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 George Robert Bacon

George Robert Bacon

Birth
Bourbon, Douglas County, Illinois, USA
Death 17 Dec 1911 (aged 66)
Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA
Burial Decatur, Macon County, Illinois, USA
Memorial ID 42095842 · View Source
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Graduated from West Point. Class of 1869.

Daily Review 12/18/1911 Pages 1 and 14

Captain George R.Bacon died at 4:40 Sunday morning at Augustana hospital in Chicago. The end was expected any time during the night. He had a sinking spell about 6:30 and physicians and nurses thought that he was dying The Stimulants were administered, however and he rallied, becoming conscious recognizing Mrs. Bacon and friends, giving the nurses hope that he might survive for some time. Even as late as midnight one of the physicians said he might live a few days longer but certainly was not expected that he would died before morning. He was last conscious about 9:30 however, from 1:30 he sank slowly. The last few hours were entirely peaceful. There was all most no movement, only a gentle breathing that grew gradually weaken. At the very last he sank quietly into a peaceful slumber.
News of the death of Captain Bacon was sent to Decatur immediately and spread with surprising rapidity. His friends everywhere had inquired the first thing Sunday morning for news and it did not take long to find someone who had the word that he had passed away.
As stated Sunday morning it is likely that there have not been so many inquiries about the condition of anyone as about Captain Bacon. He seemed to be known to everybody in town and always acquaintances asked about him as if about a close personal friend. News of Captain Bacons condition was the first question Sunday morning. His death seemed to affect everyone in a most personal way.
The body was brought to Decatur on the Wabash Banner Limited arriving at ? and was taken to the residence. Mrs. Bacon, Rev.R.W.Gammon and Miss Anabrad chandler accompanied it. A large number of friends about thirty men and women, were at the station when it arrived to show by their presence their regard for Captain Bacon and sympathy for Mrs.Bacon. Mrs. Bacon has stood the ordeal of the last two or three days with remarkable fortitude.
Captain Bacons death was caused by actinomycosis, an infectious disease causing a swelling of the throat and jaw. It is seldom cured. He had been suffering with it for about nine months, during which time he lost heavily in weight. Dr.A.J. Ochaner, the specialist expressed the belief last Monday that if an operation could be performed at once there was hope for his life.
The funeral will be held at 2 oclock Tuesday afternoon at the Congregational church. The services will be in charge of Rev.H.S. Roblee. He will make an address and so will Rev. R. W.Gammon. Professor W.B. Olds will sing and Miss Gebhart will be at the organ. This will be the only music. The honorary pallbearers will be T. L.Evans,Luther Barnards S.H.Welfly, deacons of the church and Judge W. L. Nelson. Active pallbearers will be Clyde Lyon, E.P. Irving, Sylvester Judd, W.T.Hardy, H.C. Schaub, J.C.Hessler.
It is known that there will be a large number of relatives and friends from other places including, Champaign, Peoria and Tuscola. Mr. and Mrs. Francis Everett of Chicago and Norris Hentrotin, son of Mrs. Ella Henrotin, will be here from Chicago.
The flowers will be in charge of the flower circle of the Congregational church, assisted by Misses, Childs, Arthur and Mrs. Foster Waits. The Young Womens Bible class of the Congregational Sunday school, with Mrs. L.C. Woodruff the teacher, has been at the residence all day and will be there until after the funeral, receiving callers and assisting in any way that is possible.
As stated Sunday morning it is likely that there have not been so many inquiries about the condition of anyone as about Captain Bacon. He seemed to be known to everybody in town and always acquaintances asked about him as if about a close personal friend. News of Captain Bacons condition was the first question Sunday morning. His death seemed to effect everyone in a most personal way.
Captain Bacon was a man that had never said anything for himself or about himself or had never pushed himself forward in any way. He had come into personal contact with an unusually large number of people and all had known him as unselfish, generous and a real gentleman. His manner was always marked by the most perfect courtesy, but even comparative strangers felt that it was of the truest courtesy, prompted by the finest feelings of a generous, thoughtful, beautiful character. He was severe enough with himself in any matter that called for sacrifice or faithfulness to duty but could resist few appeals to his generosity and gave with a free hand.
The personality and fine character of Captain Bacon was illustrated by the impression he made on the physicians and nurses at the hospital in the few days that he was there. In the hospital he faced death with the calmness and fortitude of a solider, uttering never a word of apprehension or faltering even in the tones of his voice, though he knew as did all the others what the end might be.
