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 George Pearce Andrews

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George Pearce Andrews

Birth
Connecticut, USA
Death
2 Jul 1887 (aged 65–66)
California, USA
Burial
San Francisco, San Francisco County, California, USA
Plot
Section OS Row 39 Site 5
Memorial ID
3519550 View Source

July 1, 1845 graduated from West Point (15/41) and appointed brevet 2ndlt., 3rd U. S. Artillery Rgt.
Feb. 16, 1847 2ndlt.
June 4, 1847-Oct. 24, 1848 regimental quartermaster;
Sept. 8, 1847 1stlt.
Sept. 8, 1847 wounded at and brevet capt., U. S. Army for Molino del Rey Mexico;
Sept. 13, 1847 brevet maj., U. S. Army for Chapultepec Mexico;
June 1-Oct. 12, 1858 regimental quartermaster;
Oct. 12, 1858 capt.
1862-1865 served in California;
July 28, 1866 maj., 5th U. S. Artillery Rgt.
July 1, 1880 ltcol., 4th U. S. Artillery Rgt.
Oct. 27, 1881 transferred to 1st U. S. Artillery Rgt.
Nov. 3, 1882 col., 3rd U. S. Artillery Rgt.
Nov. 4, 1882 transferred to 1st U. S. Artillery Rgt.
March 22, 1885 retired

***

NECROLOGY from the

Nineteenth Annual Reunion of the Association of Graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York June 11th, 1888

East Saginaw, Mich.

Evening News and Binding House

1888

(found on Google Books as Annual Reunion By United States Military Academy. Association of Graduates)

GEORGE P. ANDREWS
No. 1245. Class Of 1845.
Died, July 2, 1887, at Fort Winfield Scott, Cal., aged 66.

On the second ultimo there died at Fort Point, in the harbor of San Francisco, a soldier and citizen—of local and army fame scarcely commensurate with his admirable traits and gifts of character and mind; a soldier who, whilst yet a youth, won exceptional distinction on the classic fields of Mexico, but whom Fate, nevertheless, destined to bear an inactive part in a war more sanguinary and cruel, but no more brilliant with deeds of heroism and valor; a citizen who, for nigh onto forty years, had been identified by association, interest and service with the progress and development of the Golden State; and who, in the marked features of his character—virtues and failings—was a true representative of the early pioneers of California. A humorist, as keen, as brilliant, as delightful as John Phoenix (who ofttimes stole his thunder), or any of the bright essayists in wit and humor, whose creations and fancies, inspired and developed amid the golden scenes and events of California, have charmed the literary world.

