as president of the YMMIA.
The 9th of March, 1907, there was a stake conference held in Brigham city and President Joseph F. Smith was present.
The president of the stake, Lucuis A. Snow, reported the conditions of the stake, commenting, "There was some decrease in tithing because of heavy rains in the late summer."
In the morning meeting President Smith spoke on baptism and the necessity of it. He also spoke on prayer and forgiveness. In the afternoon meeting President Smith commented, "Things of God are not discernible by the spirit of man, but by the spirit of God." Then he concluded, "The worse of all punishments will come to men who are cut off this Church because they will come to a complete stop in the march forward towards eternal life."
I feel that Julius and his family heard this stirring sermon.
1910 – The 26th of September, 1910, Rasmus Julius received the first group of research information on his mother's line from Denmark. Lars J. Halling of Mantua prepared the records for temple work.
The 14th of November, 1910, Rasmus Julius and Josefina went to work at the Logan Temple. One of the things that they did was to seal his first wife, Anna Anthony, to him. That was dated the 16th of November, 1910.
Rasmus Julius lived close to the Lord and sometimes he shared deep spiritual experiences with his family. The following four experiences were shared by family members.
Once while in Logan his health was feeble and so Josefina and Julius got a room close to the Temple. After doing baptisms on day he was feeble and ill, and after going to bed, he could not sleep, but lay awake wondering how he would be able to complete the work. He prayed to God to open a way. Suddenly President Lorenzo Snow appeared and had with him George Q. Cannon as a witness. Brother Snow placed his hands on Julius Smith's head and blessed him. Day by day he grew better and stronger and became well.
Another time Andreas Beckman appeared to him and asked him to do his temple work. One evening as he sat eating his supper in his room at Logan, he had the door open as it was hot. As he looked up he saw a man standing in the door. He said he was Andreas Beckman (Josefina'a father) and he gave the necessary information and asked him to do his temple work.
Ernest Raphael Cheadle (Julius' son-in-law) also appeared to him and had him do his work for him. Julius' daughters, Amelia and Josephine, appeared to him soon after their deaths and his wife did the work for them.
Rasmus Julius had prayed for some time about the data on one of his ancestors. A person came to the door of his home, identified himself as Nathaniel, the ancient apostle, and gave Julius the information he desired. He wrote the information down, and Nathaniel left. Rasmus Julius walked to the door again, but no one was in sight.
1911 – January 9, 1911, Rasmus Julius corresponded with Cousin Marie and commented, "I am happy with my children, the four oldest girls are married and are well off, and the oldest son is also married. I have a daughter who has been a school teacher for two years and I have two going to high school. The three youngest are also going to school. I am now getting older and I am not as well as when I was young. I am going into my 67th year. My oldest son is living 200 miles from here and he has about 100 acres of land. Last year he harvested 15,000 bushesl of wheat besides other things to support him."
On the 20th of December, 1911, Rasmus Julius was sealed to Maren Kierstine Jorgensen, who was deceased. She was from Denmark and had been separated from her husband in life. Rasmus Julius had received her name and the information on her with some of his research information from Denmark on his mother's line.
1919 – On March 6, 1919, Berdina Anthony Smith, child of Rasmus Julius and Anna Anthony, was sealed to her mother and Rasmus Julius at the Logan temple. Both mother and daughter were deceased.
On the 25th of March, 1919, Rasmus Julius had his mother's baptism re-done under her correct birth date. Some church and family records listed Julian's birth as December 31, 1815. Apparently Julius found the correct date to be January 3, 1815 and so re-did his mother's work. (This date was also verified by the Danish letters received in 1957.)
On the 22nd of May, 1919, Rasmus Julius was sealed to Elizabeth Biglimsey of Montana who was deceased. This was evidently a woman he had known while he had been in Montana.
On May 28, 1919, Rasmus Julius had his mother's endowment work done.
1921 – On August 7th, Rasmus Julius and Josefina celebrated their Golden Wedding Anniversary. The Golden Wedding was celebrated by family members and close friends of Rasmus Julius and Josefina. A lovely chicken dinner was enjoyed by all. Josefina looked especially lovely in a black dress with a white print that had been made for her by Victor's wife Maggie. Experiences were exchanged and the day was enjoyed by all. Two comfortable chairs were presented them by the family.
