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Capt James William Fitzwilliam

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Capt James William Fitzwilliam

Birth
Coolgreany, County Wexford, Ireland
Death
19 May 1893 (aged 56)
Bastrop, Bastrop County, Texas, USA
Burial
Bastrop, Bastrop County, Texas, USA
Plot
G-11-19
Memorial ID
34866993 View Source

This is my Great Great Grandfather.

Most of the information in this bio comes from the book: The Fitzwilliam, O'Brien and Watson Families: History and Genealogy by Dorothy Garesché Holland, January 1973

Son of: James Fitzwilliam and Bridget Doyle Fitzwilliam

Brother of Thomas Fitzwilliam, John Fitzwilliam, Michael Fitzwilliam, Matthew Fitzwilliam, Denis John Fitzwilliam, Mary Fitzwilliam and Patrick Fitzwilliam and Brien Fitzwilliam.

Husband of: Nancy Cartwright and Mrs. Ida Walker Harris

He and Nancy Cartwright Fitzwilliam are the parents of: James Henry Fitzwilliam, John David Fitzwilliam, Alice Fitzwilliam Fowler, who preceded him in death in 1888, Nancy Fitzwilliam and Francis Fitzwilliam McPhaul. The 1880 census at Fitzwilliam's Mill, Bastrop County, Texas also shows a Samuel Fitzwilliam age 9. He must have died between 1880 and 1893.

Immigration: He came to America with his family aboard the "Millicete." The ship sailed from Liverpool in October 1850 and arrived in New Orleans on 2 January 1851. His father died at sea on the trip over. Their mother , Bridget Doyle Fitzwilliam, went directly to Charity Hospital in New Orleans with "typhus fever". She died January 31, 1851. Bridget's brother, Michael James Doyle came from Austin to help place the children. James "went to Fort Smith, Arkansas, where one of his mother's relatives, James Clifford, lived, and where he became apprenticed as a carpenter and mill-wright." (Census records indicate that he was actually a blacksmith) (We can not at this time CONFIRM that actual family that he was living with...family letters indicate that he was sent to live with James Clifford....but it could also be James Clifford Doyle. I tend to lean toward James Clifford simply because he was a blacksmith, as was James William Fitzwilliam in the 1860 census)

In 1859, in Fort Smith, Arkansas, he married Nancy Cartwright

The 1860 census lists him as a blacksmith in Fort Smith, Sebastian County, Arkansas

"When the Civil War began he joined the Confederate forces as a private and in 1862 he sent Nancy and the two babies to her brother in Austin, Texas. He has a long record of heroic fighting"... ..."Because of his leadership, ability as a rider and markmanship he became known as the "Marion of the Confederacy." His tactics were of guerilla warfare, hit and run."

When the war ended, he and his family settled in Bastrop, Texas. In 1867, Captain James Fitzwilliam purchased the Aldridge Property which had a house on it built 1852-1853 using slave labor. About 1872, Captain James enlarged the home and added a second story. He called the house "WEXFORD" after the town in Ireland where he was born. The home was dedicated a Texas Historic Ladmark in 1968. (Aldridge-Fitzwilliam Home Marker # 5021009146).

"He farmed and raised cattle on the ranch, and derived much entertainment by refighting Civil War Battles with two old friends and neighbors, Captain Morgan, a Methodist minister who was not allowed to shoot a man in battle but who could carry a sword, and Joseph Sayers, ( Find A Grave Memorial# 19690) later U.S. Senator and governor of Texas, for which two men his grandson was named."

-------------------
His Obituary appeared in the Bastrop Advertizer on Saturday sept 27, 1893
OBITUARY

DIED: - At his residence near Bastrop, Texas, May 20, 1893, James William Fitzwilliam.

He was born March 10th, 1837, in Coolgranny, Wexford County, Ireland. His father emigrated in 1849, but dying on the voyage to the United States, James W. came with his mother to New Orleans, Louisiana, where she died in 1850. In 1851 he went to Fort Smith, Arkansas, where he worked at the trade of blacksmith with his uncle, James Clifford, and where, in 1859, he married Nancy Cartwright. In 1861 he enlisted as a private in the Confederate army, served during the war, and at its close held the rank of Captain. Soon after the war he came to Austin, Texas, but in a short time engaged with the Messrs. Williams in constructing and operating a saw mill in Bastrop County. In 1867, he purchased and settled upon the Aldridge farm, his late residence, and engaged actively and successfully in farming and stock raising. On the 10 of June, 1887, his wife died. Four children, James H, J. D., Nancy and Fannie, survive them.

In 1889 Capt. Fitzwilliam married Mrs. Ida Harris, nee Walker, who survives him.

Such is a brief sketch of the life of one of the most enterprising successful and useful citizens of Bastrop County. He did not seek office, but as a county commissioner, accepted office as a duty and rendered faithful and valuable service to the county.

At thirteen years of age, an orphan, without patrimony, he engaged in that struggle of life with a courage that triumphed over adversity and leaves an example for the emulation of all who would succeed by merits and deserve the plaudits of mankind. Integrity, Industry and frugality were rewarded with Honor and Plenty - his integrity inspiring respect, and his industry and frugality securing competence. As citizen and soldier he was without reproach - and few, indeed, have gone hence forever, so much esteemed and lamented by those who knew them as James William Fitzwilliam."
G. W. JONES
(G.W. Jones: Find A Grave Memorial# 7784601)

----------------------------------------

I wish to thank my newly discovered Cousins John Fitzwilliam and Mike Fitzwilliam for providing the picture of Wexford and additional details regarding their immigration and Marjorie Watson Fitzwilliam for providing a copy of the obituary! Yall are a REAL blessing! and I'm glad to have found yall!!

