Michael Grant Cahill

Michael Grant Cahill

Birth
Spokane, Spokane County, Washington, USA
Death 5 Nov 2009 (aged 62)
Fort Hood, Bell County, Texas, USA
Burial Roundup, Musselshell County, Montana, USA
Memorial ID 44000947 View Source
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Michael Grant Cahill was a victim of the attack at Ft. Hood Army Post November 5, 2009. A disgruntled U.S. Army psychiatrist killed 13 people and injured more than 30 others before he was brought down. Michael was born July 16, 1947 in Spokane, Washington, to Richard and Edith Cahill. He is survived by his wife Joleen (Murphy), his daughter Keely Vanacker (Lee) of Kerrville, Texas, son James Cahill of Levelland, Texas, daughter Kerry Cahill of Chicago, IL, grandson Brody Vanacker , sister Marilyn Cahill Attebery of Spokane Valley, Washington, sister Rebecca Cahill of Lincoln City, Oregon and numerous cousins, nieces and nephews. He grew up in Spokane, Washington and in 1965 graduated from Rogers High School where he was a member of the cross country team. He joined the 161st Unit National Guard around 1966 and was trained as an infantryman. Mike attended Spokane Community College and Eastern Washington University, earning a B.A. degree in psychology in 1973. He also attended Carroll College and Northern Montana College in Montana. He met his wife Joleen (Murphy) a Gonzaga University student in 1969. They were married in Spokane on September 24, 1972 at St. Anthony's Catholic Church. They spent their honeymoon backpacking around Europe. During their early married years, they resided in Montana; Great Falls, Havre, Boulder, and Wolf Creek. He was an EMT, working at Columbus Hospital and the Boulder State School. Mike then became a Physician Assistant through the Army National Guard at Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas. He graduated in 1985 with a degree from the University of Oklahoma and Commissioned a Warrant Officer CW2. He then moved the family back home to Montana and practiced at a V. A. Clinic in Billings. The family then moved to Oregon, where he practiced at the V.A. Hospital in Portland and a small rural clinic in Bly. He was the last 24/7 health care professional to work at the remote Bly clinic. In 1992 the family moved to Post, Texas where he continued family practice at a small health care clinic. He retired from the Army National Guard after 23 years of service with the following units; Spokane, Washington; Havre, Helena and Bozeman, Montana; Portland and Medford, Oregon; and Lubbock, Texas. At that time, Mike was presented with a unique opportunity to work for Hughes Corporation at a remote missile site in Russia, as a medical care provider and an inspector. After which the family moved to Cameron, Texas in 1997 where Mike continued his life's work--practicing family and rural health care with Dr. Sydney Richardson. His career brought him to the V.A. Hospital in Temple, Texas and the last 7 years at Ft. Hood ‘s health care clinics and the Soldier Readiness Center. Mike was involved with the Rural Health Initiative in Texas and the Texas Academy of Physician Assistants, where he also served on the board as secretary and was an adjunct professor for Baylor University teaching the next generation of Physician Assistants. He also served on a variety of committees, MHMR Boards, and health organizations. Mike was a voracious reader of history, biographies, science fiction (especially Ursula LeGuin), medicine and current events often reading two or three books at one time. He had many hobbies including photography, collecting antiques, stamps, coins, researching genealogy, and participating in the local community theater. He loved old movies especially Dr. Zhivago. Mike made it his mission to stay current on world events and politics and could talk for hours with anyone about virtually any topic. He had a love for travel that he passed on to his entire family. Which is why Mike was so proud of his children for being able to study abroad and fulfill their educational and personal dreams. He loved his wife dearly and could not have imagined life without her. He was deeply passionate about his work and having the honor of caring for patients and the soldiers at Ft. Hood.