Advertisement

John Gibbons

Advertisement

John Gibbons

Birth
County Donegal, Ireland
Death
11 Feb 1917 (aged 68)
Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA
Burial
Evanston, Cook County, Illinois, USA Add to Map
Plot
Section 10, Block 1, Lot S of N55
Memorial ID
View Source
Judge John Gibbons, for twenty-four years an occupant of the Circuit bench in Chicago, died at the Presbyterian hospital yesterday. His death was caused by pneumonia, following an operation for an aneurism of the aorta which had been superinduced by arteriosclerosis. He had been under the care of Drs. Arthur Dean Bevan and Bertram W. Sippy.

The jurist passed away at 6:30 o'clock in the morning. Mrs. Elizabeth Gibbons, his wife, and Charles and Patrick Gibbons, nephews, and their wives were at his bedside. He was unconscious for hours before his death.

The funeral will be held at 10 o'clock Wednesday morning from the residence, 1417 North Dearborn street. Services will be held at the Church of the Immaculate Conception. The interment will be in Calvary.

Born in Ireland .

Judge Gibbons was born March 28, 1848, in Fannach, Donegal, Ireland , and came to this country when 16 years old, settling in Philadelphia. He attended the Broad Street academy there and then graduated from Notre Dame university. For two years after leaving the university he attended a night law school in Philadelphia, and was admitted to the bar in Keokuk, Ia., in 1870. For five years he was city attorney of Keokuk, and was elected to the Iowa legislature in 1875.

While city attorney he caused the Supreme court of the United States to recall two of its prior decisions and to establish the principle that a municipality had the power to collect wharfage based on the tonnage of the vessel, and other mooted points. His influence in bringing about these decisions gave him a national reputation.

Came Here in 1879.

He came to Chicago in 1879 and practiced law until 1893. Armand F. Teefy, formerly assistant corporation counsel, and Judge Marcus Kavanagh, were members of his firm. During this period he edited the Chicago Law Journal and the American Criminal Reports and wrote "Tenure and Toil; or the Rights and Wrongs of Property and Labor," a volume that established him as a friend of the working classes. It was responsible for the Pullman quo warranto case being taken from his court on change of venue on the ground that the book was prima facie evidence that the jurist was prejudiced in favor of the laboring man. He was elected to the Circuit bench in 1893 and served continuously till his death.

As judge he rendered a number of important decisions.

When the state's attorney and Chicago officials abandoned hope of closing the Harlem racetrack, where gambling was rife, Judge Gibbons held that a corporation is the creature of the state, subject to state regulation, and revoked the charter of the racecourse. All these decisions were upheld by the higher courts.

Gas Case Decision.

His decision in the gas case in 1911 was his most notable in recent years. The city passed an ordinance fixing the

---------------

John Gibbons Born March 28, 1848. Died Feb. 11, 1917.

---------------

rates for gas supplied by the People's Gas Light and Coke company at 75 cents a 1,000 cubic feet for 1911-'12; 70 cents for 1913-'14, and 68 cents for 1915-'16. Judge Gibbons issued a temporary injunction restraining the enforcement of the ordinance and reducing the rate for gas from 85 to 80 cents, which is the prevailing rate today.

At the beginning of his administration Mayor Thompson appointed Attorney Donald R. Richberg to start action to establish the validity of the gas ordinance. Mr. Richberg made a fight to take the case away from Judge Gibbons, with the result that the executive committee of the Circuit court judges transferred the case to the jurisdiction of Judge Frederick A. Smith, where it is now being pushed. In its contention that the ordinance has been in legal effect since its passage the city is seeking to obtain a refund of $10,000,000, which it holds the citizens have been forced illegally to pay by the rate fixed by Judge Gibbons.

Favored Many Reforms.

Judge Gibbons favored national uniform divorce laws, the death penalty for assaults on women, and profit sharing by corporations and employes to end strikes. He went on record in a decision as opposing high school fraternities and all secret societies as enemies of the law and state.

Judge Gibbons was one of the organizers and the first president of the Notre Dame Alumni association. He was a Roman Catholic, member of the Holy Angels parish, and president of the St. Patrick society. He had been a lecturer on constitutional law in the Chicago College of Law and a member of the Hamilton club from its early days.

He had been one of the owners of the Chicago Law Journal since 1888. He owned mining interests in Colorado, and in that state he usually spent his summers.

He was married to Mrs. R. B. Fuller in 1892.

Among his distinguished kinsmen were Mgr. John Gibbons of Rome, Archbishop McGettigan of Armagh, and Cardinal Logue of Armagh.