William describes his parent's physical appearance in the following way:
"Dad was about 5ft., 125 pounds, blue eyes and very dark hair. Mother had blue eyes, black hair pulled straight back, and was about the same height as Dad."
William further describes his parents: "Father and Mother were both very active in the Church. I remember that where the Scout House is today, the chapel was located years ago. There they would go to meetings. I remember when I was ordained a deacon my father took me there when I was twelve years old to be ordained. Father was very active. He always went to priesthood meeting and Fast day meetings and all those things. He took an active part."
William describes the old family home: "Dad bought a house in the early 1870's. They just had two rooms. As time went along they moved the framework of a big hay barn – just the lower part that was made square poles – behind the house and used that for the framework for more room and then later built onto that. The original front two rooms were adobe.
"As the years went along they added to it, and then as the family grew and they needed more room they built the upstairs and finished two rooms there."
"It wasn't until they both passed away that I tore off the back part of the house and remodeled and added the bathroom and basement to it. There was no basement in the old home. We added the basement about 1930, and then after we put the basement in we added a furnace to it."
William describes their home life:
"Dad read a lot. He used to read Church books and those telling the lives of the different Church leaders. For a while, when he was in his 50's and early 60's, you would always see him with his glasses on when he read. But when he died, and in fact from about age 75 until the time he died, he could read the finest print without glasses. He never used the glasses. That was quite unusual, I thought, to get second eyesight again.
"In the evenings Father would sit in the big rocking chair or maybe at the table. On one side of the table the girls (and of course there were several girls, four of five of them) would be there studying. I was just a little fellow about four years old. I would crawl in around the table and over the chairs. I remember that well. And I remember how once in a while maybe I used to make a little noise or something and how I'd get scolded by Lil and Millicent. They would really scold me sometimes, and thrash me pretty good.
"I was quite a torment when I was a kid and I guess I deserved what few thrasin's I got from my sisters. My parents never laid a hand on me. They would speak when I was out of order. I respected them and obeyed, feeling badly about my misbehavior.
"Mother was a good cook and one thing, with a large family we didn't have much money, but Dad always provided a good table, and good substantial things. He'd always put in his flour for the winter. He always had cows and we had plenty of milk and butter, potatoes, and things like that. Mother would can an awful lot of fruit. They put down salt port and made lots of cheese. For those days I think we really lived well.
"I remember too, when I was just a youngster, about four, Mother had her loom set up in the living room, and there she would weave. Lots of time she would weave a carpet at night. She had quite a business. The people, as a rule, would bring their own rags all sewed up in balls and she would furnish the yarn, the warp they called it. As I remember, she would only get 15 or 20 cents a yard for weaving it, and she'd do well sometimes if she could weave two or three yards a day.
"But I remember during the time that we had a lot of strawberries just back of the house, about an acre or more, that's where Father used to make a living, on those; selling the berries in the spring. One year we had a big hailstorm about the time the berries were getting ripe, or in bloom and ripening, and it took the entire crop. It took all the leaves and everything right off the berries. Well, we were broke. So Mother went ahead then and put up her loom again.
"She had taken it down and more or less quit weaving for a while. But Mother went ahead and put the loom back up in the dining room. It was a large dining room and she put it up in one corner and there she would go ahead and weave and try and get more business so they could pay their taxes and buy the groceries, the things they had to have.
"I remember most of the time they used to churn their own butter, and many the time I would take this butter up town. We had a large basket and Mother would put maybe six or eight or ten pounds of butter in there that she had just made. They always had a flock of chickens and I'd either be taking butter or eggs up to the store every day or two. I'd carry them up to John Forrest. He had a store where Merrill Lumber Company is located now. It wasn't too large a store, but they had everything there that you wanted. I would take the eggs or butter and exchange them for certain groceries and things that we needed. He had yardage too, so we could buy cloth. Mother could do a lot of sewing when she had time.
"I remember so well when I'd bring in those pounds of butter, Mr. Forrest would say, ‘Well, I'll have to weigh those.' And then he'd say, ‘There's more than a pound of butter in each one of these.' And as a rule, by the time he got through weighing them there would be an extra pound of butter. If I had six or seven pounds, why there would always be an extra pound that he'd pay me for.