I would also like to thank "LSW" for the taking the time to photograph the tombstones of this family and posting the pictures for us. We appreciate it so much!!

This is my Great Great Grandfather.

Most of the information in this bio comes from the book: The Fitzwilliam, O'Brien and Watson Families: History and Genealogy by Dorothy Garesché Holland, January 1973

Son of: James Fitzwilliam and Bridget Doyle Fitzwilliam

Brother of Thomas Fitzwilliam, John Fitzwilliam, Michael Fitzwilliam, Matthew Fitzwilliam, Denis John Fitzwilliam, Mary Fitzwilliam and Patrick Fitzwilliam and Brien Fitzwilliam.

Husband of: Nancy Cartwright and Mrs. Ida Walker Harris

He and Nancy Cartwright Fitzwilliam are the parents of: James Henry Fitzwilliam, John David Fitzwilliam, Alice Fitzwilliam Fowler, who preceded him in death in 1888, Nancy Fitzwilliam and Francis Fitzwilliam McPhaul. The 1880 census at Fitzwilliam's Mill, Bastrop County, Texas also shows a Samuel Fitzwilliam age 9. He must have died between 1880 and 1893.

Immigration: He came to America with his family aboard the "Millicete." The ship sailed from Liverpool in October 1850 and arrived in New Orleans on 2 January 1851. His father died at sea on the trip over. Their mother , Bridget Doyle Fitzwilliam, went directly to Charity Hospital in New Orleans with "typhus fever". She died January 31, 1851. Bridget's brother, Michael James Doyle came from Austin to help place the children. James "went to Fort Smith, Arkansas, where one of his mother's relatives, James Clifford, lived, and where he became apprenticed as a carpenter and mill-wright." (Census records indicate that he was actually a blacksmith) (We can not at this time CONFIRM that actual family that he was living with...family letters indicate that he was sent to live with James Clifford....but it could also be James Clifford Doyle. I tend to lean toward James Clifford simply because he was a blacksmith, as was James William Fitzwilliam in the 1860 census)

In 1859, in Fort Smith, Arkansas, he married Nancy Cartwright

The 1860 census lists him as a blacksmith in Fort Smith, Sebastian County, Arkansas

"When the Civil War began he joined the Confederate forces as a private and in 1862 he sent Nancy and the two babies to her brother in Austin, Texas. He has a long record of heroic fighting"... ..."Because of his leadership, ability as a rider and markmanship he became known as the "Marion of the Confederacy." His tactics were of guerilla warfare, hit and run."

When the war ended, he and his family settled in Bastrop, Texas. In 1867, Captain James Fitzwilliam purchased the Aldridge Property which had a house on it built 1852-1853 using slave labor. About 1872, Captain James enlarged the home and added a second story. He called the house "WEXFORD" after the town in Ireland where he was born. The home was dedicated a Texas Historic Ladmark in 1968. (Aldridge-Fitzwilliam Home Marker # 5021009146).

"He farmed and raised cattle on the ranch, and derived much entertainment by refighting Civil War Battles with two old friends and neighbors, Captain Morgan, a Methodist minister who was not allowed to shoot a man in battle but who could carry a sword, and Joseph Sayers, ( Find A Grave Memorial# 19690) later U.S. Senator and governor of Texas, for which two men his grandson was named."

-------------------
His Obituary appeared in the Bastrop Advertizer on Saturday sept 27, 1893
OBITUARY

DIED: - At his residence near Bastrop, Texas, May 20, 1893, James William Fitzwilliam.

He was born March 10th, 1837, in Coolgranny, Wexford County, Ireland. His father emigrated in 1849, but dying on the voyage to the United States, James W. came with his mother to New Orleans, Louisiana, where she died in 1850. In 1851 he went to Fort Smith, Arkansas, where he worked at the trade of blacksmith with his uncle, James Clifford, and where, in 1859, he married Nancy Cartwright. In 1861 he enlisted as a private in the Confederate army, served during the war, and at its close held the rank of Captain. Soon after the war he came to Austin, Texas, but in a short time engaged with the Messrs. Williams in constructing and operating a saw mill in Bastrop County. In 1867, he purchased and settled upon the Aldridge farm, his late residence, and engaged actively and successfully in farming and stock raising. On the 10 of June, 1887, his wife died. Four children, James H, J. D., Nancy and Fannie, survive them.

In 1889 Capt. Fitzwilliam married Mrs. Ida Harris, nee Walker, who survives him.

Such is a brief sketch of the life of one of the most enterprising successful and useful citizens of Bastrop County. He did not seek office, but as a county commissioner, accepted office as a duty and rendered faithful and valuable service to the county.

At thirteen years of age, an orphan, without patrimony, he engaged in that struggle of life with a courage that triumphed over adversity and leaves an example for the emulation of all who would succeed by merits and deserve the plaudits of mankind. Integrity, Industry and frugality were rewarded with Honor and Plenty - his integrity inspiring respect, and his industry and frugality securing competence. As citizen and soldier he was without reproach - and few, indeed, have gone hence forever, so much esteemed and lamented by those who knew them as James William Fitzwilliam."
G. W. JONES
(G.W. Jones: Find A Grave Memorial# 7784601)

----------------------------------------

I wish to thank my newly discovered Cousins John Fitzwilliam and Mike Fitzwilliam for providing the picture of Wexford and additional details regarding their immigration and Marjorie Watson Fitzwilliam for providing a copy of the obituary! Yall are a REAL blessing! and I'm glad to have found yall!!

I would also like to thank "LSW" for the taking the time to photograph the tombstones of this family and posting the pictures for us. We appreciate it so much!!


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