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 John Baptist Inman

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John Baptist Inman Veteran

Birth
Westfield Center, Medina County, Ohio, USA
Death
15 Dec 1929 (aged 81)
Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois, USA
Burial
Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois, USA
Plot
Block 32, 154
Memorial ID
41644607 View Source

Capt. John Baptist Inman, past grand commander of the G. A. R., died at his home, South State street, yesterday afternoon at the age of 81 years. Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at First Methodist church. Interment will be in Oak Ridge cemetery. Military and Masonic rites will accompany the services.

The most signal honor that came to him during his long period of service was awarded September 2, 1925, when he was elected commander of the department of Illinois Grand Army of the Republic, which office he filled in 1899-1900. In addition to his military honors he was widely known in Masonic and church circles and for twenty-five years was local manager of the Western Telegraph company in charge of the legislative business of the company for Illinois. He retired from the Western Union February 1, 1916, and since had devoted his time to the advancement of many civic projects and also continued his interest in military affairs.

Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Leeura C. Inman, and three children by a former marriage, Everett Inman, living in Minnesota; James M. Inman, of Arizona, and Mrs. Ada Shaw, of North Dakota.

Captain Inman was born in Westfield, Medina county, Ohio, Oct. 31, 1848, and removed with his parents to Minnesota in 1856. As a boy he experienced the hardships and privations of frontier life as the great west was being slowly opened and worked as a farmer, lumberman, hunter and trapper and when the railroads, the advance guard of a more modern civilization came, he served as telegrapher and train agent.

The continuation of this life on the frontiers was interrupted by the Civil war. Young Inman's father enlisted in 1861, and the son tried to follow his example, but was rejected because of his age. During the Indian massacre of 1862 he was finally accepted in a home guard company and later became a drummer boy in the First Minnesota heavy artillery company in the Civil war and served the last year of that conflict.

When the Spanish-American war broke out he was chief signal officer of the Illinois National Guard and President McKinley appointed him a captain in the Illinois Signal corps, officially known as the Seventh company, United States Volunteer Signal corps. He recruited the company and served with it in the Porto Rican campaign under Gen. Nelson A. Miles. For eight consecutive years Captain Inman was selected by the Illinois delegations to membership in the National Council of Administration of the Grand Army of the Republic, and was appointed a member of the executive committee by nine consecutive commanders in chief.

He served as department commander of the Illinois Grand Army of the Republic and was a candidate for national commander in chief of the order at the Boston grand encampment. Captain Inman was an active member of the First Methodist church, and belonged to Springfield Lodge No. 4, A. F. & A. M., the Royal Arch chapter and council. He was also a member of Elwood commandery No. 6. - IL State Journal, Springfield, IL 12-16-1929

Capt. John Baptist Inman, past grand commander of the G. A. R., died at his home, South State street, yesterday afternoon at the age of 81 years. Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at First Methodist church. Interment will be in Oak Ridge cemetery. Military and Masonic rites will accompany the services.

The most signal honor that came to him during his long period of service was awarded September 2, 1925, when he was elected commander of the department of Illinois Grand Army of the Republic, which office he filled in 1899-1900. In addition to his military honors he was widely known in Masonic and church circles and for twenty-five years was local manager of the Western Telegraph company in charge of the legislative business of the company for Illinois. He retired from the Western Union February 1, 1916, and since had devoted his time to the advancement of many civic projects and also continued his interest in military affairs.

Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Leeura C. Inman, and three children by a former marriage, Everett Inman, living in Minnesota; James M. Inman, of Arizona, and Mrs. Ada Shaw, of North Dakota.

Captain Inman was born in Westfield, Medina county, Ohio, Oct. 31, 1848, and removed with his parents to Minnesota in 1856. As a boy he experienced the hardships and privations of frontier life as the great west was being slowly opened and worked as a farmer, lumberman, hunter and trapper and when the railroads, the advance guard of a more modern civilization came, he served as telegrapher and train agent.

The continuation of this life on the frontiers was interrupted by the Civil war. Young Inman's father enlisted in 1861, and the son tried to follow his example, but was rejected because of his age. During the Indian massacre of 1862 he was finally accepted in a home guard company and later became a drummer boy in the First Minnesota heavy artillery company in the Civil war and served the last year of that conflict.

When the Spanish-American war broke out he was chief signal officer of the Illinois National Guard and President McKinley appointed him a captain in the Illinois Signal corps, officially known as the Seventh company, United States Volunteer Signal corps. He recruited the company and served with it in the Porto Rican campaign under Gen. Nelson A. Miles. For eight consecutive years Captain Inman was selected by the Illinois delegations to membership in the National Council of Administration of the Grand Army of the Republic, and was appointed a member of the executive committee by nine consecutive commanders in chief.

He served as department commander of the Illinois Grand Army of the Republic and was a candidate for national commander in chief of the order at the Boston grand encampment. Captain Inman was an active member of the First Methodist church, and belonged to Springfield Lodge No. 4, A. F. & A. M., the Royal Arch chapter and council. He was also a member of Elwood commandery No. 6. - IL State Journal, Springfield, IL 12-16-1929


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