George Pierce Andrews was born in the State of Connecticut, in the year 1821. His father, a physician by profession, emigrated, a few years later, to Goldsboro, North Carolina, where his children were educated, and from which State George Andrews was appointed, in 1841, to West Point. He was graduated therefrom in the class of 1845, whose roll embraces the names of William Ft. C. Whiting, William F. Smith, Thomas J. Wood. Charles P. Stone, Fitz-John Porter, Henry Coppee, John P. Hatch, Edmund K. Smith, John W. Davidson, Delos B. Sacket, Barnard E. Bee, Gordon Granger, Thomas G. Pitcher, and others of more or less distinction. On graduation he was assigned to the Third Artillery, and after a brief service with it on the South Atlantic coast joined the Army of Mexico, under General Scott, and participated in all the battles and engagements of that bold and brilliant campaign from Vera Cruz to the Garitas of the capital of Mexico; receiving, although a subaltern of but two years service, the brevets of Captain and Major in the Army of the United States —the latter for "gallant conduct at Chepultepec." He was appointed Regimental Quartermaster, June 4, 1847, and held that position until October 24, 1848; in the meantime proceeding with his regiment from Mexico to Fort Monroe, Virginia, and thence to Fort Columbus, New York, whence, on the 15th of November. 1848, he embarked and sailed, in command of Company M, Third Artillery, and a detachment of Company F, Third Artillery, for Monterey, California; enthused, like his compagnons de myage. with the delightful anticipations and prospects of a life of wild adventure, with vast riches to be gathered in the new-found land of gold. Of his companions in the good ship Fanny Forrester— "the Horn around"—but two survive: the present Colonel of the Third Artillery, and. the late Colonel of the Fifth Artillery. Reaching Monterey on the 10th of April, 1849, with a sojourn of but a week at Valparaiso, he was ordered to San Francisco, and on the first day of May, 1849, relieved the dragoons under Captain A. J. Smith at the Presidio, and turned over his command to Captain E. D. Keyes. Soon after he was assigned to duty as Depot Commissary at Benicia, and in that capacity was long quartered on the goodly ship which had borne him safely to the golden shores—the Fanny Forester having been selected as the store-ship of the. Division of the Pacific. In October, 1853, he was transferred to Light Company C, Third Artillery, then commanded by Colonel Hraxton Bragg, and joined it at Fort Gibson, and there and served at Fort Washita until the spring of 1850, when he rejoined his regiment in California, and again became Depot Commissary, and in June, 1858, also Regimental Quartermaster. Promoted to Captain, October 12, 1858, he served with his company at Fort Vancouver (taking part in the expedition against the Snake River Indians in 1860), and in the spring of 1861 was assigned to duty at Alcatraces Island, whence he was transferred to the East to join the Army of the Potomac, under McClellan. But l>efore that army entered upon its peninsular campaign he was ordered to return to California, and there remained on duty until the final severence of the connection of his regiment with the golden land (which began in January, 1847) in October, 1865. After a short service at Fort Adams, Rhode Island, he was promoted Major Fifth Artillery, July 28, 1866, and served with that regiment in the South and East until his promotion as Lieutenant-Colonel Fourth Artillery, July 1, 1880, and on his transfer to the First Artillery, October 27, 1881, again returned to California, He there received his promotion, November 3, 1882, as Colonel of his old regiment, the Third Artillery, which position he held for one day, being transferred to the First Artillery, November 4, 1882, and with it remained on duty until his retirement, March 22, 1885; and at the golden gate of the golden land, which he entered in the golden days of '49, full of youth and strength and hope, his spirit passed to the golden gate of "a land that is fairer than day ".—than the sunlit land of El Dorado.

Others of his time have attained greater distinction, won prouder laurels in the profession of arms or literature; but in the former, in his mature years, the opportunity was denied him, and in the latter, brilliant as were his conceptions and utterances, he had not the genius for work—had never the gift of industry. But whilst the military service of his latter days did not fulfil the bright promise of his youth—his record in Mexico—yet as an officer of the line and staff, ever capable, he was diligent and faithful, and in the latter capacity of rare excellence. Warm-hearted, generous and genial, he won a host of friends, and Californians of "the days of old, the days of gold"—of ante-bellum, if not postbellum, days—will long remember his bright sallies of wit, his sparkling repartee, his inexhaustible fund of humor, and his merry, eccentric freaks and pranks, that ofttimes made the fun grow fast and furious. His readiness of wit, his brightness and felicity of expression—catching folly as it flies—was wonderful; and many B time John Phoenix paled his intellectual fires in his presence, and stole the bright flashes of wit almost from his very lips. Many a joyou.; table he set upon a roar; many a merry crowd he excited by his genial humor to the highest pitch of mirth, laughter and enjoyment. A facile pencil, as well as the pen of a ready writer, at times added force and point to the expression of his humor, but only on rare occasions would he resort to their use to point a moral or to adorn a tale of wit or fun. His early association with California left a marked impress on his character, deepened and broadened by longer and later sojourn in the golden land, and to the end of his days he was a genuine type of the real Californian of the olden time. Unselfish and generous, he accumulated little; brave and reckless, bold and resolute, he encountered many a hairbreadth escape or imminent peril; bright, convivial and genial, he was the most charming of boon companions; steadfast, sincere, honest and true, the most devoted of friends. When Fortune smiled, ever open-handed; when Fortune frowned, he used his diligence to give of that little left by the fickle dame at his disposal. His life was not in the odor of sanctity, but his virtues were many: even his failings had their charm; and laying up no treasures on earth, like Christian breasting the waves of the dark river, could lie not see the golden gates above as he passed from the golden gates below? He breathed his last in the land which he aided by his valor to acquire, beneath the flag which he followed to victory in Mexico—within the fortress walls that bear the name of the great chieftain of the nineteenth century, who, with his "graduated cadets," made as bold and brilliant campaign as that of Cortez and his followers in the sixteenth.

