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 Julius Waties Waring

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Julius Waties Waring

Birth
Charleston, Charleston County, South Carolina, USA
Death
11 Jan 1968 (aged 87)
New York, New York County (Manhattan), New York, USA
Burial
Charleston, Charleston County, South Carolina, USA
Memorial ID
46178808 View Source

United States Federal Judge. Waring attended the Charleston County schools and graduated from the College of Charleston in 1900, ranking second in his class. He passed the bar exam in 1902 and began his law practice the same year. He practiced law in Charleston through 1942 including a term as Assistant United States Attorney in the Eastern District of South Carolina. On December 18, 1941 President Franklin D. Roosevelt nominated Waring to serve as a federal judge of the United States District Court of the Eastern District of South Carolina. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on January 20, 1942, and received his commission on January 23, 1942. He served as chief judge from 1948 to 1952 and assumed senior status on February 15, 1952. As chief, Waring ended segregated seating in his courtroom and chose a black bailiff. His most memorable case was being a part of a panel of three Federal Judges reviewing Briggs vs Elliott filed in Clarendon County, South Carolina. Briggs vs. Elliott would later be consolidated with Brown vs. Board of Education. Thurgood Marshall, later a U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice, represented the NAACP and Robert McFigg, later the Dean of the University of South Carolina School of Law, represented the School Board. Though the NAACP lost the case two to one, Waring was the dissenter claiming "Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal," which was later adopted by the unanimous decision of the Supreme Court to reverse the lower court's ruling. The decision was an enormous victory for the civil rights movement and Waring's support was paramount to the ultimate decision in their favor.

United States Federal Judge. Waring attended the Charleston County schools and graduated from the College of Charleston in 1900, ranking second in his class. He passed the bar exam in 1902 and began his law practice the same year. He practiced law in Charleston through 1942 including a term as Assistant United States Attorney in the Eastern District of South Carolina. On December 18, 1941 President Franklin D. Roosevelt nominated Waring to serve as a federal judge of the United States District Court of the Eastern District of South Carolina. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on January 20, 1942, and received his commission on January 23, 1942. He served as chief judge from 1948 to 1952 and assumed senior status on February 15, 1952. As chief, Waring ended segregated seating in his courtroom and chose a black bailiff. His most memorable case was being a part of a panel of three Federal Judges reviewing Briggs vs Elliott filed in Clarendon County, South Carolina. Briggs vs. Elliott would later be consolidated with Brown vs. Board of Education. Thurgood Marshall, later a U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice, represented the NAACP and Robert McFigg, later the Dean of the University of South Carolina School of Law, represented the School Board. Though the NAACP lost the case two to one, Waring was the dissenter claiming "Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal," which was later adopted by the unanimous decision of the Supreme Court to reverse the lower court's ruling. The decision was an enormous victory for the civil rights movement and Waring's support was paramount to the ultimate decision in their favor.


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