Advertisement

Capt George Gamaliel Howe

Advertisement

Capt George Gamaliel Howe

Birth
Plattsburgh, Clinton County, New York, USA
Death
14 Nov 1902 (aged 69)
Burlington, Chittenden County, Vermont, USA
Burial
Weybridge, Addison County, Vermont, USA
Memorial ID
46465947 View Source

George Gamaliel Howe was born Jan 30,1833 in Plattsburg,New York.His middle name was taken from his maternal Grandfather ,Gamaliel Kelsey, of Salisbury,Vermont.

George's father,Nehemiah Howe (1800-bef/1870),also known as "Libby" Howe,was the son of Salah Howe(1762-1840)and Elizabeth Spears (1773-1846).George's mother,Pasiphae Jane Kelsey(1808-1894)was the daughter of,Gamaliel Kelsey(1785-1844)and ,Elizabeth Murray Soper (1787-1880).George's mother and father were married in Salisbury,Vermont on April 29,1832.After their marriage Nehemiah and Pasiphae went to live first in Plattsburg,New York where their first son ,George Gamaliel and subject of this biograpy was born.They then moved to Avon,New York where the next three of their children were born (see below).By 1845 they were back in Vermont living first in Brandon,Vermont where,George attented school at the "Vermont Literary and Scientific Institution" ,in 1845 and 1846.While still living in Brandon George's sister,Elizabeth Augusta Howe was born on Aug 22,1847.Soon after her birth the family moved to Middlebury,Vermont.The Howe residence was on Court Street in Middlebury,Vermont.

Their five children in order of birth were as follows..

1- George Gamaliel Howe b Jan 30,1833 in Plattsburg,New York,d Nov 14,1902 in Weybridge,Vermont,served as a Captain during the Civil War,he was a "Harness Maker".

2- Gratia Burt Howe: b Dec 4, 1838,in Avon,N.Y.,d Mar 30,1909 in Middlebury,Vt,helped raise her brother George's only child,Edith.Gratia never marries.

3- Ansel Wallace Howe :b Oct 9,1840 in Avon,N.Y.He married, Alice Daulton on Nov 5,1874 in Lowell,Ma.Ansel was also was a "Harness Maker",d Feb 1,1888 in Hanover,New Hampshire.

4- Eugene Howe: b Aug 28,1843 in Avon,N.Y.,severely insured in the Civil War he moved to the Nations Capital where he worked before retiring to a disabled home for veterans in Hampton City,Virginia.He died Mar 1,1892 at the age of 48.

5- Elizabeth Augusta Howe b Aug 22,1847 in Brandon,Vt,d Dec 12,1901 in Newark,N.J,(buried in Brandon,Vt),she married Brandon,Vt native and Civil War veteran,William Harley Sanderson.

Long before Vermont was a state,George's family were early pioneers settlers of the Vermont frontier.On Oct 11,1745 his 3rd great Grandfather, Nehemiah Howe (1693-1747)was captured by Indian's on the Great meadow of Hinsdale,Vermont and taken to a French Canadian prison where he died.While in prison he recorded his ordeal,detailing his captivity,in a journal which was published in 1747 and titled "A Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How".George's paternal grand father,Private Salah Howe (1762-1841), was a patriot soldier in the Revolutionary War for New Hampshire.In 1776,at the age of 14,Salah joined Capt John Dennett's 2nd New Hampshire Battalion,commanded by Col.George Reid and served throughout the war.

At the on set of The Civil War,on Sep 1,1862 in Shoreham,Vt,George Gamaliel Howe enlisted as a First Sergeant and began his service in the First Heavy Artillery,Eleventh Vermont Volunteers.

The First Heavy Artillery,Eleventh Vermont Volunteers, was the largest Vermont regiment.Its aggregate membership,officers and men,was 2,320.It was originally recruited as an infantry regiment in the summer of 1862. Being assigned to duty in the Northern Defenses of Washington,it was soon changed from infantry to heavy artillery by order of the War Department,and its enlargement to the regular heavy artillery standard was authorized. Further recruiting followed,which resulted in giving it twelve companies (called batteries) of one hundred fifty men each,with three Majors, with four Lieutenants to each battery.The number of non-commissioned officers was also enlarged.

