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Marcus Hervey Townsend

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Marcus Hervey Townsend

Birth
Oakland, Colorado County, Texas, USA
Death
28 Jun 1915 (aged 57)
USA
Burial
San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas, USA Add to Map
Plot
Space 9, Lot 179, Section 4 - Restland
Memorial ID
View Source
Lawyer, politician; Member Texas state house, 1882-1887; 1888-elected to Texas state senate: 1886 - authored the measure authorizing the purchase of the Alamo by the state of Texas and was chairman of the committee on the part of the House which made said purchase.

San Antonio, Tex. June 29-- M. H. Townsend, widely known as a lawyer and financier in South Texas, died yesterday afternoon at 5:30 at his home, 508 Fifth Street. Mr. Townsend was author of the bill and chairman of the legislative committee that brought about the purchase of the Alamo Building. The funeral will take place this afternoon at 4:40 o'clock from the residence. Interment will be in Mission Burial Park. Rev. Wilbur F. Packard, pastor of the Travis Park Methodist Church, will conduct the services. The pallbearers will be: Active--J.L. Kerr, E.A. Hutchins, W.R. King, W.B. William, J.E. Richey, T.F. Mangum, George C. Saur, F.G. Hiltje, Honorary--T. A. Hill of Weimar, George Burgess of Gonzales, Jonathan Lane, M.H. Garwood and W.T. Eldridge of Houston, Thomas F. Boulden of Columbus, Ike T. Pryor, Clifton George, Dr. Fred Terrell and T.H. Franklin. Mr. Townsend was born in Colorado County in 1858, reared on a farm and educated in the common schools of the county. His parents were Moses B. and Anna E. Townsend, both now dead. Left fatherless at the age of nine years, he determined to acquire an education. He studied law at old Baylor University at Independence, and was admitted to the bar in 1880. From 1886 to 1906 he was a member of the law firm of Foard, Thompson and Townsend at Columbus, and during this time participated in many noted criminal and civil cases, among others the Eldridge case tried at Richmond, his client being acquitted. Mr. Townsend began his public life in the Texas House of Representatives, eighteenth Legislature, in 1882, having been elected from Colorado County, and the first Democrat ever named over a Republican in that county. He succeded in having a new county, Foard, created in North Central Texas, and was so named in honor of his law partner, Major Foard, formerly of Columbus. Mr. Townsend was well known throughout South and Southwest Texas as a man of decided convictions, clear, masterful mind, quick and active in business as well as in his profession, tireless, unrelenting and fearless in his efforts to accomplish anythng he thought right. He was a director of the City National Bank of San Antonio, and known as a man who builded and developed. His greatest pleasure was to see his friends and those he loved prosper and succeed.

Weimar Mercury, July 2, 1915
*********
TOWNSEND, Hon. M. H.
Hon. M. H. Townsend, representing the eleventh district, composed of the counties of Gonzales, Lavaca, Colorado, and Wharton, in the Senate for the Twenty-first session of the Texas Legislature, was born March 20, 1838, in Colorado county, Texas.
Although left fatherless at nine years of age, and with limited means, he determined to acquire an education, and after availing himself of all the advantages offered by the public schools of Colorado county, he attended lectures in the Law Department of Baylor University at Independence, Texas. He was admitted to the bar in 1880, and in 1886 became a member of the law firm of Foard & Thompson, at Columbus, where he commenced the practice of his profession, and still resides.
Mr. Townsend represented the county of Colorado in the House of Representatives of the Eighteenth Legislature, where he at once established the reputation of a carful and industrious legislator, being the first Democrat ever elected over a republican nominee to the Legislature from the Sixty ninth Representative District composed of Colorado county alone. He was one of the Vice-Presidents of the State Democratic Convention held in Galveston August, 1886, which nominated L. S. Ross for Governor.
Mr. Townsend was elected to the Senate in 1888, over his Republican competitor, by a majority of 4,176 votes. This is a high compliment, from the fact that it is more than double the majority ever received by any other nominee of his party from that Senatorial district.
He is Chairman of the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds, and his name appears first on the list of new Senators on the Committee on Finance, which entitles him to the chairmanship of that committee at the next session of the Legislature.
He is also a member of Judiciary Committees Nos. 1 and 2, of Roads and Bridges, of Penitentiaries, of Claims and Accounts, Federal Relations, Public Debt, Counties and County Boundaries, and of History, Statistics and Insurance, from which it will be seen that his life at Austin will be a busy one.
Senator Townsend has introduced eleven bills at the present session, ten of which have been reported favorably by the several committees, one unfavorably. Five have passed up to date. He introduced three bills by request. Among other bills, he is the author of the bill, now pending, to reduce the occupation tax on the retail sale of native (Texas) wine, also a bill to fix the liability of corporations for injury to employees, resulting from the carelessness or negligence of public servants. He was the author of the measure authorizing the purchase of the "Alamo" by the State and was Chairman of the committee on the part of the House which made such purchase.
Senator Townsend has a dignified and unostentatious appearance. He is about five feet eleven inches tall, well proportioned, a good head and intelligent face. He belongs to the Saxon type and is enthusiastic and earnest in all matters in which he is interested. He has fine command of pure English and speaks extemporaneously with east and clearness. He is a man of very decided character, with settled high moral principles. His manners are gentle, and his social relations ardent and tender. He is a reliable man in any and all capacities and is so trusted by those who know him and by his contemporaries in the Senate.
Senator Townsend was married to Miss Annie E. Burford, daughter of the late F. M. Burford, who was one of the pioneer settlers of Southwest Texas.
Either in the law or the wider field of the political arena, Senator Townsend gives promise of eminent success. (The Colorado Citizen, Columbus, Tex, Oct 22, 1889 )
Lawyer, politician; Member Texas state house, 1882-1887; 1888-elected to Texas state senate: 1886 - authored the measure authorizing the purchase of the Alamo by the state of Texas and was chairman of the committee on the part of the House which made said purchase.

