Mathias M “Matt” Lauerman

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Mathias M “Matt” Lauerman

Birth
Cedar Lake, Lake County, Indiana, USA
Death
6 Jan 1939 (aged 83)
Hammond, Lake County, Indiana, USA
Burial
Cedar Lake, Lake County, Indiana, USA GPS-Latitude: 41.3786972, Longitude: -87.4674611
Memorial ID
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Matt Lauerman was a true entrepreneur, embarking on many business ventures. He was part of a movement of Lake County German families to Chariton County, Missouri, which began in the 1870s, traveling to that rather remote area, about 70 miles west of Hannibal, Missouri, to farm in company with his wife's relatives and other countrymen.

After the loss of his first-born son and what is a very plausible family legend of his wife's being lost overnight in the wild Missouri woods after searching for their missing cow, his native Lake County called him back to the Cedar Lake area, where he established a general store, became postmaster, and eventually retired, leaving his grocery enterprises to the able care of his sons. In his later years he divided his time among his children, having been widowed in 1924, and he passed away in his sleep at St. Anne's convalescent home on Columbia Avenue in Hammond, having spent his final night in the company of his brother, Michael, a prominent Calumet City resident.
Matt Lauerman was a true entrepreneur, embarking on many business ventures. He was part of a movement of Lake County German families to Chariton County, Missouri, which began in the 1870s, traveling to that rather remote area, about 70 miles west of Hannibal, Missouri, to farm in company with his wife's relatives and other countrymen.

After the loss of his first-born son and what is a very plausible family legend of his wife's being lost overnight in the wild Missouri woods after searching for their missing cow, his native Lake County called him back to the Cedar Lake area, where he established a general store, became postmaster, and eventually retired, leaving his grocery enterprises to the able care of his sons. In his later years he divided his time among his children, having been widowed in 1924, and he passed away in his sleep at St. Anne's convalescent home on Columbia Avenue in Hammond, having spent his final night in the company of his brother, Michael, a prominent Calumet City resident.