The service of the regiment at Washington embraced a period of a year and eight months, chiefly employed in constructing and garrisoning the three well-known fortifications named Fort Slocum, Fort Stevens, and Fort Totten. Four other forts were occupied by the regiment during the latter part of its Atillery service,giving it a front of about seven miles ,facing north, from East Creek to Rock Creek. These works mounted over two hundred heavy guns and mortars, and were connected by a continuous line of rifle pits. The line thus occupied was about four miles from the city, beyond the Soldiers' Home,and was afterwards ineffectually attacked by General Jubal Anderson Early.During its occupancy by the Eleventh Vermont the regiment became noted for its proficiency in drill and thorough discipline.It assumed the red chevrons and shoulder straps of the artillery arm,and added an artillery flag to its colors, crossed cannons on a yellow field. Its camps were well-built wooden structures, with a fine hospital.It was the daily resort of visitors from the city.No more pleasant or cheerful experiences were ever the lot of soldiers in actual war than those enjoyed by this regiment during the whole of the year 1863 and the first three months of 1864.

After the battle of the Wilderness,General Grant summoned all available troops to the re-enforcement of the Army of the Potomac,and this regiment with others was ordered to the front as infantry,though still bearing its yellow flag and wearing red trimmings upon its uniforms.It reported for duty near Spottsylvania Court House with 1,500 men in line,and at once became a member of the Old Vermont Brigade,whose five regiments had been reduced to scarce 1,200 muskets.In order to handle the Eleventh on the march and in battle it became necessary to divide it into three battalions, giving the Majors practically regimental commands. In this manner it fought to the end of the war in the Sixth Army Corps.Its active service was only eleven months.During this brief period I55 of its members were killed in action,or died of wounds received in action;175 died in Confederate prisons, and 457 were wounded.These figures demonstrate the severity of the duty it was called upon to perform, and in the performance of which it never flinched for an instant.Being placed by the side of the veteran regiments of the Vermont Brigade,the Eleventh was on its mettle from the outset,and soon added to its discipline the experience of actual campaigning necessary to make it the equal of any command in the army.The list of its engagements appended shows that it was in every battle fought by the Sixth Corps from May,1864, to April, 1865. The occasions most vividly remembered are, the heavy artillery fire to which it was subjected at Spottsylvania, May 18; the battle of Cold Harbor,-where it suffered heavily;the bitter episode on the Weldon road, where almost an entire battalion was captured by General William Mahone ;the return to Washington and the repulse of General Early's attack on Fort Stevens; the sharp engagement on the skirmish line at Charlestown on August 21; the battle of the Opequan, when ,General Philip Sherdan's sent the rebels "whirling through Winchester;" the capture of Fisher's Hill;the battle of Cedar Creek,with the soul-stirring incident of Sheridan's ride when he drew rein on Rienzi in front of the Vermont Brigade, and at once announced to its officers that he would fight the battle out on Getty's line;the winter siege of Petersburg,culminating in the charge of April 2,when the Sixth Corps went through the rebel entrenchments in the early morning twilight,capturing what has been called the strongest line of works in America in fifteen minutes, during which 1,100 men were killed or wounded;and the pursuit of Lee's flying army to Appomattox Court House, followed by the final march to Danville of one hundred miles in four days,where the Sixth Corps remained until the last rebel had laid down his arms.

The regiment was fortunate in its officers.Its Colonel from enlistment until after the fighting was over,was ,General James M Warner, of Middlebury,a West Point graduate,who had seen service on the plains in the regular army,a thorough soldier,and a universal favorite. He was shot through the neck in the regiment's first engagement at Spottsylvania ,rejoined his command when it entered the Shenandoah Valley,commanded the brigade at the battle of Opequan, and was assigned the next day to command the First Brigade of Getty,s Division,a detail of which continued until the close of the war, and in which he gained great credit, especially at Fisher's Hill,Cedar Creek, and the capture of Petersborg, being finally promoted to Brigadier-General of Volunteers,
and Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. A.

