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Laura Emeline <I>Pixley</I> Newell

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Laura Emeline Pixley Newell

Birth
New Marlborough, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, USA
Death
13 Oct 1916 (aged 62)
Manhattan, Riley County, Kansas, USA
Burial
Wabaunsee, Wabaunsee County, Kansas, USA Add to Map
Plot
SE
Memorial ID
View Source
Hymn writer. She wrote "As the Life of a Flower."

Laura Emeline Pixley Newell was an American songwriter, known for having composed over 400 hymns. She was born in New Marlborough, Massachusetts, on February 5, 1854. She was a daughter of Edward A. Pixley (1833-1886) and Anna Laura Osborn (1835-1854). Her mother died when Laura was only a few days old, and the child was adopted by her aunt, Mrs. Hiram Mabie and later Mrs. E. H. Emerson, of New York City.[1] In 1858, the Mabies moved to a farm south of Wamego, Kansas. Two years after the move, Hiram Mabie died, and his wife resumed teaching and in 1860 moved to Topeka, Kansas. Newell studied under her.[2] Newell was a prolific writer of songs and poems. She began to write poetry at an early age, publishing when she was fourteen years old. Many of her early productions appeared in local papers. Her first attempt to enter a broader field was made in Arthur's Magazine. Several of her songs were set to music and published in the East Coast, and since their appearance she devoted herself mainly to the writing of songs for sacred or secular music. [1] Throughout her career, she has written and published over four thousand poems and songs.[3] Besides those, she also wrote verses. In 1890 several hundreds of her productions were published in various forms. She wrote in all veins, but her particular liking was for sacred songs. She also adapted words to music for composers. In 1891 a Chicago house published a children's day service of hers, entitled "Gems for His Crown," over eighteen-thousand copies of which were readily sold. In 1892 the same firm accepted three services of hers, "Grateful Offerings to Our King," a children's day service, "Harvest Sheaves," for Thanksgiving or harvest home exercises, and "The Prince of Peace," a Christmas service.[1] Her home was in Zeandale, Kansas. In 1871, she married Lauren Newell (1838-1921),[2] an architect and builder, and he worked at his trade. Her family consisted of six children. [1] She died on October 13, 1916, in Manhattan, Kansas, and is buried at Wabaunsee Cemetery, Wabaunsee, Kansas.[2]

Sources:
Willard, Frances Elizabeth, 1839-1898; Livermore, Mary Ashton Rice, 1820-1905 (1893). A woman of the century; fourteen hundred-seventy biographical sketches accompanied by portraits of leading American women in all walks of life. Buffalo, N.Y., Moulton. p. 533. Retrieved 8 August 2017. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain. --"Laura Emeline Pixley Newell". Retrieved 2 October 2017. Contributor: Elisa Rolle (48982101)
Hymn writer. She wrote "As the Life of a Flower."

Laura Emeline Pixley Newell was an American songwriter, known for having composed over 400 hymns. She was born in New Marlborough, Massachusetts, on February 5, 1854. She was a daughter of Edward A. Pixley (1833-1886) and Anna Laura Osborn (1835-1854). Her mother died when Laura was only a few days old, and the child was adopted by her aunt, Mrs. Hiram Mabie and later Mrs. E. H. Emerson, of New York City.[1] In 1858, the Mabies moved to a farm south of Wamego, Kansas. Two years after the move, Hiram Mabie died, and his wife resumed teaching and in 1860 moved to Topeka, Kansas. Newell studied under her.[2] Newell was a prolific writer of songs and poems. She began to write poetry at an early age, publishing when she was fourteen years old. Many of her early productions appeared in local papers. Her first attempt to enter a broader field was made in Arthur's Magazine. Several of her songs were set to music and published in the East Coast, and since their appearance she devoted herself mainly to the writing of songs for sacred or secular music. [1] Throughout her career, she has written and published over four thousand poems and songs.[3] Besides those, she also wrote verses. In 1890 several hundreds of her productions were published in various forms. She wrote in all veins, but her particular liking was for sacred songs. She also adapted words to music for composers. In 1891 a Chicago house published a children's day service of hers, entitled "Gems for His Crown," over eighteen-thousand copies of which were readily sold. In 1892 the same firm accepted three services of hers, "Grateful Offerings to Our King," a children's day service, "Harvest Sheaves," for Thanksgiving or harvest home exercises, and "The Prince of Peace," a Christmas service.[1] Her home was in Zeandale, Kansas. In 1871, she married Lauren Newell (1838-1921),[2] an architect and builder, and he worked at his trade. Her family consisted of six children. [1] She died on October 13, 1916, in Manhattan, Kansas, and is buried at Wabaunsee Cemetery, Wabaunsee, Kansas.[2]

Sources:
Willard, Frances Elizabeth, 1839-1898; Livermore, Mary Ashton Rice, 1820-1905 (1893). A woman of the century; fourteen hundred-seventy biographical sketches accompanied by portraits of leading American women in all walks of life. Buffalo, N.Y., Moulton. p. 533. Retrieved 8 August 2017. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain. --"Laura Emeline Pixley Newell". Retrieved 2 October 2017. Contributor: Elisa Rolle (48982101)


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