"I remember too, when we raised strawberries. Many times people would come to the house and buy berries. The berries would be sold for so much a cup, maybe 10 or 15 cents a cup. I remember how those cups used to be filled up and then we'd throw an extra cup or two in the bucket to be sure they had all that was coming to them. My parents never skimped, they always tried to give everything they should or a little bit more.
"I remember well when electricity was put in the house. I was just a youngster. I don't remember now just how old I was, but I believe I was about seven when they put electricity in the house. Before that we always had candles or lamps around the home. But when that day came, we were all happy. We just couldn't wait. They'd come in and put just one drop cord in the center of each room. And we'd have to turn it on right at the drop. We didn't have switches in the walls or anything that way, but we'd slip up and turn the button.
"And I also remember when they put the water in, the piped water down in front of the home there. I remember the man that was out digging the trench. I used to go out and talk to him. He told me that they were getting $1.25 a rod for digging and covering it up. And usually in the morning when he started he would step off the distance so that he would have at least two rods a day so he could make $2.50 a day. And then he would still have to cover it up. But if he worked quite good he could dig the trench four feet deep and about 33 to 40 feet long. Then after the whole block was dug, the city would come along and lay the pipe. And then he would come along and, as a rule he would throw it in by hand.
"In later years they used to have a team with a scraper and that way they could fill the trench up by backing up now and then you see, and pulling it in. But I remember well when they put it in front there, why he shoveled it all in by hand again. So you see they didn't make very much money."
Julius had a great love for the Indians. Once he lived with the Indians for a while. They called him Bogus Brig. Bogus means true or genuine in the Indian language. Brig stood for Brigham.
Once they were having a big celebration and they were dancing. He was dancing toward his partner, back and forth. It finally dawned on him that they were marrying him to an Indian girl, so when he danced away from her, he danced as far back as he could and then he started to run as fast as he could. They ran after him, but he got away from them and never went back. However, he always retained his great love for the Indians. He could dance, and could talk their language. He was very friendly with them when they came begging. If there was any ripe fruit on the trees he would let them help themselves to it.
In March of 1975 a Mr. Amos Gerber came to Brigham City to locate a Smith family whose father loved the Indians. As a boy of nine he had an experience with Rasmus Julius Smith that he wanted to share with his family. He desired the full name of Brother Smith and the name of the Indian involved. The following story is quoted from a letter from Brother Gerber:
"My father was the custodian of the Logan Tabernacle at the time as I remember, one December day in 1919 my father brought Brother Smith to our home (across the street north of the Logan Tabernacle) which is now town down, and said, "Brother Smith is quite old, (75 years) and doesn't have much money. Can we take care of him for a few days so that he can go to the temple?" My mother said yes and he was assigned to sleep with me. That night as soon as he hit the bed he was asleep and snoring, and he could do a good job of it, as I could hardly go to sleep. The next night he told me this story:
‘When I was a young man living in Brigham City I got a job as a pony express rider on the route between Ogden, Utah and Pocatello, Idaho. My route was between Brigham City and Malad, Idaho. One day as I was riding along the mountains east of where the Indian village of Washakie is my pony stepped into a badger hole and broke its leg. I had no choice but to shoot my pony and took my saddle on my shoulder, plus my blanket, mail pouch and bridle, and started to walk to Washakie to see if I could get a horse so that I could complete my delivery of the mail. As I neared the Indian village the dogs saw me and started out after me. The lead dog was a monster and I knew if they got to me they would rip me to pieces. (I guess I looked like something strange with a saddle, etc. on my back.) I had no choice but to shoot the lead dog. When I had done this the other dogs all went back. When the owner of the monster dog saw that I had killed his dog he became very angry, as did most the other Indians. However, there was a young Indian about my age that interceded in my behalf and after quite a bit of haggling they made a deal. (I could not understand what was said.) This young Indian came to me and in broken English said that the owner wanted my saddle, bridle, and gun for the dog I had killed.
‘I had no choice though the price was excessive. I thanked the young Indian and asked if I could borrow an old horse and get my mail through, and he got me one. I said I was sorry I had to shoot the dog and he said he would have done the same thing if it had been him.'