The first Lieutenant-Colonel was Rueben C.Benton,an experienced and capable officer,whose health broke down in the hard service of May,1864,compelling his resignation.He was succeeded by George Chamberlin,previously Senior Major,an exceedingly gallant gentleman,who was killed at Charlestown. Maj. Charles Hunsdon then became lieut colonel,commanding the regiment in the absence of General Warner most of the time thereafter,and finally promoted to the Colonelcy.,Maj. Alance F. Walker, then became the last lieutenant-colonel.He was in command of the regiment at the battle of the Opequan.Other majors were George Sowles,Robert Templeton and ,Darius Safford, the latter remaining in the service after the conclusion of the war as Lieutenant-Colonel in command of a battalion which was not mustered out until some time after the rest of the regiment. ,Maj.Charles Buxton, was killed at the Opequan before his commission reached him.Surgeon C. B.Park and Chaplain Arthur Little deserve a special line of generous recognition.

Brevets for gallant and meritorious service were conferred upon Col. James M. Warner,Maj. Alance F. Walker,Capt.James E. Eldredge, Lieut.Henry Baxter,Capt George G Tilden, Lieutenants Henry J. Nichols,George A. Bailey,John Macomber,and Charles H. Anson. Several officers succeeded in making their escape from rebel prison pens to the Union lines.One ,Lieut.Edward Bates Parker, while endeavoring to escape,was seriously bitten by blood-hounds on his trail, and died of his injuries a few days later.

The Vermont First Heavy Artillery participated in the following Engagement's..

Spottsylvania, Va., May 15 to 18,1864.
Cold Harbor, Va., June 1 to 12, 1864.
Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864.
Weldon Railroad, Va., June 23, 1864.
Fort Stevens, Md., July 11, 1864.
Charlestown, W. Va., August 21, 1864.
Gilbert's Ford, Va., Sept. 13, 1864.
Opequan, Va., Sept. 19,1864.
Fisher's Hill, Va., Sept. 21 and 22, 1864.
Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19,1864.
Petersburg, Va., March 25 and 27, 1865,
Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865

During his service with Company B ,Vermont First Heavy Artillery,George Gamaliel Howe was promoted as follows: On December 28,1863 he was promoted to First Lieutenant.June 7,1864 he was promoted to Second Lieutenat.Transferring to Company "I",George was promoted to Captain on May 23,1865 to fill a vacancy left by the promotion of,Captain Robinson Tempelton.On June 24,1865,Captain George Gamaliel Howe musterd out of service.The following day George wrote home to his, soon to be wife,Lorette Wolcott: "We were mustered out yesterday.Start for Vermont tomorrow"

Once home a year later,Feb 20,1866, he married,Lorette Wolcott born Jan 1,1843 in Shoreham,Vt,she was the daughter of Levi Wolcott and Aimedia Sanford.Before the war,George Howe had become smitten with Lorette,while working as a Saddler in Shoreham.Lorette's family lived next door to where George boarded at Harriett Flowers residence.When George Howe joined the Union Army in 1861 he and Lorette Wolcott began a series of letters written back an forth over the entire length of his service.The letters started out in a friendly brother/sister type correspondence in 1861 and by 1864 had culminated into affectionate loving one.

With the letter's as inspiration,George and Lorette Howe's story was used for a play-write,by Joan Robinson,titled,"Remember me to all Good Folks".The play was staged at the,Town Hall Theater in Middlebury,Vt on September 9th & 10th,2011.The Henry Sheldon Museum in Middlebury Vermont has Lorette and George's letters and George's uniform in it's archives.In celebration of 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War,former Executive Director,Jan Albers of the Sheldon Museum came up with the idea of bringing,George and Lorette's Civil War error Love story to life on stage.

George and Lorette had one daughter, Edith Howe who was born Feb 9,1867.Sadly at the young age of 25 on Sep 19,1868, just a year after giving birth,,Lorette Howe becomes ill with typhoid fever and dies.George then moves with his one year old daughter to Middebury with his mother Pasiphae Jane Kelsey Howe who with George's sister,Gratia Burt Howe take care of George's daughter Edith Howe .George returns to his pre-war occupation as a "Saddler" and becomes a "Harnesss Maker", the profession he remains in the rest of his life.From a least 1880 George is living and working in Burlington,Vermont.George never re-married and dies a widower,on November 14,1902.His remains were taken to the "Weybridge Hill Cemetery",in Addison County,Vermont.

