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Rev Lemuel Haynes

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Rev Lemuel Haynes Famous memorial Veteran

Birth
West Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA
Death
28 Sep 1833 (aged 80)
South Granville, Washington County, New York, USA
Burial
South Granville, Washington County, New York, USA GPS-Latitude: 43.3820288, Longitude: -73.27543
Memorial ID
View Source
Religious Figure. He was a pioneer African-American clergyman. The child of an African father and a white woman, at five-months-old he became an indentured servant to a family in Middle Granville, Massachusetts. After learning to read, Haynes developed a passion for theology, and began conducting church services at the town parish. In 1774 he enlisted in the local militia, and in 1776 his unit garrisoned recently-captured Fort Ticonderoga. During his service, he wrote a well-received ballad about the Battle of Lexington, which was notable because it emphasized the conflict between slavery and the quest for freedom that was the supposed cause of the Revolution. After his militia service, he studied with clergymen in Connecticut. In 1780 he was licensed to preach and accepted a position in Middle Granville, where he met and married Elizabeth Babbitt, a white schoolteacher. In 1785, Haynes received his ordination as a Congregational minister, the first African-American clergyman in America, and became a pastor in Torrington, Connecticut. He left after two years for the pastorate in Rutland, Vermont, where he remained for the next 30 years. He developed an international reputation as a preacher and writer, arguing on moral grounds for an immediate end to slavery in opposition to proponents of gradual emancipation. In 1804, Haynes became the first African-American to receive an honorary degree when Middlebury College presented him with a Master of Arts diploma. In 1822 he left Rutland for a church in South Granville, New York, where he preached until his death. His home in South Granville is a National Historic Landmark, and a United Church of Christ in Queens, New York is named in honor of him.
Religious Figure. He was a pioneer African-American clergyman. The child of an African father and a white woman, at five-months-old he became an indentured servant to a family in Middle Granville, Massachusetts. After learning to read, Haynes developed a passion for theology, and began conducting church services at the town parish. In 1774 he enlisted in the local militia, and in 1776 his unit garrisoned recently-captured Fort Ticonderoga. During his service, he wrote a well-received ballad about the Battle of Lexington, which was notable because it emphasized the conflict between slavery and the quest for freedom that was the supposed cause of the Revolution. After his militia service, he studied with clergymen in Connecticut. In 1780 he was licensed to preach and accepted a position in Middle Granville, where he met and married Elizabeth Babbitt, a white schoolteacher. In 1785, Haynes received his ordination as a Congregational minister, the first African-American clergyman in America, and became a pastor in Torrington, Connecticut. He left after two years for the pastorate in Rutland, Vermont, where he remained for the next 30 years. He developed an international reputation as a preacher and writer, arguing on moral grounds for an immediate end to slavery in opposition to proponents of gradual emancipation. In 1804, Haynes became the first African-American to receive an honorary degree when Middlebury College presented him with a Master of Arts diploma. In 1822 he left Rutland for a church in South Granville, New York, where he preached until his death. His home in South Granville is a National Historic Landmark, and a United Church of Christ in Queens, New York is named in honor of him.

Bio by: Bill McKern


Inscription

Here lies the dust of a poor hell-deserving sinner who ventured into eternity trusting wholly on the merits of Christ for salvation. In the full belief of the great doctrines he preached while on earth, he invites his children, and all who read this, to trust their eternal interest in the same foundation.



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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Bill McKern
  • Added: Jul 25, 2009
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/39855279/lemuel-haynes: accessed ), memorial page for Rev Lemuel Haynes (18 Jul 1753–28 Sep 1833), Find a Grave Memorial ID 39855279, citing Lee-Oatman Cemetery, South Granville, Washington County, New York, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave.