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 Daniel Gabriel Wayne

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Daniel Gabriel Wayne

Birth
Charleston County, South Carolina, USA
Death
18 Mar 1901 (aged 83)
Mount Pleasant, Charleston County, South Carolina, USA
Burial
Charleston, Charleston County, South Carolina, USA
Memorial ID
36642767 View Source

OBITUARY OF MR. DANIEL G. WAYNE, SR.
Death of Venerable Citizen who was Long identified with Charleston, [South Carolina]. He was the Last Surviving Pallbearer of Calhoun.
Mr. Daniel G. Wayne, Sr. died yesterday at the residence of his son-in-law, Mr. George F. Von Kolnitz, at Mount Pleasant, in sight of the city in which he was born, and to which he devoted his talents and his life. He was for many years connected with the city’s interests. Born in Charleston, he passed a few years of his youth in Georgetown, and then returned to his birthplace and took up the duties of manhood. For many years he was recognized as one of the city’s leading architects and contractors, and many of the handsome residences which add to the beauty of the city, were the creation of his talent and skill. When the State seceded from the Union he was found among those who rallied to the Lost /Cause, and as the captain of the Marion Rifles, 27th South Carolina regiment, he ably discharged his duty as a citizens and a soldier. Subsequently he was transferred to the transportation department and had charge of the movement of the trains for soldiers and supplies, and as Capt. Wayne he won the love and esteem of those who served with him. His social and charitable nature made him a favorite in the various societies of which he was a member. He had the gift of graceful speech, and he was often called on to respond to various toasts and to deliver addresses at the annual reunions of the organizations with which he was connected. He was the president of the German Friendly Society in 1857 and 1858, and a member of the Fellowship Society, and also the South Carolina Society until the last year or two, when his increased feebleness and age prevented his further attendance. Possessed of a charitable and generous disposition, his hands were always ready to supplement with his means the wants of the needy and unfortunate.
He was one of the founders of St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church, and served for many years as a member of the vestry and church council, and his funeral services will be held at the church he had done so much to prosper and maintain. Mr. Wayne was born on the 30th day of June, 1817, and was thrice married. His first wife was Miss Mary E. Kingman, and of this union but one child survives him, Mrs. George F. Von Kolnitz. His second wife was Miss Julia Ward, and of his marriage three sons survive, Mr. D. G. Wayne, Jr., Mr. William O. Wayne and Mr. A. T. Wayne. This third wife was Miss Mary Motte Ward, who died eleven years ago, since which time he has made his home with this eldest daughter.
While in no sense a politician he was always ready to discharge his duty as a citizen, and served during Mayor Courtenay’s administration was a member of the board of health. He was the last surviving pallbearer of John C. Calhoun, and has often spoken of the esteem and veneration with which he regarded the great statesman. By his death another landmark has been removed, but his children and grandchildren and great-grandchildren will have to lessen the grief his death has caused the knowledge that he lived a life of noble Christian manhood and was true to every call of duty as citizen, soldier and patriarch, and having passed the limit of four score years, at last laid down to rest, “Secure in the promise of the dawn of a never ending story.”

OBITUARY OF MR. DANIEL G. WAYNE, SR.
Death of Venerable Citizen who was Long identified with Charleston, [South Carolina]. He was the Last Surviving Pallbearer of Calhoun.
Mr. Daniel G. Wayne, Sr. died yesterday at the residence of his son-in-law, Mr. George F. Von Kolnitz, at Mount Pleasant, in sight of the city in which he was born, and to which he devoted his talents and his life. He was for many years connected with the city’s interests. Born in Charleston, he passed a few years of his youth in Georgetown, and then returned to his birthplace and took up the duties of manhood. For many years he was recognized as one of the city’s leading architects and contractors, and many of the handsome residences which add to the beauty of the city, were the creation of his talent and skill. When the State seceded from the Union he was found among those who rallied to the Lost /Cause, and as the captain of the Marion Rifles, 27th South Carolina regiment, he ably discharged his duty as a citizens and a soldier. Subsequently he was transferred to the transportation department and had charge of the movement of the trains for soldiers and supplies, and as Capt. Wayne he won the love and esteem of those who served with him. His social and charitable nature made him a favorite in the various societies of which he was a member. He had the gift of graceful speech, and he was often called on to respond to various toasts and to deliver addresses at the annual reunions of the organizations with which he was connected. He was the president of the German Friendly Society in 1857 and 1858, and a member of the Fellowship Society, and also the South Carolina Society until the last year or two, when his increased feebleness and age prevented his further attendance. Possessed of a charitable and generous disposition, his hands were always ready to supplement with his means the wants of the needy and unfortunate.
He was one of the founders of St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church, and served for many years as a member of the vestry and church council, and his funeral services will be held at the church he had done so much to prosper and maintain. Mr. Wayne was born on the 30th day of June, 1817, and was thrice married. His first wife was Miss Mary E. Kingman, and of this union but one child survives him, Mrs. George F. Von Kolnitz. His second wife was Miss Julia Ward, and of his marriage three sons survive, Mr. D. G. Wayne, Jr., Mr. William O. Wayne and Mr. A. T. Wayne. This third wife was Miss Mary Motte Ward, who died eleven years ago, since which time he has made his home with this eldest daughter.
While in no sense a politician he was always ready to discharge his duty as a citizen, and served during Mayor Courtenay’s administration was a member of the board of health. He was the last surviving pallbearer of John C. Calhoun, and has often spoken of the esteem and veneration with which he regarded the great statesman. By his death another landmark has been removed, but his children and grandchildren and great-grandchildren will have to lessen the grief his death has caused the knowledge that he lived a life of noble Christian manhood and was true to every call of duty as citizen, soldier and patriarch, and having passed the limit of four score years, at last laid down to rest, “Secure in the promise of the dawn of a never ending story.”


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