Jason Matthew Pratt

Jason Matthew Pratt

Birth
Braintree, Orange County, Vermont, USA
Death 29 Jun 1911 (aged 71)
Mondovi, Buffalo County, Wisconsin, USA
Burial Gilmanton, Buffalo County, Wisconsin, USA
Memorial ID 45559919 · View Source
Suggest Edits

THE MONDOVI HERALD
Volume 36 Mondovi, Buffalo County, Wisconsin
July 7, 1911
Jason Matthew Pratt
Jason Matthew Pratt, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Pratt was born at Braintree, Vt., July 20, 1839. When he was a baby a year and a half old he lost his mother, and until he was fifteen years of age, he was brought up by Mr. and Mrs. John Waite. His father married again and to this union one girl was born, Hannah, who was married to J.P. Lampson, a business man at West Birchfield. She is still alive to mourn the loss of his half-brother.
When Jason Pratt was fifteen the spirit of adventure got hold of the boy and he went to Kansas. He was one of the pioneers of Lawrence, Kansas and for a time he became the carrier of the United States mail out of that city. But he did not stay long in Kansas. In the same year, 1854, he went to Chicago, where his father preceded him. For awhile he assisted in his business, but soon became a printer's apprentice under S.G. Pitkin, who afterwards became an intimate and lifelong friend. The printer's apprentice in the next year issued the first Market Report printed in Chicago. This was a successful business venture and he owned and published it until the year 1860. If only the lad of 21 had realized the marvelous potentialities of Chicago he might easily have become one of Chicago's rich men. He had the journalistic instinct and the pen of a ready writer. But his father had left Chicago for Gilmanton and to Gilmanton Mr. and Mrs. J.M. Pratt went in 1860; for on February 11 of that year he was married Kathryn S. Keefe, a marriage of enduring affection and lifelong happiness. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Owen Keefe.
Henceforth, until 1903 Mr. Pratt's life became part and parcel of the life of Gilmanton. He and his wife settled down on the farm belonging to Mr. Pratt's father. The following children were born to them: Stephen M., who died of tuberculosis in 1908; Settie K., Albert, and Mamie who were victims of the diphtheria epidemic of evil memories in Gilmanton; Ora I'Dell, now Mrs. G.E. Cody of Gilmanton; Eugene, who died in infancy in 1879; and Charles M. of Eau Claire, on whom devolves the responsibility of looking after the interests and welfare of his widowed mother.
Mr. Pratt's character and characteristics marked him out for public office. He was Town Chairman in Gilmanton for eleven years in succession, and there was no local office of any importance which was not assigned to him at one time or another. From 1884 to 886 he was County Sheriff. For one term held the office of Under-Sheriff and served as Deputy Sheriff for four terms. The holding of these offices is the best proof of his hold on the confidence and esteem of his neighbors and fellow citizens, and of his energy, capacity and probity.
In 1863, on March 31, Mr. Pratt enlisted in Co. H. 9th. Illinois Calvary and served till the end of the war, obtaining his discharge in Selma, Alabama. He was an excellent raconteur and used to tell his experience of the war in interesting and graphic fashion.
In 1903 Mr. and Mrs. Pratt moved to this city and bought the Aunt Gusta Farrington property on which they lived ever since making a host of friends. At the last election Mr. Pratt became Assessor for the city of Mondovi and this writer saw him for the last time when he came to have the Assessor's notice printed that his assessment was completed. But the day was not to come for him to hear any objections that might be made, for death took him. No unexpectedly, to himself. On several occasions he had had a hard fight to retain the breathe that means life. But he remained cheery to the end and laughed and joked with his friends on his last walk to his home. At 2:30 a.m., on Thursday, the 29 the end came. (29 June 1911).
So far, he writer. Let the defter hand of one who knew him better, pen the rest of the story.
The G.A.R. comrades of the deceased, as on many former occasions the year past at the final summons of a comrade, gathered at the home in Mondovi on Sunday, to participate in the last rites of a comrade. Bearing the remains to Gilmanton for burial, his hometown for 50 years, the slow moving cortege halted at the Union church of the village where was assembled a great gathering of his old time friends, neighbors and townsmen. They all wanted a last look at the remains of a man who loved life, oh so dearly, and whose waking presence every hour was marked by sunshine and smiles and laughter. The singing by Messrs. Smith, Kaun, Rowell and Heineck of Mondovi, was finely and feelingly rendered.
The address of C.H. Cooke, a Post Comrade, and friend of half a century, concluded the services at the church. The tone of the speaker was that of a man whose heart was deeply touched as recalled the circumstances and event of the half century of his acquaintance. The comrade who lay in the coffin before him was on the world's heroes, not for any striking act such as history records, but because of the thousand genial, smiling humanities that made up the sum of life with the great mass of men. He was not perfect and who in this strange old world with its perplexities and complexities is absolutely ever perfect? It is not true that only those perfectly pure in heart, from the cradle to the grave, are the most truly righteous. The strong of the earth whose careers make an impress for guidance and betterment of men are the ones in whose breast, as was Jason M. Pratt, there is a continual war between the forces of good and of evil. Sometimes the one is victor, sometimes the other. What ever there was of right or wrong in the immortal part which we call man in the deceased, was planted there by his creator. One and another of his neighbors have all testified that he never resented a wrong and he was always the first to make advances of forgiveness. He was the sunshine for the entire neighborhood. His cheerful tone and kindly rippling fun always dissipated any cloud of despondency and gloom. The example of great acts or great deeds in the world has a meaning that inspires or appeals to the few. The example of a man like Jason Pratt during 50 years of his helpful, laugh-provoking career, will make him remembered in kindliness when those called great in the world shall have faded in oblivion.
The concluding services at the grave were performed by the Knights of Pythias, of whose association he was a member.
Card of Thanks
To the members of G.A.R, the W.R.C. and the K.P. lodge; also to friends and neighbors we wish to express our heartfelt thanks for their tributes of affection and respect to our beloved, husband and father, Jason M. Pratt, and for all their help, sympathy and kindness.
Mrs. J.M. Pratt and Family.


Family Members

Parents
Half Siblings

Sponsored by Ancestry

Advertisement

Plan a visit to Gilmanton Cemetery?

Advertisement

Advertisement

  • Created by: Roger G Perkins
  • Added: 17 Dec 2009
  • Find A Grave Memorial 45559919
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Jason Matthew Pratt (20 Jul 1839–29 Jun 1911), Find A Grave Memorial no. 45559919, citing Gilmanton Cemetery, Gilmanton, Buffalo County, Wisconsin, USA ; Maintained by Roger G Perkins (contributor 46939698) .