Robert I. Robin Everett

Robert I. "Robin" Everett

Birth
England
Death
23 May 1827 (aged 76–77)
Burial
Maryville, Blount County, Tennessee, USA
Memorial ID
35475890 View Source

Husband of Margaret Cox; DAR Memorial marker was relocated in 1979 from his nearby farm to Piney Level Cemetery

Robert Everett was born Aug 10, 1750 at St. Botolph's, Leicester, England and came to the Colonies in time for fight against the British in the Revolutionary War.
He was a survivor of Waxhaw's Massacre done by the command of Col. Banastre Tarleton.

He was in Captain Adam Wallace's company of infantry of Colonel Hawes' Virginia Regiment. Later, he was also in Captain Sigismund Stribling's company under Major Smith Snead. {Robert Everett's Pension No. is S38682 and the pension packet number is 1,332-Tennessee 4. Other proof of Revolutionary Service can be found in the Feb 1977 DAR Magazine on page 150. His service is also authenticated in the Tennessee DAR Yearbook of 1940 on page 138.}
Virginia service in 1780 was very hazardous. The Continental Army was organized by state, and the Virginia troops were in the Virginia Line. Almost all Virginians serving in the Continental Army were captured in the disastrous surrender by General Benjamin Lincoln of the army at Charlestown, South Carolina in 1780. However, Captain Wallace's company with Robert Everett among them was not there. Wallace and his men were with Colonel Abraham Buford.

Colonel Abraham Buford's command consisted of between 350 and 430 men. They were reinforcements who arrived too late to help the Charleston garrison, and were caught by Banastre Tarleton's dragoons while returning to Virginia. They all became casualties as every one of them was KIA, WIA, or POW in the Massacre of Waxhaws, South Carolina. In the "Waxhaws Massacre," Tarleton's men killed over 100 while they apparently tried to surrender. In a lot fewer words, if you were a Virginian Continental in the service in 1780 you were more than likely captured at Charleston, and if you missed that you probably died at Waxhaws with Buford .

The survivors, including Robert, would find themselves in new Virginia regiments including two regiments of 18-month levies raised in December 1780 under Colonel John Green and Lt. Colonel Samuel Hawes which would eventually be named the 1st and 2d Virginia Regiments. The "new" 1st and 2d Virginia Regiments would fight with General Nathaniel Greene's army in the Carolinas at the Battle of Guilford Court House, the Siege of Ninety-Six, the Battle of Hobkirk's Hill and the Battle of Eutaw Springs. He was discharged at Salisbury, North Carolina on January 17, 1782 and his discharge was signed by Captain Stribling and Major Snead. His final pay was dated as of Dec 19, 1782.

One and a half years after his discharge, he married at the age of 33. He married Margaret Cox the widow of his friend another Revolutionary War soldier Thomas Lockhart. She had one son, Charles Lockhart, whom Robert raised as his own.

Husband of Margaret Cox; DAR Memorial marker was relocated in 1979 from his nearby farm to Piney Level Cemetery

Robert Everett was born Aug 10, 1750 at St. Botolph's, Leicester, England and came to the Colonies in time for fight against the British in the Revolutionary War.
He was a survivor of Waxhaw's Massacre done by the command of Col. Banastre Tarleton.

He was in Captain Adam Wallace's company of infantry of Colonel Hawes' Virginia Regiment. Later, he was also in Captain Sigismund Stribling's company under Major Smith Snead. {Robert Everett's Pension No. is S38682 and the pension packet number is 1,332-Tennessee 4. Other proof of Revolutionary Service can be found in the Feb 1977 DAR Magazine on page 150. His service is also authenticated in the Tennessee DAR Yearbook of 1940 on page 138.}
Virginia service in 1780 was very hazardous. The Continental Army was organized by state, and the Virginia troops were in the Virginia Line. Almost all Virginians serving in the Continental Army were captured in the disastrous surrender by General Benjamin Lincoln of the army at Charlestown, South Carolina in 1780. However, Captain Wallace's company with Robert Everett among them was not there. Wallace and his men were with Colonel Abraham Buford.

Colonel Abraham Buford's command consisted of between 350 and 430 men. They were reinforcements who arrived too late to help the Charleston garrison, and were caught by Banastre Tarleton's dragoons while returning to Virginia. They all became casualties as every one of them was KIA, WIA, or POW in the Massacre of Waxhaws, South Carolina. In the "Waxhaws Massacre," Tarleton's men killed over 100 while they apparently tried to surrender. In a lot fewer words, if you were a Virginian Continental in the service in 1780 you were more than likely captured at Charleston, and if you missed that you probably died at Waxhaws with Buford .

The survivors, including Robert, would find themselves in new Virginia regiments including two regiments of 18-month levies raised in December 1780 under Colonel John Green and Lt. Colonel Samuel Hawes which would eventually be named the 1st and 2d Virginia Regiments. The "new" 1st and 2d Virginia Regiments would fight with General Nathaniel Greene's army in the Carolinas at the Battle of Guilford Court House, the Siege of Ninety-Six, the Battle of Hobkirk's Hill and the Battle of Eutaw Springs. He was discharged at Salisbury, North Carolina on January 17, 1782 and his discharge was signed by Captain Stribling and Major Snead. His final pay was dated as of Dec 19, 1782.

One and a half years after his discharge, he married at the age of 33. He married Margaret Cox the widow of his friend another Revolutionary War soldier Thomas Lockhart. She had one son, Charles Lockhart, whom Robert raised as his own.


Inscription

Robert Everitt Col. Haw's VA. Regt. REV WAR 1750 – 1827 Buried on his farm nearby


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