"There developed a love and friendship between Julius and this Indian and often this young Indian would be up at the trail to greet him and visit for a moment or two.
"When the pony express was to be discontinued he told his Indian friend that if he ever came to Brigham City that he should come to his home and visit with him. This he promised to do.
"The first time he came he scared the family as he went around the house and looked in every window to see if he could Julius.If he saw him then he would go and knock on the door.
"He always did this, and as the years passed they saw less of each other because of their age.
"About a week before Brother Smith came to our home he said he was reading the paper at night and he heard a noise at the window and thought maybe the wind was blowing, but as he looked at the window he saw the face of this Indian and his countenance was sad, and he went out to see what was the matter. There was a skiff of snow on the ground but no tracks. This bothered Brother Smith and the next day he went into town and inquired of some of the Indians as to the status of his friend. They said he had just died. He asked if his temple work had ever been done and they said no.
"Then Brother Smith told me, ‘Today I have taken care of his work in the temple.'
"Some months later Brother Smith came to Logan to again go to the temple and he told my father and I that when he got back to his home in Brigham city and was looking through his mail that evening, tat again he heard that sound at the window and when he looked at the window he saw his friend the Indian and there was a glow of happiness upon his countenance and he knew that he had done the right thing and he was ever so grateful to have had the privilege of doing his work for him.
"This experience of your grandfather has stayed with me over the years and I wanted my sons and grandsons to have it to strengthen their testimonies as it has mine." (Amos K. Gerber, Clinton, Utah – July 16, 1975.)
On page #100 of Rasmus Julius Smith's temple record book midway on the page it reads: "Be-a-go-pia fd. br. Abt. 1834 of Ross Fork, Ida. Dead bap. 6 Nov. 1917, endowed 28 Nov. 1923." This is the Indian Brother Berber's story refers to. Amos Gerber had looked up all the R. J. Smith's temple records on file in the Genealogical Society. He said this was the name Rasmus Julius had said the day he related the story to young Amos. Julius had stayed in his parents' home the day he did the temple work for Be-a-go-pla and had slept several nights with Amos.
The Smith house was unpretentious but adequate. The home of Rasmus and Josefina was a warm, friendly home and it welcomed kin and strangers. There yard was always beautiful with flowers and growing things.
Just east of them, across the street, lived Josefina's mother who had married Sven N. Lindahl in about 1873. They had a beautiful yard a half city block in size that was entirely encompassed with lilacs, fragrant honeysuckle and trumpet vines and wisteria. It was on this property that the thatched house was located, and the first peonies were cultivated in Brigham City. It was here that Grandma Lindahl always had a hidden dried apple in the winter for the grandchildren, or a great big sugar cookie. Aunt Millie tells of the times that she would go over to visit and how she loved to jump on their feather beads. Florence, daughter of Sylvia, lived with the grandparents for a time and Florence often commented how she did love Grandma. The children reported that sometimes their parents would talk Danish or Swedish, bits of each, to each other. They both spoke English very well, but if there were things they didn't want the children to know they would speak their native tongue.
On February 10, 1928, Rasmus Julius' wife, Josefina Bernhardina Beckman, died in Brigham City. This was a hard parting. They had lived in the same home all these years, and they were in their 57th year of married life. All those years she had been right at his side doing that which was necessary in the rearing of a large family.
It was Josefina who had taken care of the cows, the milking, making the butter, and selling the butter for a few household items such as salt and sugar and other things that they did not produce or raise on their property.
Josefina was always generous, and it was commented by Millicent that during all those early years when she had sold butter, she had always put an extra slab on the bottom so that it had good measure and she had always been paid just for one pound, but it had been well over a pound. In later years the storekeeper measured accurately and paid in full.
The closing years of Rasmus Julius' life were active but lonely. Son William recorded on December 27, 1966 some choice memories of his father that we are including.
"When Nellie and I were married in 1926 Mother and Father were still alive, but a short time afterwards Mother died. We were living in the small home across the road so that we could look after the folks because they were getting old. Father lived about a year and a half after Mother passed away. I often think how lonely he got. We tried to take her place, as much as we could, but many a times I went into his room and found Dad crying. He was just so lonesome that he just felt he would like to go too. As I remember, he died on the 7th of August, and if he had lived until the 2oth he would have been 86 years old.
