The Photo Request has been fulfilled.

Rev Wellborn Mooney

Photo added by Bryan Ainsworth Mooney

Rev Wellborn Mooney

  • Birth 23 Dec 1829 Fauquier County, Virginia, USA
  • Death 5 Oct 1907 Dresden, Weakley County, Tennessee, USA
  • Burial Dresden, Weakley County, Tennessee, USA
  • Memorial ID 36713445

He was appointed missionary chaplain to the Army of Tennessee by Bishop Pierce.

Mooney, Wellborn, Rev.
On October 5, 1907, another veteran, tried and true, closed the long life march. Rev. Wellborn Mooney, son of William S. Mooney and Emily Kincheloe, was born in Fauquier County, Va., near Manassas, December 23, 1829. In early childhood he went with his parents from Virginia to Alabama, and from there to Tennessee, in which State most of his long and useful life was spent. In the fall of 1849 he joined the Tennessee Conference, in session at Shelbyville. Tenn., and for thirty years he served in that body on circuits, at stations, and as presiding elder. He was twice a delegate to the General Conference, and was for three years in the St. Louis Conference as pastor at Cape Girardeau and at Washington. The last seventeen years of his life he was a highly honored and much loved member of the Memphis Conference, making his home at Dresden, Tenn., where for years his wife was engaged in educational work. Here the conflict ceased, and he laid his armor by. He was widely and well known in Church and State, and made a fine record, as hundreds of testimonials evidence, in the Confederate service. Rev. W. Mooney's work as missionary chaplain in the Army of Tennessee under the department of Bishop Pierce is that which deserves special prominence herein. The fall of Fort Donelson found him pastor of the Methodist Church in Pulaski, Tenn. To this place the Nashville hospitals were removed, to Giles College, on historic East Hill, where Sam Davis was executed. It was hastily fitted to receive our sick soldiers. To these Mr. Mooney ministered daily until the order was given for the removal of the hospitals farther South. The tide of invasion soon followed, with all the ills incident thereto. The State was under military law, and sympathizers with the South were compelled to take the "ironclad oath" or leave on short notice. Arrests were the order of the day, including representative citizens of the pulpit, the bar, and other departments of business. Twelve were arrested in Pulaski and ordered South under military escort by Major Munday. They were landed across the Tennessee River. Mr. Mooney, Drs. Sumpter and Abernathy, and Booker Shapard, an aged citizen, were among those thus summarily sent from Pulaski, going they knew not whither. Bishop Andrew, learning of the situation, appointed Mr. Mooney to the Marion Station, Alabama Conference, for the remainder of that Conference year. Meantime the Tennessee Conference had met in October at Cornersville, Tenn., Dr. J. B. McFerrin presiding in the absence of a bishop, and Mr. Mooney was appointed to the Athens Station. Word reached him about the time of the meeting of the Alabama Conference, and he went at once to his work at Athens, where he remained till the threatened in vestment of the town by the Federals. He again crossed the Tennessee River and was appointed missionary chaplain to the Army of Tennessee, and there he labored in camp, in hospital, along the march till the end, when he returned to his chosen calling, the work of an itinerant Methodist preacher. He was Clerk, or Secretary, of the Confederate Chaplains' Association of the Army of Tennessee, and Mrs. Mooney prizes beyond price the minutes with the names of heroes who wore the gray, most of whom have answered to the last roll. From survivors she has had many assurances of the affectionate regard in which they hold her husband for his work as missionary chaplain in that army. One of these letters from "one of the Mississippi boys," believing that it will be read with interest by all comrades, is given to the VETERAN : Mrs. Sue F. Mooney, Dresden, Tenn.: I have read with keen interest many times mention of your husband and his work, and often thought of writing to him, and would most assuredly have done so but for the reason that I thought he would scarcely have any recollection of me, and the other thought that many more competent would write thanking him for his arduous labors and faithful work as missionary chaplain in the Army of Tennessee. I belonged to the 32nd and 45th Mississippi Regiments, consolidated, under Brig. Gen. M. P. Lowrey, who was himself a minister of the Baptist denomination, and was also greatly admired by us boys for his sterling qualities. Brother Mooney used to associate himself with General Lowrey, and we saw much of him on the march. He would often walk that he might let a sick or barefooted man ride his horse. Often when we would halt only for a short time he would gather the boys and hold service. I remember several of his texts 1 Timothy 1. 15, 1 Corinthians xvi. 13 especially for impressions made on my heart. He used to preach for Granbury's Brigade (Texans). They claimed that he was their preacher. I often wonder if they remember him as I do."-notonfag



Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

  • Created by: Melissa Clayton Key
  • Added: 4 May 2009
  • Find A Grave Memorial 36713445
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Rev Wellborn Mooney (23 Dec 1829–5 Oct 1907), Find A Grave Memorial no. 36713445, citing Sunset Cemetery, Dresden, Weakley County, Tennessee, USA ; Maintained by Melissa Clayton Key (contributor 46868985) .