San Antonio, Tex. June 29-- M. H. Townsend, widely known as a lawyer and financier in South Texas, died yesterday afternoon at 5:30 at his home, 508 Fifth Street. Mr. Townsend was author of the bill and chairman of the legislative committee that brought about the purchase of the Alamo Building. The funeral will take place this afternoon at 4:40 o'clock from the residence. Interment will be in Mission Burial Park. Rev. Wilbur F. Packard, pastor of the Travis Park Methodist Church, will conduct the services. The pallbearers will be: Active--J.L. Kerr, E.A. Hutchins, W.R. King, W.B. William, J.E. Richey, T.F. Mangum, George C. Saur, F.G. Hiltje, Honorary--T. A. Hill of Weimar, George Burgess of Gonzales, Jonathan Lane, M.H. Garwood and W.T. Eldridge of Houston, Thomas F. Boulden of Columbus, Ike T. Pryor, Clifton George, Dr. Fred Terrell and T.H. Franklin. Mr. Townsend was born in Colorado County in 1858, reared on a farm and educated in the common schools of the county. His parents were Moses B. and Anna E. Townsend, both now dead. Left fatherless at the age of nine years, he determined to acquire an education. He studied law at old Baylor University at Independence, and was admitted to the bar in 1880. From 1886 to 1906 he was a member of the law firm of Foard, Thompson and Townsend at Columbus, and during this time participated in many noted criminal and civil cases, among others the Eldridge case tried at Richmond, his client being acquitted. Mr. Townsend began his public life in the Texas House of Representatives, eighteenth Legislature, in 1882, having been elected from Colorado County, and the first Democrat ever named over a Republican in that county. He succeded in having a new county, Foard, created in North Central Texas, and was so named in honor of his law partner, Major Foard, formerly of Columbus. Mr. Townsend was well known throughout South and Southwest Texas as a man of decided convictions, clear, masterful mind, quick and active in business as well as in his profession, tireless, unrelenting and fearless in his efforts to accomplish anythng he thought right. He was a director of the City National Bank of San Antonio, and known as a man who builded and developed. His greatest pleasure was to see his friends and those he loved prosper and succeed.

Weimar Mercury, July 2, 1915
*********
TOWNSEND, Hon. M. H.
Hon. M. H. Townsend, representing the eleventh district, composed of the counties of Gonzales, Lavaca, Colorado, and Wharton, in the Senate for the Twenty-first session of the Texas Legislature, was born March 20, 1838, in Colorado county, Texas.
Although left fatherless at nine years of age, and with limited means, he determined to acquire an education, and after availing himself of all the advantages offered by the public schools of Colorado county, he attended lectures in the Law Department of Baylor University at Independence, Texas. He was admitted to the bar in 1880, and in 1886 became a member of the law firm of Foard & Thompson, at Columbus, where he commenced the practice of his profession, and still resides.
Mr. Townsend represented the county of Colorado in the House of Representatives of the Eighteenth Legislature, where he at once established the reputation of a carful and industrious legislator, being the first Democrat ever elected over a republican nominee to the Legislature from the Sixty ninth Representative District composed of Colorado county alone. He was one of the Vice-Presidents of the State Democratic Convention held in Galveston August, 1886, which nominated L. S. Ross for Governor.
Mr. Townsend was elected to the Senate in 1888, over his Republican competitor, by a majority of 4,176 votes. This is a high compliment, from the fact that it is more than double the majority ever received by any other nominee of his party from that Senatorial district.
He is Chairman of the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds, and his name appears first on the list of new Senators on the Committee on Finance, which entitles him to the chairmanship of that committee at the next session of the Legislature.
He is also a member of Judiciary Committees Nos. 1 and 2, of Roads and Bridges, of Penitentiaries, of Claims and Accounts, Federal Relations, Public Debt, Counties and County Boundaries, and of History, Statistics and Insurance, from which it will be seen that his life at Austin will be a busy one.
Senator Townsend has introduced eleven bills at the present session, ten of which have been reported favorably by the several committees, one unfavorably. Five have passed up to date. He introduced three bills by request. Among other bills, he is the author of the bill, now pending, to reduce the occupation tax on the retail sale of native (Texas) wine, also a bill to fix the liability of corporations for injury to employees, resulting from the carelessness or negligence of public servants. He was the author of the measure authorizing the purchase of the "Alamo" by the State and was Chairman of the committee on the part of the House which made such purchase.
Senator Townsend has a dignified and unostentatious appearance. He is about five feet eleven inches tall, well proportioned, a good head and intelligent face. He belongs to the Saxon type and is enthusiastic and earnest in all matters in which he is interested. He has fine command of pure English and speaks extemporaneously with east and clearness. He is a man of very decided character, with settled high moral principles. His manners are gentle, and his social relations ardent and tender. He is a reliable man in any and all capacities and is so trusted by those who know him and by his contemporaries in the Senate.
Senator Townsend was married to Miss Annie E. Burford, daughter of the late F. M. Burford, who was one of the pioneer settlers of Southwest Texas.
Either in the law or the wider field of the political arena, Senator Townsend gives promise of eminent success. (The Colorado Citizen, Columbus, Tex, Oct 22, 1889 )


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