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 Francis “Frank” Smith (Perry)

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Francis “Frank” Smith (Perry)

Birth
Azores Region, Portugal
Death 17 Sep 1918 (aged 82–83)
Provincetown, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, USA
Burial Provincetown, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, USA
Memorial ID 40620646 View Source
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Provincetown Advocate-September 19, 1918-page 2
Death of Francis P. Smith-Former Proprietor of the Atlantic House
Frank P. Smith is dead. The end came early Tuesday, at No. 22 Pearl Street, where the deceased and family had resided since retiring, in 1915, to private life after some 45 years of hotel-keeping.
Born on the island of Pico, Azores, in 1835, Francis Perry Smith came to Provincetown on the whaling schooner Charles Allstrum, Captain Seth Snow, in 1850. In the following year he fell sick while on the Provincetown whaler Antaretic and was landed on Flores, Azores, where he remained a twelve-month, then shipped on the Provincetown whaling bark Spartan, Captain Josiah Cook, spent two years on that locally famous craft and returned to Provincetown-to stay-at the voyage end.
Residing in the family of Captain Seth Snow when ashore previous to his marriage, he put in many consecutive years at sea, as steward most of the time, in vessels of all manner of rigs and trade.
He spent a part of 1851 macheral 'hooking' in the Bay Chaleur on the Susan Ripley and later sailed on mackerel0catching craft and the square-riggers Victory and Nellie Austin of Black Ball Line fame.
During the Civil War he was long on a steamer, government chartered, which carried troops between Boston, Newport News and Ship Island. And he sailed on steamships Star of the Union, General Grant, Cambria, Manhattan, Eagle, Moro Castle and the gunboat-transport McClellan.
He was on the steamer Ella Walder when she was run down and sunk 50 miles off Barnegat, by the steamer North Star. The boat in which he escaped from the Walder was only a ship's lengh from that vessels' side when she went down, carrying all the engineers and firemen who were on duty when the North Star's penetrating stem heaped the entrance to the engine and fire rooms with wreckage.
He was on the John M. Fiske, on Georges' Bank in the memorable gale of August, 1870, and it has been asserted by his shipmates of that voyage that the escape of vessel and crew was principally due to his gallant efforts.
In 1871 he forsook the sea, purchased the Allstrum House, renamed it Atlantic House, and thereafter there conducted an all-year-round hostelry, beocming increasingly, and favorably, known yearly to the travelling public. Thousands of guests praised his bill of fare0always abundant and delectable, listened with delight to his tales of the sea and experiences in foreign climes, applauded his aphorisms and came to admire his genial manner and big-souled hospitality. Big-souled? He probably fed more impecunious persons than any small-town landlord in New England-in most instances without solicitation. But, although he was prodigal in food and lodging dispensing to financially embarrassed ones and was an over generous contributor to public and private charties throughout his landlordship, it was not because he had failed to make money at the business (for he enjoyed very liberal patronage throughout his hotel-keeping), but the growing infirmities of age that were responsible for his retirement not so long ago.
Formerly a familiar figure upon the town's streets, he was confined to the Pearl Street home by growing weakness most of the time during the past year or so, but his interest in the town and its people suffered no abatement. He retain his love for the town of his adoption until the end, and all Provincetown mourns the flight of the spirit of Landlord "Frank," whose worth they knew and appreciated. He leaves a wife, four daughters and two sons to cherish his memory. Funeral services are to occur from the Odd Fellows' Hall at 2 p.m., Friday, the Rev. William Henry Rider officiating.


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