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Judge Abner Gaines Lipscomb

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Judge Abner Gaines Lipscomb

Birth
Washington County, Texas, USA
Death
1927 (aged 72–73)
Burial
Hempstead, Waller County, Texas, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
View Source
See http://www.lrl.state.tx.us/mobile/memberDisplay.cfm?memberID=3236
and
http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6725/m1/597/
for more information.

The son of Young Gaines Lipscomb and Mary L. Cocke Lipscomb.
***********
LIPSCOMB, HON. ABNER G.
Hon. Abner G. Lipscomb, a prominent member of the Texas bar at Hempstead for over twenty-five years, bears a name that has represented the best traditions and ideals of Texas law and politics from the time of the admission of the state into the Union.
The Hempstead judge and lawyer is a grandson of Abner S. Lipscomb, whose career was of such prominence that his name will always be associated familiarly with the leading names of Texas history. He founded the family in Texas in 1840, at first in Austin County and then in Washington county. A lawyer by profession, he rose to distinction in a few years, and became a member of the first supreme court of Texas, and died while holding that office, in 1856.
The parents of Judge Lipscomb, of Hempstead, were Gaines and Mary L. (Cocke) Lipscomb, the former a native of Alabama and the latter of Old Point Comfort, Virginia. The father was a farmer and stock raiser, residing in Washington County a number of years, but was a resident of Waller County at the time of his death, in 1865. He was a soldier in the Confederate army and was accidentally killed at the close of the war. He and his wife had three children, James C., Abner G. and Frank.
Abner G. Lipscomb was born in Washington county, August 16. 1858. He finished his education in Baylor University when that noted institution was located at Independence, and was graduated in 1878, with the degree of Ph. B. His study of law continued three years, and in 1881 he was admitted to the bar. He has been engaged in practice at Hempstead from that time to the present.
Beginning with the year of his admission to the bar, he was elected to five successive terms as county attorney for Waller county, giving a decade of service in that capacity. He was then elected and served from 1891 to 1897 as county judge. His public service and professional ability have combined to make him one of the most prominent public leaders in this section of Texas, and soon after retiring from the office of county judge he was nominated by the convention of the sixteenth senatorial district and elected to the state senate for the twenty-sixth and twenty seventh legislatures.
Mr. Lipscomb affiliates with the Woodmen of the World and the Improved Order of Red Men. He married, in 1883, Miss Kate Bedell. She is a daughter of George W. E. Bedell, of Montgomery, Alabama. They have one daughter, Abbie. (Historical Review of South-East Texas and the Founders, Leaders and Representative Men, Vol 2, by Dermot Hardy and Maj. Ingham S. Robert, by The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago, 1910
See http://www.lrl.state.tx.us/mobile/memberDisplay.cfm?memberID=3236
and
http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6725/m1/597/
for more information.

The son of Young Gaines Lipscomb and Mary L. Cocke Lipscomb.
***********
LIPSCOMB, HON. ABNER G.
Hon. Abner G. Lipscomb, a prominent member of the Texas bar at Hempstead for over twenty-five years, bears a name that has represented the best traditions and ideals of Texas law and politics from the time of the admission of the state into the Union.
The Hempstead judge and lawyer is a grandson of Abner S. Lipscomb, whose career was of such prominence that his name will always be associated familiarly with the leading names of Texas history. He founded the family in Texas in 1840, at first in Austin County and then in Washington county. A lawyer by profession, he rose to distinction in a few years, and became a member of the first supreme court of Texas, and died while holding that office, in 1856.
The parents of Judge Lipscomb, of Hempstead, were Gaines and Mary L. (Cocke) Lipscomb, the former a native of Alabama and the latter of Old Point Comfort, Virginia. The father was a farmer and stock raiser, residing in Washington County a number of years, but was a resident of Waller County at the time of his death, in 1865. He was a soldier in the Confederate army and was accidentally killed at the close of the war. He and his wife had three children, James C., Abner G. and Frank.
Abner G. Lipscomb was born in Washington county, August 16. 1858. He finished his education in Baylor University when that noted institution was located at Independence, and was graduated in 1878, with the degree of Ph. B. His study of law continued three years, and in 1881 he was admitted to the bar. He has been engaged in practice at Hempstead from that time to the present.
Beginning with the year of his admission to the bar, he was elected to five successive terms as county attorney for Waller county, giving a decade of service in that capacity. He was then elected and served from 1891 to 1897 as county judge. His public service and professional ability have combined to make him one of the most prominent public leaders in this section of Texas, and soon after retiring from the office of county judge he was nominated by the convention of the sixteenth senatorial district and elected to the state senate for the twenty-sixth and twenty seventh legislatures.
Mr. Lipscomb affiliates with the Woodmen of the World and the Improved Order of Red Men. He married, in 1883, Miss Kate Bedell. She is a daughter of George W. E. Bedell, of Montgomery, Alabama. They have one daughter, Abbie. (Historical Review of South-East Texas and the Founders, Leaders and Representative Men, Vol 2, by Dermot Hardy and Maj. Ingham S. Robert, by The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago, 1910

Gravesite Details

Father is Young Gaines Lipscomb 1822-1873. Young Gaines Lipscomb's mother is Elizabeth Gaines Lipscomb (1799-1841). Her father is Young Gaines (about 1760-about 1829).



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