"He had good health up until the last. He got around well. The last year or so he used a cane. He'd walk up town, six blocks, almost every day or every few days.
"He used to cut a lot of wood. In those days we used to burn wood, along with the coal. We had quite an apple orchard on the old homestead, and as we cut those trees down, Dad would spend days and weeks chopping wood. You would usually see him out at the wood pile either chopping or sawing wood. He kept in pretty good trim that way."
The last day of his father's life is recorded by William as follows:
"I had been away peddling fruit when he became ill. I was gone for two or three days into Wyoming country, and when I got back that morning I had a load of calves I had bought and was going to take into Ogden to sell at the packing house.
"When I pulled into the yard about six o'clock in the morning the first thing I did was run in the house and check with my wife and then I went in to see Dad. Dad had his own room. I started to talk to Dad and he said, ‘Are you here to stay for a few days?' And I said, ‘Well, Dad, I've got a load of cattle on now. I'm going to take them into Ogden and then I was going back because I have another load bought. What did you have in mind?'
"He said, ‘Well, I just haven't been feeling good. Last night Mother came to get me and I pleaded with her so that I could stay and talk to you once more. I'm sure glad to see you now.'
"I said, ‘Dad, I'll run down with these cattle and then I'll be right back. And I'll stay with you.'
"So I went down to Ogden and unloaded the cattle and came back, and I went in and visited with him and called the doctor. (He hadn't called the doctor. He didn't seem to want to, He said he was just tired and weak.) But anyhow, I called Dr. Pearse, the old family doctor. He came down and examined him and said as I walked out with him, ‘Bill,' he said, ‘Your Father could go anytime. He's very weak and I don't think he'll last too long.' Dad had been visiting with me and I knew he was weak, but I didn't think he was that far gone.
"I stayed with him all afternoon. (In the north east bedroom which was the north end of the present living room, the bed was on the west end of the room with Julius facing east.) That evening he said, ‘Will you stay with me tonight?' And I said, ‘Yes, Dad, I'll sit right by the side of the bed.' So I sat there at the side of the bed in the rocking chair. He was laying on his back and he put his one hand out to me and I held his hand there. He talked to me and he gave me a lot of good advice.
"He said, ‘I did want so much to talk to you and tell you a few things. The first thing I want to tell you is that the Gospel of Jesus Christ is true. I know it as I live.' And he said, ‘I'd like you to be more active in the Church. Go, take part, learn what you can about it, and be faithful in the Church. Pay an honest tithing. I always have and I feel I have been blessed for paying an honest tithe.'
"He told me several of his experiences he had in life. And it went on until about, oh, along about midnight or one o'clock in the morning and then he began to get quiet. He didn't talk very much.
"Then, along about four o'clock in the morning, I had my hand holding to his, when he took his hand from my hand and reached both hands up in the air and he said, ‘Mother is here to get me. Can you see her?' I said, ‘No, Dad, I can't see anything.' He said, ‘She's here, at the foot of the bed. She's come to get me. She was here last night but I begged that I might see and visit with you once more.'
What a beautiful reunion he must have had with Josefina and his other family members.
Josefina and Rasmus Julius were a great team that constantly pulled together. We can learn much from their lives of honest toil, obedience, and spirituality.
Josefina and Rasmus Julius were two who J. Rueben Clark speaks of "as great souls, majestic in the simplicity of their faith and in their living testimony of the truth of the restored gospel… To those souls name unknown, unremembered, unhonored in the pages of history, but lovingly revered round the hearthstones of their children and their children's children who pass down from generation to generation the story of their faith and their mighty works, and the righteousness of their lives and living, those souls who worked and worked, and prayed and followed, and wrought so gloriously."
REFERENCES:
Chronological data documented by Linda Larson, family research, memories of William W. Smith recorded at New England Mission Home on December 27, 1966, cassette tape recording of Smith Family Members in Glenn Smith's possession (July 7, 1971, July 1972, July 1, 1974)
Rasmus Julius Smith Patriarchal Blessing #1016 pg. 699
Life Story by Lillian Smith King
Living testimonies by Millicent and William dating from 1935 to 1975.
Journal History Oct. 2, 1854.
Through the Years- by 8th Ward Brigham City, Utah 1953.