Colonel Andrews married, in October, 1854, at Fort Washita. Caroline Gooding, whose father was then an Indian trader on the Choctaw frontier. His eldest son, George E. Andrews, became a physician, and whilst employed in the army died quite recently at one of its stations in Arizona. Colonel Andrews' wife and two children survive him, in California.

The writer's acquaintance with George P. Andrews began in 1843, at West Point, and from 1848 to 1862—chiefly in Mexico and California—their association was intimate and almost constant. The separation begun by the war, save only for a few hours, when they met in New York in 1881, continued until his death. The order, reproduced from memory, which he represented to the writer as issued upon his retirement, is characteristic:

Headquarter s First Regiment Artillery,
Presidio Of San Francisco, March 22, 1885. j
Orders No. —
In obedience to instructions from the Adjutant-General of Army, the undersigned retires from active service.
GEORGE P. ANDREWS,
Colonel First Artillery.
N. B.—No flowers.

The flowers which he did not then desire, it is hoped, were not denied him when his casket was borne to the grave under the shadows of the Lone Mountain, there to mingle their hues and odors sweet with the brilliant flora of the hills and dales of the old Presidio, whose adobe walls oft resounded to his happy mirth, oft brightened by his merry wit, cheerful temper and brilliant humor.

H. G. Gibson.

After a Petition to the War Department by the Presidio Post Commander, Lieutenant Colonel George Pierce Andrews, General Order 133 was issued and established “a part of the reservation of the Presidio, including the Post Cemetery thereon to be known as the San Francisco National Cemetery”, and it was placed under the control of the Quartermaster General’s Office in 1884 as the first National Cemetery on the west coast.

July 1, 1845 graduated from West Point (15/41) and appointed brevet 2ndlt., 3rd U. S. Artillery Rgt.
Feb. 16, 1847 2ndlt.
June 4, 1847-Oct. 24, 1848 regimental quartermaster;
Sept. 8, 1847 1stlt.
Sept. 8, 1847 wounded at and brevet capt., U. S. Army for Molino del Rey Mexico;
Sept. 13, 1847 brevet maj., U. S. Army for Chapultepec Mexico;
June 1-Oct. 12, 1858 regimental quartermaster;
Oct. 12, 1858 capt.
1862-1865 served in California;
July 28, 1866 maj., 5th U. S. Artillery Rgt.
July 1, 1880 ltcol., 4th U. S. Artillery Rgt.
Oct. 27, 1881 transferred to 1st U. S. Artillery Rgt.
Nov. 3, 1882 col., 3rd U. S. Artillery Rgt.
Nov. 4, 1882 transferred to 1st U. S. Artillery Rgt.
March 22, 1885 retired

***

NECROLOGY from the

Nineteenth Annual Reunion of the Association of Graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York June 11th, 1888

East Saginaw, Mich.

Evening News and Binding House

1888

(found on Google Books as Annual Reunion By United States Military Academy. Association of Graduates)

GEORGE P. ANDREWS
No. 1245. Class Of 1845.
Died, July 2, 1887, at Fort Winfield Scott, Cal., aged 66.

On the second ultimo there died at Fort Point, in the harbor of San Francisco, a soldier and citizen—of local and army fame scarcely commensurate with his admirable traits and gifts of character and mind; a soldier who, whilst yet a youth, won exceptional distinction on the classic fields of Mexico, but whom Fate, nevertheless, destined to bear an inactive part in a war more sanguinary and cruel, but no more brilliant with deeds of heroism and valor; a citizen who, for nigh onto forty years, had been identified by association, interest and service with the progress and development of the Golden State; and who, in the marked features of his character—virtues and failings—was a true representative of the early pioneers of California. A humorist, as keen, as brilliant, as delightful as John Phoenix (who ofttimes stole his thunder), or any of the bright essayists in wit and humor, whose creations and fancies, inspired and developed amid the golden scenes and events of California, have charmed the literary world.