Captain Bacons life up until his retirement from the army in 1878 at the age of thirty two had been an eventful one and one that promised to grow into military fame.
Born on a farm just south of the little village of Bourbon in Douglas county, Illinois on Sept, 28, 1845 he was the son of Dr.George W. Bacon, a Quaker, who had come west in about 1833 and taken up land patents under four different presidents. His father was a well to do physician near Bourbon and a cousin of the famous Dr.Wood of Philadelphia. Dr. Bacon died when Captain Bacon was yet a boy. A part of the old log cabin in which Captain Bacon was born yet remains and only recently an old tree that he planted there when he was a boy, died.
Captain Bacons lineage could be traced back to Lord Bacon. The mother of Captain Bacon was formerly Miss Prudence, Beavers, whose family had come from Virginia. The death of Captain Bacons father was due to exposure incident to attending a patient, it being necessary to ride a long distance through a severe storm to reach the sick bed. Some years later Captain Bacons mother married Lemuel Chandler.
Captain Bacons early schooling consisted of the ordinary public school training of those days followed by a short course in a private academy at Mattoon. When nineteen he was given the appointment to West Point Naval academy in 1869 and he was graduated. He immediately entered the army service and went to the Indian wars in the west. Captain Bacons war experience was filled with hardships. He was personally acquainted with Buffalo Bill, Wild Bill Hickok, General Custer and all others who had gained any prominence as Indian fighters. On entering the service Captain Bacon was first ordered to California and the trip over the mountains brought on a severe illness. After his recovery he was never sick again until the illness that resulted in his death. He was on garrison duty at Angel Island, Cal., until Jan.26, 1870. He was then ordered to Camp Grant, Ariz. Then he was transferred to Camp Hallack, Nev. There he remained until Feb. 9, 1870.
Captain Bacon, then ranking as second lieutenant, secured leave of absence and returned to Tuscola and there on March 31, 1871 he and Miss Eugenie McKenzie were married. He returned with her to the front almost immediately. The trip was a long and tiresome one. They first went to the cavalry barracks at St.Louis, then over the Central Pacific to San Francisco,by boat to Portland, Ore. and then up the Columbia river to Walla Walla, Wash. From there the trip was made in an army ambulance to Camp Harney, where Captain Bacon was stationed for three years. Because of hardships to his wife he resigned June 15, 1878.
He then went to Champaign where he opened up in the paper and printing business much like the one he has conducted here for many years. Every since that time he has remained in that one line of business.
The Bacons lived at Champaign for four years and then moved to Decatur buying the property where the store and home now stand at the northwest corner of Eldorado and N. Main streets. He first built the factory and then the house and although the house has been remodeled considerably,the factory has never been changed in the thirty years. There his business grew and he has been successful financially.
He was of quiet nature but still had been prominent and public spirited. As a churchman, he was a hard and earnest worker and had held offices in the church. Both he and Mrs. Bacon were members of the Christian church until some time after the organization of the Congregational church when they became members of that denomination. He has always been a home man and has not belonged to clubs or societies other than the Masonic fraternity and University Club of which he was at one time president.
He has two sisters, Mrs. Mary Moore of Arcola and Mrs. Anna McWilliams of Bourbon, three half sisters, Mrs. Gertrude Jones of Bourbon, Mrs. B.C. Henry of Decatur and Miss Belle Chandler of Bourbon, two half brothers, William B.Chandler of Tacoma,Wash. and E. M.Chandler of Peoria.
Captain and Mrs.Bacon had one son, George Richard Bacon who died when he was eight years old. He would have been twenty nine years old now had he lived.
Captain Bacons mother, Mrs. Lemuel Chandler, died in September, 1910. She was an exceptional woman, strong in mind and body, courageous resourceful and Captain Bacon inherited her traits.

Obitary furnished by Janet Donner This obituary was so long that part of it is left out.



Bio by: janet donner


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  • Created by: Jim Wierman
  • Added: 18 Sep 2009
  • Find A Grave Memorial 42095842
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for George Robert Bacon (28 Sep 1845–17 Dec 1911), Find A Grave Memorial no. 42095842, citing Greenwood Cemetery, Decatur, Macon County, Illinois, USA ; Maintained by Jim Wierman (contributor 47092726) .