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Louis Patrick Aloe

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Louis Patrick Aloe

Birth
St. Louis City, Missouri, USA
Death
12 Jan 1929 (aged 61)
Saint Louis, St. Louis City, Missouri, USA
Burial
Affton, St. Louis County, Missouri, USA Add to Map
Plot
4,36
Memorial ID
View Source
AS ONE of the leading businessmen of St. Louis and as a prominent figure in both civic and state politics, Louis P. Aloe is equally well known. Connected with one of the largest manufacturing establishments of optical goods in the country, his business has long been foremost among the industries of the Mound City.

Not only is Mr. Aloe earnest in his work for the Republican party, with which he is affiliated, but he has also taken a leading part in numerous enterprises designed to benefit the city and to beautify its surroundings. He has shown the greatest enthusiasm over various public movements, which would result in betterment of the city, and has held several important positions in such bodies and leagues as promoted these movements.

For the term of his connection with politics he has represented the Republican party in its local clubs and has held numerous offices in political organizations. He has always been a foremost worker for the principles of his party and is acknowledged to be a power in this branch of politics.

Mr. Aloe was born in this city thirty-seven years ago and was educated at Washington University. He finished his course with high honors and took position immediately in the manufacturing concern of his father, the late Albert S. Aloe. The latter died in this city in 1893, and his connection with the business his sons now represent has made the name for many years a well known title in St. Louis.

Louis Aloe has been a leading figure in local fraternal affairs. Socially and in a business way the Aloe family has always been popular, and it has become one of the most important in the city's industrial life by reason of the magnitude of the concern it represents.
--The Makers of St. Louis: A Brief Sketch of the Growth of a Great City, with Biographies of the Men Whose Lives Have Been Given to the Building Up of a Mid-continent Metropolis, 1906
__________________________________
ALOE, Louis P., merchant in optical goods; born St. Louis, July 20, 1867; son of A. S. and Isabella Hill Aloe; educated at Stoddard School, Wyman Institute and Washington University; married, St. Louis, February, 1897, Edith Rosenblatt; children, Clara Belle, Viola, Louise Isabelle. Engaged in optical business from 1883, now president A. S. Aloe Co., opticians. President Nat. Assn. of Surgical and Optical Dealers. Republican. Secretary Young Republican Association of Missouri; member Republican State Executive Committee; member Board of Election Commissioners of St. Louis. Club: Merchants' League (president). Office: 513 Olive St. Residence: 4535 Maryland Ave.
--The Book of St. Louisans: A biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men of the City of St. Louis and Vicinity, 1912
__________________________________
Louis Aloe was the son of Albert, founder of the A.S. Aloe Company, a manufacturer of surgical instruments, optical equipment and photographic supplies.

From 1915 to 1923, Louis Aloe served as president of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen. He emerged as a hero after the East St. Louis riot in 1917. The labor- and race-related violence caused deaths and extensive property damage. More than 300 homes and businesses were burned. The local investigation was inept, so it’s hard to know the full scope of the carnage. The official death count was 39 blacks and nine whites, but the toll probably was closer to 100. Is has been described as one of the worst race riots in U.S. history.

During the riot, the East St. Louis Mayor cowered in his office during the carnage and the Illinois National Guard Colonial found time to step out for lunch. Thousands of blacks fled to St. Louis, where Aloe was filling in for Mayor Henry Kiel. Aloe opened the city's Municipal Lodging House, a homeless shelter across 12th Street (Tucker Boulevard) from City Hall, and approved emergency spending for food.

For the next week, the Lodging House provided overnight shelter to about 700 men, women and children, and fed more than 7,500. The local Red Cross assisted. Refugees, including at least one man with a gunshot wound in his back, were treated at City Hospital.

In 1923, Aloe was a driving force in an $87 million city bond issue that included money for clearing land along Market Street. He is namesake of Aloe Plaza, across from Union Station. His widow, Edith, donated money for the "Meeting of the Waters" fountain.
--information from St. Louis Post-Dispatch; Sept. 21, 2014
__________________________
Louis and his wife had four children, all girls: Clara, Viola, and Louise (Patricia) and Isabel (twins).
AS ONE of the leading businessmen of St. Louis and as a prominent figure in both civic and state politics, Louis P. Aloe is equally well known. Connected with one of the largest manufacturing establishments of optical goods in the country, his business has long been foremost among the industries of the Mound City.