George Pierce Andrews was born in the State of Connecticut, in the year 1821. His father, a physician by profession, emigrated, a few years later, to Goldsboro, North Carolina, where his children were educated, and from which State George Andrews was appointed, in 1841, to West Point. He was graduated therefrom in the class of 1845, whose roll embraces the names of William Ft. C. Whiting, William F. Smith, Thomas J. Wood. Charles P. Stone, Fitz-John Porter, Henry Coppee, John P. Hatch, Edmund K. Smith, John W. Davidson, Delos B. Sacket, Barnard E. Bee, Gordon Granger, Thomas G. Pitcher, and others of more or less distinction. On graduation he was assigned to the Third Artillery, and after a brief service with it on the South Atlantic coast joined the Army of Mexico, under General Scott, and participated in all the battles and engagements of that bold and brilliant campaign from Vera Cruz to the Garitas of the capital of Mexico; receiving, although a subaltern of but two years service, the brevets of Captain and Major in the Army of the United States —the latter for "gallant conduct at Chepultepec." He was appointed Regimental Quartermaster, June 4, 1847, and held that position until October 24, 1848; in the meantime proceeding with his regiment from Mexico to Fort Monroe, Virginia, and thence to Fort Columbus, New York, whence, on the 15th of November. 1848, he embarked and sailed, in command of Company M, Third Artillery, and a detachment of Company F, Third Artillery, for Monterey, California; enthused, like his compagnons de myage. with the delightful anticipations and prospects of a life of wild adventure, with vast riches to be gathered in the new-found land of gold. Of his companions in the good ship Fanny Forrester— "the Horn around"—but two survive: the present Colonel of the Third Artillery, and. the late Colonel of the Fifth Artillery. Reaching Monterey on the 10th of April, 1849, with a sojourn of but a week at Valparaiso, he was ordered to San Francisco, and on the first day of May, 1849, relieved the dragoons under Captain A. J. Smith at the Presidio, and turned over his command to Captain E. D. Keyes. Soon after he was assigned to duty as Depot Commissary at Benicia, and in that capacity was long quartered on the goodly ship which had borne him safely to the golden shores—the Fanny Forester having been selected as the store-ship of the. Division of the Pacific. In October, 1853, he was transferred to Light Company C, Third Artillery, then commanded by Colonel Hraxton Bragg, and joined it at Fort Gibson, and there and served at Fort Washita until the spring of 1850, when he rejoined his regiment in California, and again became Depot Commissary, and in June, 1858, also Regimental Quartermaster. Promoted to Captain, October 12, 1858, he served with his company at Fort Vancouver (taking part in the expedition against the Snake River Indians in 1860), and in the spring of 1861 was assigned to duty at Alcatraces Island, whence he was transferred to the East to join the Army of the Potomac, under McClellan. But l>efore that army entered upon its peninsular campaign he was ordered to return to California, and there remained on duty until the final severence of the connection of his regiment with the golden land (which began in January, 1847) in October, 1865. After a short service at Fort Adams, Rhode Island, he was promoted Major Fifth Artillery, July 28, 1866, and served with that regiment in the South and East until his promotion as Lieutenant-Colonel Fourth Artillery, July 1, 1880, and on his transfer to the First Artillery, October 27, 1881, again returned to California, He there received his promotion, November 3, 1882, as Colonel of his old regiment, the Third Artillery, which position he held for one day, being transferred to the First Artillery, November 4, 1882, and with it remained on duty until his retirement, March 22, 1885; and at the golden gate of the golden land, which he entered in the golden days of '49, full of youth and strength and hope, his spirit passed to the golden gate of "a land that is fairer than day ".—than the sunlit land of El Dorado.