Lived at 3541 Grand Boulevard, Chicago."Illinois, Archdiocese of Chicago, Cemetery Records, 1864-1989"
Judge John Gibbons, for twenty-four years an occupant of the Circuit bench in Chicago, died at the Presbyterian hospital yesterday. His death was caused by pneumonia, following an operation for an aneurism of the aorta which had been superinduced by arteriosclerosis. He had been under the care of Drs. Arthur Dean Bevan and Bertram W. Sippy.

The jurist passed away at 6:30 o'clock in the morning. Mrs. Elizabeth Gibbons, his wife, and Charles and Patrick Gibbons, nephews, and their wives were at his bedside. He was unconscious for hours before his death.

The funeral will be held at 10 o'clock Wednesday morning from the residence, 1417 North Dearborn street. Services will be held at the Church of the Immaculate Conception. The interment will be in Calvary.

Born in Ireland .

Judge Gibbons was born March 28, 1848, in Fannach, Donegal, Ireland , and came to this country when 16 years old, settling in Philadelphia. He attended the Broad Street academy there and then graduated from Notre Dame university. For two years after leaving the university he attended a night law school in Philadelphia, and was admitted to the bar in Keokuk, Ia., in 1870. For five years he was city attorney of Keokuk, and was elected to the Iowa legislature in 1875.

While city attorney he caused the Supreme court of the United States to recall two of its prior decisions and to establish the principle that a municipality had the power to collect wharfage based on the tonnage of the vessel, and other mooted points. His influence in bringing about these decisions gave him a national reputation.

Came Here in 1879.

He came to Chicago in 1879 and practiced law until 1893. Armand F. Teefy, formerly assistant corporation counsel, and Judge Marcus Kavanagh, were members of his firm. During this period he edited the Chicago Law Journal and the American Criminal Reports and wrote "Tenure and Toil; or the Rights and Wrongs of Property and Labor," a volume that established him as a friend of the working classes. It was responsible for the Pullman quo warranto case being taken from his court on change of venue on the ground that the book was prima facie evidence that the jurist was prejudiced in favor of the laboring man. He was elected to the Circuit bench in 1893 and served continuously till his death.

As judge he rendered a number of important decisions.

When the state's attorney and Chicago officials abandoned hope of closing the Harlem racetrack, where gambling was rife, Judge Gibbons held that a corporation is the creature of the state, subject to state regulation, and revoked the charter of the racecourse. All these decisions were upheld by the higher courts.

Gas Case Decision.

His decision in the gas case in 1911 was his most notable in recent years. The city passed an ordinance fixing the

---------------

John Gibbons Born March 28, 1848. Died Feb. 11, 1917.

---------------

rates for gas supplied by the People's Gas Light and Coke company at 75 cents a 1,000 cubic feet for 1911-'12; 70 cents for 1913-'14, and 68 cents for 1915-'16. Judge Gibbons issued a temporary injunction restraining the enforcement of the ordinance and reducing the rate for gas from 85 to 80 cents, which is the prevailing rate today.

At the beginning of his administration Mayor Thompson appointed Attorney Donald R. Richberg to start action to establish the validity of the gas ordinance. Mr. Richberg made a fight to take the case away from Judge Gibbons, with the result that the executive committee of the Circuit court judges transferred the case to the jurisdiction of Judge Frederick A. Smith, where it is now being pushed. In its contention that the ordinance has been in legal effect since its passage the city is seeking to obtain a refund of $10,000,000, which it holds the citizens have been forced illegally to pay by the rate fixed by Judge Gibbons.

Favored Many Reforms.

Judge Gibbons favored national uniform divorce laws, the death penalty for assaults on women, and profit sharing by corporations and employes to end strikes. He went on record in a decision as opposing high school fraternities and all secret societies as enemies of the law and state.

Judge Gibbons was one of the organizers and the first president of the Notre Dame Alumni association. He was a Roman Catholic, member of the Holy Angels parish, and president of the St. Patrick society. He had been a lecturer on constitutional law in the Chicago College of Law and a member of the Hamilton club from its early days.

He had been one of the owners of the Chicago Law Journal since 1888. He owned mining interests in Colorado, and in that state he usually spent his summers.

He was married to Mrs. R. B. Fuller in 1892.

Among his distinguished kinsmen were Mgr. John Gibbons of Rome, Archbishop McGettigan of Armagh, and Cardinal Logue of Armagh.

Lived at 3541 Grand Boulevard, Chicago."Illinois, Archdiocese of Chicago, Cemetery Records, 1864-1989"


Sponsored by Ancestry

Advertisement