Advertisement

 Alfred Hermann Fried

Advertisement

Alfred Hermann Fried

Birth
Vienna (Wien), Austria
Death 4 May 1921 (aged 56)
Vienna (Wien), Austria
Burial Vienna, Wien Stadt, Vienna (Wien), Austria
Memorial ID 41600563 View Source
Suggest Edits

Nobel Peace Prize Recipient. Alfred Hermann Fried received world-wide recognition after receiving the 1911 Nobel Peace Prize, as an Austrian-born journalist and, according to the Nobel Prize committee, for being the “founder of 'Die Friedenswarte,' a German peace publication.” The publication's name in English was “The Peace Watch.” He jointly shared one half of the Nobel Peace Prize with Dutchman, Tobias Asser. Born into a large Jewish family, his parents were Samuel and Bertha Fried. Although he loved books and learning, he left school at fifteen for a position in a book store. Moving to Germany, he opened his own printing press in 1887 in Berlin. Guided by 1905 Nobel Peace Prize recipient, Baroness Bertha von Suttner, Fried became interested in the peace movement, founding the German Peace Society in 1892 and from 1894 to 1899, editing a major publication, the “Monthly Peace Correspondence.” Using the title of von Suttner's book, “Lay Down Your Arms,” he boldly started a peace journal, which was replaced with “The Peace Watch,” which 1933 Nobel Peace Prize recipient, Sir Norman Angell, called “the most efficient periodical of the Pacifist movement in the world.” His audience was the educated. Advocating for an international peace organization, he was a member of the Bern Peace Bureau and Secretary of the International Coalition of Central Europe. After the first Hague Peace Conference in 1899 and the Pan-American movement , he revised his philosophy of pacifism to emphasized economic and political cooperation to further the cause of peace over than limiting arms and emphasizing international justice, and it was at that point he started the publication of “The Peace Watch.” In 1905 he started the “Yearbook of International Life “ to promote international co-operation for the goal of world peace. His efforts were partly responsible for the founding of the Society for International Understanding in 1911. With thinking inline with socialism, he wanted to rid countries of national patriotism for internationalism, yet before World War I, he defended Willhem II's positive traits in the French, English and American press. Being at the deathbed of his beloved friend, Baroness Bertha von Suttner, on June 2, 1914, he was in Vienna when World War I started. He wrote her obituary. Accused of treason by the Austrian government, he was unable to return to Vienna until the war's end. During World War I, he escaped the war in Germany to live in Switzerland where his writing would not be censored. He knew that his writings needed to be published in the mainstream press as he was literary “preaching to the converted.” He continued publishing “The Peace Watch” and helping refugees and prisoners of war. He had become a prolific author of at least 70 publications including reports, editorials, essays, pamphlets, and books. Later after the war, he returned to Vienna and published “My War Journal.” Many sources state he did not support the Treaty of Versailles. With the collapse of the Austria-Hungarian Empire after World War I, he loss everything. Facing with outright hostility from the public, he was homeless in poverty and gone into obscurity. At the young age of 57, he died of pneumonia in a hospital with his remains being cremated. “The Peace Watch” was continued to be published by the founder of Pacifistic International Law, Han Wehberg, who moved it to Zurich in 1933, remaining the editor until his death in 1962, while other said it stop during World War II. Others have continued his work even into the 21st century, for example “The Peace Journalist.” Several of his books are still available published in German; “A Brief Outline of the Nature and Aims of Pacifism” has been translated into English. He married three times : Gertrude Gnadenfeld in 1889; Martha Hollender, and Teresa von Folandt in 1908, but never had children. Although some sources refer to him as “Dr. Alfred Fried,” there is no documentation that he had a formal education to obtain a doctorate degree, yet in 1913 was given an honorary doctorate degree from Leiden University, stating in the presentation that Fried was self-taught. An Austrian postage stamp was issued in 1989 in honor of Alfred Hermann Fried.

Bio by: Linda Davis

Flowers

In their memory
Plant Memorial Trees

Advertisement

Advertisement

How famous was Alfred Hermann Fried?

Current rating:

Not enough votes to rank yet. (5 of 10)

Sign-in to cast your vote.

  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Rik Van Beveren
  • Added: 5 Sep 2009
  • Find a Grave Memorial 41600563
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/41600563/alfred_hermann-fried : accessed ), memorial page for Alfred Hermann Fried (11 Nov 1864–4 May 1921), Find a Grave Memorial ID 41600563, citing Friedhof Feuerhalle-Simmering, Vienna, Wien Stadt, Vienna (Wien), Austria ; Maintained by Find a Grave .