Suzanne Duchamp

Suzanne Duchamp

Birth
Death 11 Sep 1963 (aged 73–74)
Burial Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
Memorial ID 44244628 · View Source
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Painter. She was a 20th Century French artist who received recognition for her paintings in the “Dada” style of art. The Dada group of artists developed in Germany, France and Switzerland with bizarre, abstract art pieces, which may have been a political reaction to the horrors of World War I, and faded from popularity by 1922. At the age of sixteen years old, she studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Rouen near her home. Her earliest works reflected the Impressionism and Cubism styles. To expand her career as an artist, she moved, at the age of 21, to the Montparnasse Quarter of Paris where her brother Marcel resided. Her first major exhibition was at the Salon des Independants in Paris the next year. She was the fourth of six children of Eugene and Lucie Duchamp. Three of her brothers were successful artists: Jacque Villon was an abstract painter; Raymond Duchamp-Villon, a sculptor who died during World War I and Marcel Duchamp, a painter. Her brothers were part of the Puteaux group. Having brothers, who were successful artists, helped her with the recognition in the artistic world as women did have, during this era, a difficult time embarking in an art career. With the outbreak of World War I, she served as a nurse for the French army. As a result of the war, she produced barely nothing until 1916 when she painted her first Dadaist piece, which was finished in 1919 “Broken and Restored Multiplications” and married her second husband and fellow artist, Jean Crotti. This Dada style painting has the Eiffel Tower turned up-side-down, a cityscape reflected in a broken mirror, and words running up and down the painting in bright colors, which shows her thoughts in an abstract painting of World War I. This followed in 1920 with “Ariette of Oblivion I the Thoughtless Chapel,” which is said to be her strongest Dada painting. She stated that she pulled from her own war experiences to paint these works. The same year she had an exhibition at the Salon de Independants in Paris, along with Francis Picabia and her husband. In 1921 she and her husband organized a two-person show of their pieces at the Galerie Montagine. The catalog to the exhibition featured the title “TABU Dada,” which pointed the way to a new stage of their paintings. In 1922 she started her post-Dada style that were figurative paintings in a naive style. Those pieces resembled the works of Raoul Dufy or Henri Rousseau. As the years passed, her husband received much more attention with his work, but nevertheless, she continued to exhibit her paintings. In 1956 she had a solo exhibition in Paris. Not only did she paint, but she did etchings and drawings on Christmas cards. In 1967 Marcel Duchamp organized an exhibition entitled “Les Duchamp,” which featured her works along with her brothers. Marcel also published the “Ten Letters from Marcel Duchamp to Suzanne Duchamp and Jean Crotti,” in “Archives of American Art Journal” Vol. 22, No. 4 (1982) pp. 2-19. Today, her paintings are being sold at auction between $500 to $5,000 each. She is buried with her siblings and her husband with his family.

Bio by: Linda Davis


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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Originally Created by: Rik Van Beveren
  • Added: 12 Nov 2009
  • Find A Grave Memorial 44244628
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Suzanne Duchamp (1889–11 Sep 1963), Find A Grave Memorial no. 44244628, citing Cimetière Monumentale, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France ; Maintained by Find A Grave .