George Gamaliel Howe was born Jan 30,1833 in Plattsburg,New York.His middle name was taken from his maternal Grandfather ,Gamaliel Kelsey, of Salisbury,Vermont.

George's father,Nehemiah Howe (1800-bef/1870),also known as "Libby" Howe,was the son of Salah Howe(1762-1840)and Elizabeth Spears (1773-1846).George's mother,Pasiphae Jane Kelsey(1808-1894)was the daughter of,Gamaliel Kelsey(1785-1844)and ,Elizabeth Murray Soper (1787-1880).George's mother and father were married in Salisbury,Vermont on April 29,1832.After their marriage Nehemiah and Pasiphae went to live first in Plattsburg,New York where their first son ,George Gamaliel and subject of this biograpy was born.They then moved to Avon,New York where the next three of their children were born (see below).By 1845 they were back in Vermont living first in Brandon,Vermont where,George attented school at the "Vermont Literary and Scientific Institution" ,in 1845 and 1846.While still living in Brandon George's sister,Elizabeth Augusta Howe was born on Aug 22,1847.Soon after her birth the family moved to Middlebury,Vermont.The Howe residence was on Court Street in Middlebury,Vermont.

Their five children in order of birth were as follows..

1- George Gamaliel Howe b Jan 30,1833 in Plattsburg,New York,d Nov 14,1902 in Weybridge,Vermont,served as a Captain during the Civil War,he was a "Harness Maker".

2- Gratia Burt Howe: b Dec 4, 1838,in Avon,N.Y.,d Mar 30,1909 in Middlebury,Vt,helped raise her brother George's only child,Edith.Gratia never marries.

3- Ansel Wallace Howe :b Oct 9,1840 in Avon,N.Y.He married, Alice Daulton on Nov 5,1874 in Lowell,Ma.Ansel was also was a "Harness Maker",d Feb 1,1888 in Hanover,New Hampshire.

4- Eugene Howe: b Aug 28,1843 in Avon,N.Y.,severely insured in the Civil War he moved to the Nations Capital where he worked before retiring to a disabled home for veterans in Hampton City,Virginia.He died Mar 1,1892 at the age of 48.

5- Elizabeth Augusta Howe b Aug 22,1847 in Brandon,Vt,d Dec 12,1901 in Newark,N.J,(buried in Brandon,Vt),she married Brandon,Vt native and Civil War veteran,William Harley Sanderson.

Long before Vermont was a state,George's family were early pioneers settlers of the Vermont frontier.On Oct 11,1745 his 3rd great Grandfather, Nehemiah Howe (1693-1747)was captured by Indian's on the Great meadow of Hinsdale,Vermont and taken to a French Canadian prison where he died.While in prison he recorded his ordeal,detailing his captivity,in a journal which was published in 1747 and titled "A Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How".George's paternal grand father,Private Salah Howe (1762-1841), was a patriot soldier in the Revolutionary War for New Hampshire.In 1776,at the age of 14,Salah joined Capt John Dennett's 2nd New Hampshire Battalion,commanded by Col.George Reid and served throughout the war.

At the on set of The Civil War,on Sep 1,1862 in Shoreham,Vt,George Gamaliel Howe enlisted as a First Sergeant and began his service in the First Heavy Artillery,Eleventh Vermont Volunteers.

The First Heavy Artillery,Eleventh Vermont Volunteers, was the largest Vermont regiment.Its aggregate membership,officers and men,was 2,320.It was originally recruited as an infantry regiment in the summer of 1862. Being assigned to duty in the Northern Defenses of Washington,it was soon changed from infantry to heavy artillery by order of the War Department,and its enlargement to the regular heavy artillery standard was authorized. Further recruiting followed,which resulted in giving it twelve companies (called batteries) of one hundred fifty men each,with three Majors, with four Lieutenants to each battery.The number of non-commissioned officers was also enlarged.

The service of the regiment at Washington embraced a period of a year and eight months, chiefly employed in constructing and garrisoning the three well-known fortifications named Fort Slocum, Fort Stevens, and Fort Totten. Four other forts were occupied by the regiment during the latter part of its Atillery service,giving it a front of about seven miles ,facing north, from East Creek to Rock Creek. These works mounted over two hundred heavy guns and mortars, and were connected by a continuous line of rifle pits. The line thus occupied was about four miles from the city, beyond the Soldiers' Home,and was afterwards ineffectually attacked by General Jubal Anderson Early.During its occupancy by the Eleventh Vermont the regiment became noted for its proficiency in drill and thorough discipline.It assumed the red chevrons and shoulder straps of the artillery arm,and added an artillery flag to its colors, crossed cannons on a yellow field. Its camps were well-built wooden structures, with a fine hospital.It was the daily resort of visitors from the city.No more pleasant or cheerful experiences were ever the lot of soldiers in actual war than those enjoyed by this regiment during the whole of the year 1863 and the first three months of 1864.

After the battle of the Wilderness,General Grant summoned all available troops to the re-enforcement of the Army of the Potomac,and this regiment with others was ordered to the front as infantry,though still bearing its yellow flag and wearing red trimmings upon its uniforms.It reported for duty near Spottsylvania Court House with 1,500 men in line,and at once became a member of the Old Vermont Brigade,whose five regiments had been reduced to scarce 1,200 muskets.In order to handle the Eleventh on the march and in battle it became necessary to divide it into three battalions, giving the Majors practically regimental commands. In this manner it fought to the end of the war in the Sixth Army Corps.Its active service was only eleven months.During this brief period I55 of its members were killed in action,or died of wounds received in action;175 died in Confederate prisons, and 457 were wounded.These figures demonstrate the severity of the duty it was called upon to perform, and in the performance of which it never flinched for an instant.Being placed by the side of the veteran regiments of the Vermont Brigade,the Eleventh was on its mettle from the outset,and soon added to its discipline the experience of actual campaigning necessary to make it the equal of any command in the army.The list of its engagements appended shows that it was in every battle fought by the Sixth Corps from May,1864, to April, 1865. The occasions most vividly remembered are, the heavy artillery fire to which it was subjected at Spottsylvania, May 18; the battle of Cold Harbor,-where it suffered heavily;the bitter episode on the Weldon road, where almost an entire battalion was captured by General William Mahone ;the return to Washington and the repulse of General Early's attack on Fort Stevens; the sharp engagement on the skirmish line at Charlestown on August 21; the battle of the Opequan, when ,General Philip Sherdan's sent the rebels "whirling through Winchester;" the capture of Fisher's Hill;the battle of Cedar Creek,with the soul-stirring incident of Sheridan's ride when he drew rein on Rienzi in front of the Vermont Brigade, and at once announced to its officers that he would fight the battle out on Getty's line;the winter siege of Petersburg,culminating in the charge of April 2,when the Sixth Corps went through the rebel entrenchments in the early morning twilight,capturing what has been called the strongest line of works in America in fifteen minutes, during which 1,100 men were killed or wounded;and the pursuit of Lee's flying army to Appomattox Court House, followed by the final march to Danville of one hundred miles in four days,where the Sixth Corps remained until the last rebel had laid down his arms.

The regiment was fortunate in its officers.Its Colonel from enlistment until after the fighting was over,was ,General James M Warner, of Middlebury,a West Point graduate,who had seen service on the plains in the regular army,a thorough soldier,and a universal favorite. He was shot through the neck in the regiment's first engagement at Spottsylvania ,rejoined his command when it entered the Shenandoah Valley,commanded the brigade at the battle of Opequan, and was assigned the next day to command the First Brigade of Getty,s Division,a detail of which continued until the close of the war, and in which he gained great credit, especially at Fisher's Hill,Cedar Creek, and the capture of Petersborg, being finally promoted to Brigadier-General of Volunteers,
and Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. A.