Others of his time have attained greater distinction, won prouder laurels in the profession of arms or literature; but in the former, in his mature years, the opportunity was denied him, and in the latter, brilliant as were his conceptions and utterances, he had not the genius for work—had never the gift of industry. But whilst the military service of his latter days did not fulfil the bright promise of his youth—his record in Mexico—yet as an officer of the line and staff, ever capable, he was diligent and faithful, and in the latter capacity of rare excellence. Warm-hearted, generous and genial, he won a host of friends, and Californians of "the days of old, the days of gold"—of ante-bellum, if not postbellum, days—will long remember his bright sallies of wit, his sparkling repartee, his inexhaustible fund of humor, and his merry, eccentric freaks and pranks, that ofttimes made the fun grow fast and furious. His readiness of wit, his brightness and felicity of expression—catching folly as it flies—was wonderful; and many B time John Phoenix paled his intellectual fires in his presence, and stole the bright flashes of wit almost from his very lips. Many a joyou.; table he set upon a roar; many a merry crowd he excited by his genial humor to the highest pitch of mirth, laughter and enjoyment. A facile pencil, as well as the pen of a ready writer, at times added force and point to the expression of his humor, but only on rare occasions would he resort to their use to point a moral or to adorn a tale of wit or fun. His early association with California left a marked impress on his character, deepened and broadened by longer and later sojourn in the golden land, and to the end of his days he was a genuine type of the real Californian of the olden time. Unselfish and generous, he accumulated little; brave and reckless, bold and resolute, he encountered many a hairbreadth escape or imminent peril; bright, convivial and genial, he was the most charming of boon companions; steadfast, sincere, honest and true, the most devoted of friends. When Fortune smiled, ever open-handed; when Fortune frowned, he used his diligence to give of that little left by the fickle dame at his disposal. His life was not in the odor of sanctity, but his virtues were many: even his failings had their charm; and laying up no treasures on earth, like Christian breasting the waves of the dark river, could lie not see the golden gates above as he passed from the golden gates below? He breathed his last in the land which he aided by his valor to acquire, beneath the flag which he followed to victory in Mexico—within the fortress walls that bear the name of the great chieftain of the nineteenth century, who, with his "graduated cadets," made as bold and brilliant campaign as that of Cortez and his followers in the sixteenth.

Colonel Andrews married, in October, 1854, at Fort Washita. Caroline Gooding, whose father was then an Indian trader on the Choctaw frontier. His eldest son, George E. Andrews, became a physician, and whilst employed in the army died quite recently at one of its stations in Arizona. Colonel Andrews' wife and two children survive him, in California.

The writer's acquaintance with George P. Andrews began in 1843, at West Point, and from 1848 to 1862—chiefly in Mexico and California—their association was intimate and almost constant. The separation begun by the war, save only for a few hours, when they met in New York in 1881, continued until his death. The order, reproduced from memory, which he represented to the writer as issued upon his retirement, is characteristic:

Headquarter s First Regiment Artillery,
Presidio Of San Francisco, March 22, 1885. j
Orders No. —
In obedience to instructions from the Adjutant-General of Army, the undersigned retires from active service.
GEORGE P. ANDREWS,
Colonel First Artillery.
N. B.—No flowers.

The flowers which he did not then desire, it is hoped, were not denied him when his casket was borne to the grave under the shadows of the Lone Mountain, there to mingle their hues and odors sweet with the brilliant flora of the hills and dales of the old Presidio, whose adobe walls oft resounded to his happy mirth, oft brightened by his merry wit, cheerful temper and brilliant humor.

H. G. Gibson.

After a Petition to the War Department by the Presidio Post Commander, Lieutenant Colonel George Pierce Andrews, General Order 133 was issued and established “a part of the reservation of the Presidio, including the Post Cemetery thereon to be known as the San Francisco National Cemetery”, and it was placed under the control of the Quartermaster General’s Office in 1884 as the first National Cemetery on the west coast.


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