Box Elder Lore- Box Elder Sons of Utah Pioneers.
History of Box Elder County- 1851-1937.
Compiled October 1975.
Necessary Explanations
1. Rasmus Julius Smith was also known as Julius and Erastus Julius.
2. Rasmus Julius Smith came to Utah with his mother in 1854. Before coming to Utah he went by the name of Rasmus Julius Sørensen.
3. With regard to Rasmus Julius' mother, Juliane Sørensdatter or Sørensen, all L.D.S. church and family records list her birth date as 31 December 1815. However, it has now been proven beyond any doubt that her correct birth date is 3 January 1815. There are several factors which prove this to be the case. The most important proof of this is contained in several letters from Rasmus Julius, and one letter form Juliane herself, to Julian's sister, Caroline and her children in Denmark. In these letters Rasmus Julius mentions an Uncle Frederich; and also talks about his step grandfather Bertel Larsen, who he says "was very good to me." The parish registers at Nørre Sundby, Aalbor, Denmark do show that Juliane Sorensdatter, born 3 January 1815, did have a sister Caroline and a brother Frederich. Also, Julian's mother, Maria Catherine Andersdatter Grȕshauge, did marry a person by the name of Bertel Larsen in 1826. Other proof includes the following: Juliane Sørensdatter, born 3 January 185, moved in 1842 to Serridslev parish in Hjørring county; and this is where the father, Rasmus Smith, was found listed on the 1840 and 1845 Census records. Also, Rasmus Julius did have his mother's baptism redone on 25 March 1919, and he listed 3 January 1815 as her birth date; which shows that he accepted this date, because of his personal knowledge of his mother's family.
4. Other research data and documentation are in the possession of Lynn Davis Larson, great grandson to Rasmus Julius Smith.
Sources of Information:
1. Vraa Parish, Hjørring, Denmark Births 1838-1866, pgs. 19 and 20. G.S. micro. #9054, pt. 5.
2. Hjørring County Military Levying Rolls for Emb Parish #45. 1843 Supplement. G.S. micro #8523, pt. 380.
3. Serridslev, Hjørring Moving In Records, 1842, pg. 193. G.S. micro. #9037, pt. 1.
4. Serridslev, Hjørring Moving Out Records, 1843. G.S. micro. #9037, pt. 1.
5. Hjørring City, Hjørring County Military Levying Rolls. 1846 Supplement for Hjørring City #84. G.S. micro. #8523, pt. 385.
6. Ørum, Hjørring, 1845 Census (Dronninglund H.) G.S. micro. #8513, pt. 27.
7. Aalborg City, Aalborg 1850 Census, pg. 85. G.S. micro. #8515, pt. 13.
8. Aalborg, Denmark Branch Records, 1850-1948 memberships, pg. 10. G.S. micro. #419317.
9. Aalborg, Denmark Branch Records, Emigration Lists, 1853. G.S. micro. #41937.
10. Information received from the Church Historian's office concerning the ship "Benjamin Adams" and the trip to Zion for those who came on this ship.
11. Information given in the Life Sketch of Rasmus Julius Smith, which was complied by Donna Edith Smith Packer, granddaughter to Rasmus Julius.
12. Brigham City Ward Records, 1854-1873. G.S. micro #6210, pt. 9.
13. Logan Temple Records. Endowments for the Dead, Book E-2, pg. 419.
14. Endowment House Temple Records, Living Sealings, Book A, pg. 31.
15. European Emigration Card Index, 1849-1925. G.S. micro. #298438.
16. 1870 U.S. Census, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, pg. 5. B.Y.U. micro #553109.
17. Endowment House Temple Records, Living Sealings 1871. Book G, pg. 350. Living Endowments, Book G, pg. 267.
18. Book of Births and Other Vital Information which was kept by Rasmus Julius Smith.



  • Maintained by: htigerlily89
  • Originally Created by: Sherma Nelson
  • Added: 11 Jan 2010
  • Find A Grave Memorial 46559693
  • htigerlily89
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Rasmus Julius Smith (20 Aug 1843–7 Aug 1929), Find A Grave Memorial no. 46559693, citing Brigham City Cemetery, Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah, USA ; Maintained by htigerlily89 (contributor 47576048) .