The first Lieutenant-Colonel was Rueben C.Benton,an experienced and capable officer,whose health broke down in the hard service of May,1864,compelling his resignation.He was succeeded by George Chamberlin,previously Senior Major,an exceedingly gallant gentleman,who was killed at Charlestown. Maj. Charles Hunsdon then became lieut colonel,commanding the regiment in the absence of General Warner most of the time thereafter,and finally promoted to the Colonelcy.,Maj. Alance F. Walker, then became the last lieutenant-colonel.He was in command of the regiment at the battle of the Opequan.Other majors were George Sowles,Robert Templeton and ,Darius Safford, the latter remaining in the service after the conclusion of the war as Lieutenant-Colonel in command of a battalion which was not mustered out until some time after the rest of the regiment. ,Maj.Charles Buxton, was killed at the Opequan before his commission reached him.Surgeon C. B.Park and Chaplain Arthur Little deserve a special line of generous recognition.

Brevets for gallant and meritorious service were conferred upon Col. James M. Warner,Maj. Alance F. Walker,Capt.James E. Eldredge, Lieut.Henry Baxter,Capt George G Tilden, Lieutenants Henry J. Nichols,George A. Bailey,John Macomber,and Charles H. Anson. Several officers succeeded in making their escape from rebel prison pens to the Union lines.One ,Lieut.Edward Bates Parker, while endeavoring to escape,was seriously bitten by blood-hounds on his trail, and died of his injuries a few days later.

The Vermont First Heavy Artillery participated in the following Engagement's..

Spottsylvania, Va., May 15 to 18,1864.
Cold Harbor, Va., June 1 to 12, 1864.
Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864.
Weldon Railroad, Va., June 23, 1864.
Fort Stevens, Md., July 11, 1864.
Charlestown, W. Va., August 21, 1864.
Gilbert's Ford, Va., Sept. 13, 1864.
Opequan, Va., Sept. 19,1864.
Fisher's Hill, Va., Sept. 21 and 22, 1864.
Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19,1864.
Petersburg, Va., March 25 and 27, 1865,
Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865

During his service with Company B ,Vermont First Heavy Artillery,George Gamaliel Howe was promoted as follows: On December 28,1863 he was promoted to First Lieutenant.June 7,1864 he was promoted to Second Lieutenat.Transferring to Company "I",George was promoted to Captain on May 23,1865 to fill a vacancy left by the promotion of,Captain Robinson Tempelton.On June 24,1865,Captain George Gamaliel Howe musterd out of service.The following day George wrote home to his, soon to be wife,Lorette Wolcott: "We were mustered out yesterday.Start for Vermont tomorrow"

Once home a year later,Feb 20,1866, he married,Lorette Wolcott born Jan 1,1843 in Shoreham,Vt,she was the daughter of Levi Wolcott and Aimedia Sanford.Before the war,George Howe had become smitten with Lorette,while working as a Saddler in Shoreham.Lorette's family lived next door to where George boarded at Harriett Flowers residence.When George Howe joined the Union Army in 1861 he and Lorette Wolcott began a series of letters written back an forth over the entire length of his service.The letters started out in a friendly brother/sister type correspondence in 1861 and by 1864 had culminated into affectionate loving one.

With the letter's as inspiration,George and Lorette Howe's story was used for a play-write,by Joan Robinson,titled,"Remember me to all Good Folks".The play was staged at the,Town Hall Theater in Middlebury,Vt on September 9th & 10th,2011.The Henry Sheldon Museum in Middlebury Vermont has Lorette and George's letters and George's uniform in it's archives.In celebration of 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War,former Executive Director,Jan Albers of the Sheldon Museum came up with the idea of bringing,George and Lorette's Civil War error Love story to life on stage.

George and Lorette had one daughter, Edith Howe who was born Feb 9,1867.Sadly at the young age of 25 on Sep 19,1868, just a year after giving birth,,Lorette Howe becomes ill with typhoid fever and dies.George then moves with his one year old daughter to Middebury with his mother Pasiphae Jane Kelsey Howe who with George's sister,Gratia Burt Howe take care of George's daughter Edith Howe .George returns to his pre-war occupation as a "Saddler" and becomes a "Harnesss Maker", the profession he remains in the rest of his life.From a least 1880 George is living and working in Burlington,Vermont.George never re-married and dies a widower,on November 14,1902.His remains were taken to the "Weybridge Hill Cemetery",in Addison County,Vermont.


Family Members

Parents
Spouse
Children

Flowers

In their memory
Plant Memorial Trees

Sponsored by Ancestry

Advertisement