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 William Wing Loring

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William Wing Loring Famous memorial

Birth
Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina, USA
Death
30 Dec 1886 (aged 68)
New York, New York County (Manhattan), New York, USA
Burial
Saint Augustine, St. Johns County, Florida, USA
Plot
Garden of Rest section SE
Memorial ID
4534 View Source

Military Figure. He had an outstanding forty-seven-year military career, serving as an officer in the armies of the United States, the Confederate States, and Egypt. Born the son of Reuben and Hannah Kenan Loring, his family relocated from North Carolina to St. Augustine in 1823 when he was a young child. At the age of 14, he volunteered for the Florida Militia, and he served as an officer in the Second Seminole War, fighting in the bloody Battle of Withlacoochee on December 31, 1835. He attended Georgetown University from 1839 to 1840, which followed with studying law and being admitted to the Florida bar in 1842. In 1843, he was elected to the Florida House of Representatives where he served from 1843 to 1845 during Florida's Territorial era. In 1845 after Florida became a state, he ran unsuccessfully for the Florida Senate. He traveled to Europe, studying military tactics. During the Mexican War from 1846 to 1848, he was a captain of the Mounted Riflemen and was wounded three times with his mangled left arm being amputated in September of 1847 at the Battle of Chapultepec. On March 5, 1848, he was presented with a sword from the citizens of Florida with the inscription of General Winfield Scott's words, "Brave rifles, you have gone through fire and blood, and come out steel." Continuing his military career in 1849, he led an expedition of 600 mule teams from Missouri to Oregon, a tremendous accomplishment for the time. He served in the US 11th Military Department and was engaged along the Rio Grande frontier against hostile Native Americans, including the Comanche and Kiowa. In December of 1856, he was promoted to colonel, making him one of the youngest colonels in the United States Army. In 1859, he commanded the Department of New Mexico, until he resigned in 1861, to join the Confederate Army as a Brigadier General in the Army of Northern Virginia. Promoted Major General in February of 1862, he led a division for the entire war. After the war, he held a position in New York City in banking and investments. In 1869 he was accepted, along with fifty former Union and Confederate officers, for service in the Army of the Khedive of Egypt. Appointed General-in-Chief of the Egyptian Army, he took command of Alexandria and its defenses extending along the coast to the Rosetta to the mouth of the Nile River. For his services, he was decorated by the Khedive with the Imperial Order of the Osmariah and returned to the United States in March of 1879. In 1881 he was an unsuccessful candidate for the United States Senate before relocating from Florida to New York. The "New York Times" claimed him to be an authority on Egypt. In 1884 he published a narrative of his most recent military career, "A Confederate Soldier in Egypt." He never finished his autobiography Fifty Years a Soldier". A life-long bachelor, he died at the St. Dennis Hotel in New York City of pneumonia. Originally, he was cremated with his ashes buried at Grace Episcopal Church in New York City on January 2, 1887. On March 18th of the same year, he was reburied with a military funeral with thousands of mourners attending in Woodlawn Cemetery in St. Augustine. In 1920, his ashes made a third journey as they were reinterred behind the Government House in downtown St. Augustine in Loring Park, with a 14-ton marble obelisk marking his grave. On August 24, 2020 at his family's request, the University of Florida Historic St. Augustine, Incorporated exhumed his ashes, a plaque engraved with his name and date of re-interred at this site, and the remains of his sword. All items were re-interred in his fourth grave site in Craig Memorial Park. This was done to remove from public own property any evidence of "celebrating the Confederacy or its leaders." In 2020, the marble obelisk honoring him in Loring Park was removed by his family and placed on private property. His family donated many of his personal items including a uniform and a sword to the Museum of Florida History. Upon the 1921 death of his niece, Mrs. William Loring Spencer, a scholarship in his name had been established at the University of Florida, yet with exhausted funding was stopped in 1997.

Military Figure. He had an outstanding forty-seven-year military career, serving as an officer in the armies of the United States, the Confederate States, and Egypt. Born the son of Reuben and Hannah Kenan Loring, his family relocated from North Carolina to St. Augustine in 1823 when he was a young child. At the age of 14, he volunteered for the Florida Militia, and he served as an officer in the Second Seminole War, fighting in the bloody Battle of Withlacoochee on December 31, 1835. He attended Georgetown University from 1839 to 1840, which followed with studying law and being admitted to the Florida bar in 1842. In 1843, he was elected to the Florida House of Representatives where he served from 1843 to 1845 during Florida's Territorial era. In 1845 after Florida became a state, he ran unsuccessfully for the Florida Senate. He traveled to Europe, studying military tactics. During the Mexican War from 1846 to 1848, he was a captain of the Mounted Riflemen and was wounded three times with his mangled left arm being amputated in September of 1847 at the Battle of Chapultepec. On March 5, 1848, he was presented with a sword from the citizens of Florida with the inscription of General Winfield Scott's words, "Brave rifles, you have gone through fire and blood, and come out steel." Continuing his military career in 1849, he led an expedition of 600 mule teams from Missouri to Oregon, a tremendous accomplishment for the time. He served in the US 11th Military Department and was engaged along the Rio Grande frontier against hostile Native Americans, including the Comanche and Kiowa. In December of 1856, he was promoted to colonel, making him one of the youngest colonels in the United States Army. In 1859, he commanded the Department of New Mexico, until he resigned in 1861, to join the Confederate Army as a Brigadier General in the Army of Northern Virginia. Promoted Major General in February of 1862, he led a division for the entire war. After the war, he held a position in New York City in banking and investments. In 1869 he was accepted, along with fifty former Union and Confederate officers, for service in the Army of the Khedive of Egypt. Appointed General-in-Chief of the Egyptian Army, he took command of Alexandria and its defenses extending along the coast to the Rosetta to the mouth of the Nile River. For his services, he was decorated by the Khedive with the Imperial Order of the Osmariah and returned to the United States in March of 1879. In 1881 he was an unsuccessful candidate for the United States Senate before relocating from Florida to New York. The "New York Times" claimed him to be an authority on Egypt. In 1884 he published a narrative of his most recent military career, "A Confederate Soldier in Egypt." He never finished his autobiography Fifty Years a Soldier". A life-long bachelor, he died at the St. Dennis Hotel in New York City of pneumonia. Originally, he was cremated with his ashes buried at Grace Episcopal Church in New York City on January 2, 1887. On March 18th of the same year, he was reburied with a military funeral with thousands of mourners attending in Woodlawn Cemetery in St. Augustine. In 1920, his ashes made a third journey as they were reinterred behind the Government House in downtown St. Augustine in Loring Park, with a 14-ton marble obelisk marking his grave. On August 24, 2020 at his family's request, the University of Florida Historic St. Augustine, Incorporated exhumed his ashes, a plaque engraved with his name and date of re-interred at this site, and the remains of his sword. All items were re-interred in his fourth grave site in Craig Memorial Park. This was done to remove from public own property any evidence of "celebrating the Confederacy or its leaders." In 2020, the marble obelisk honoring him in Loring Park was removed by his family and placed on private property. His family donated many of his personal items including a uniform and a sword to the Museum of Florida History. Upon the 1921 death of his niece, Mrs. William Loring Spencer, a scholarship in his name had been established at the University of Florida, yet with exhausted funding was stopped in 1997.

Bio by: Linda Davis

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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Added: 11 Feb 1999
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 4534
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/4534/william-wing-loring: accessed ), memorial page for William Wing Loring (4 Dec 1818–30 Dec 1886), Find a Grave Memorial ID 4534, citing Craig Memorial Park, Saint Augustine, St. Johns County, Florida, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave.