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 Bushrod Washington Frobel

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Bushrod Washington Frobel

Birth
Alexandria, Alexandria City, Virginia, USA
Death 13 Jul 1888 (aged 55–56)
Monticello, Jasper County, Georgia, USA
Burial Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia, USA
Memorial ID 40666768 View Source
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Inscription

Provisional Army CSA

Colonel, Rail Road Executive, Confederate Artillery Commander, Civil Engineer, and Railroad Manager - his name was Col. Bushrod Washington Frobel, CSA.
He was the son of John Jacob Frobel (1772-1846) and Mary Scott Marshall of Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, Netherlands on the same street in Alexandria City, Virginia as George Washington's home. They were friends and neighbors of George and Mary. George and Martha Washington met John Jacob Frobel as a young boy after one of his musical performances in New York City in 1789. Impressed with his talent, the Washington's encouraged Frobel to move to Mount Vernon.
It wasn't until 1804 that John Jacob moved to Mt. Vernon to teach music to the nieces and nephews of Judge Bushrod and Anne Washington. Judge Bushrod Washington, the nephew of George, inherited Mount Vernon after Washington's death in 1799. John Jacob (the Col. father) lived at Mount Vernon until 1809 when he moved to his "Wilton Hill".
The earliest recorded history of the Allgood road property begins on June 4, 1863 when Milton Turk sold 200 acres to Dr. William Elliot Dunwody. The Dunwody's were a prominent family, associated with the Roswell Woolen Mills, in Roswell, then in Cobb County and east of Marietta. They resided in Roswell until 1848, when they built "Welham" on Canton Road in Marietta.
From the original 200 acres, Dr. Dunwody sold 80 acres on December 24, 1868 to Colonel Bushrod Washington Frobel. D. S. Malone, a local "mechanic," constructed a brick and stone home at a cost of $1100. According to a mechanic's lien, the house was completed on August 16, 1869. Colonel Frobel's military career is chronicled in the Official Records of the War of the Rebellion. He rose from the rank of Captain to Colonel, and became the Chief Engineer of Hood's Army of Tennessee where he worked on the defensive fortifications surrounding Atlanta.
After the Civil War (1861-1865), he wrote a series of articles between 1866-69 entitled "Field and Camp," recounting his Civil War experiences for Scott's Monthly Magazine. He also began a distinguished career as the Superintendent of Public Buildings and Works for the state of Georgia while the capital was still in Milledgeville. He supervised the post-Civil War reconstruction of the capitol, Governor's Mansion, penitentiary, and mental asylum in Milledgeville at a cost of a half-million dollars. The state capital was moved to Atlanta in 1868, thus bringing Frobel to metro-Atlanta and therefor

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