Not only is Mr. Aloe earnest in his work for the Republican party, with which he is affiliated, but he has also taken a leading part in numerous enterprises designed to benefit the city and to beautify its surroundings. He has shown the greatest enthusiasm over various public movements, which would result in betterment of the city, and has held several important positions in such bodies and leagues as promoted these movements.

For the term of his connection with politics he has represented the Republican party in its local clubs and has held numerous offices in political organizations. He has always been a foremost worker for the principles of his party and is acknowledged to be a power in this branch of politics.

Mr. Aloe was born in this city thirty-seven years ago and was educated at Washington University. He finished his course with high honors and took position immediately in the manufacturing concern of his father, the late Albert S. Aloe. The latter died in this city in 1893, and his connection with the business his sons now represent has made the name for many years a well known title in St. Louis.

Louis Aloe has been a leading figure in local fraternal affairs. Socially and in a business way the Aloe family has always been popular, and it has become one of the most important in the city's industrial life by reason of the magnitude of the concern it represents.
--The Makers of St. Louis: A Brief Sketch of the Growth of a Great City, with Biographies of the Men Whose Lives Have Been Given to the Building Up of a Mid-continent Metropolis, 1906
__________________________________
ALOE, Louis P., merchant in optical goods; born St. Louis, July 20, 1867; son of A. S. and Isabella Hill Aloe; educated at Stoddard School, Wyman Institute and Washington University; married, St. Louis, February, 1897, Edith Rosenblatt; children, Clara Belle, Viola, Louise Isabelle. Engaged in optical business from 1883, now president A. S. Aloe Co., opticians. President Nat. Assn. of Surgical and Optical Dealers. Republican. Secretary Young Republican Association of Missouri; member Republican State Executive Committee; member Board of Election Commissioners of St. Louis. Club: Merchants' League (president). Office: 513 Olive St. Residence: 4535 Maryland Ave.
--The Book of St. Louisans: A biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men of the City of St. Louis and Vicinity, 1912
__________________________________
Louis Aloe was the son of Albert, founder of the A.S. Aloe Company, a manufacturer of surgical instruments, optical equipment and photographic supplies.

From 1915 to 1923, Louis Aloe served as president of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen. He emerged as a hero after the East St. Louis riot in 1917. The labor- and race-related violence caused deaths and extensive property damage. More than 300 homes and businesses were burned. The local investigation was inept, so it’s hard to know the full scope of the carnage. The official death count was 39 blacks and nine whites, but the toll probably was closer to 100. Is has been described as one of the worst race riots in U.S. history.

During the riot, the East St. Louis Mayor cowered in his office during the carnage and the Illinois National Guard Colonial found time to step out for lunch. Thousands of blacks fled to St. Louis, where Aloe was filling in for Mayor Henry Kiel. Aloe opened the city's Municipal Lodging House, a homeless shelter across 12th Street (Tucker Boulevard) from City Hall, and approved emergency spending for food.

For the next week, the Lodging House provided overnight shelter to about 700 men, women and children, and fed more than 7,500. The local Red Cross assisted. Refugees, including at least one man with a gunshot wound in his back, were treated at City Hospital.

In 1923, Aloe was a driving force in an $87 million city bond issue that included money for clearing land along Market Street. He is namesake of Aloe Plaza, across from Union Station. His widow, Edith, donated money for the "Meeting of the Waters" fountain.
--information from St. Louis Post-Dispatch; Sept. 21, 2014
__________________________
Louis and his wife had four children, all girls: Clara, Viola, and Louise (Patricia) and Isabel (twins).


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  • Maintained by: Katie
  • Originally Created by: 46831545
  • Added: Apr 28, 2009
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/36474467/louis_patrick-aloe: accessed ), memorial page for Louis Patrick Aloe (20 Jul 1867–12 Jan 1929), Find a Grave Memorial ID 36474467, citing New Mount Sinai Cemetery and Mausoleum, Affton, St. Louis County, Missouri, USA; Maintained by Katie (contributor 47010886).