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Capt Jahaziel Sherman

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Capt Jahaziel Sherman

Birth
Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, USA
Death
31 Oct 1844 (aged 74)
Vergennes, Addison County, Vermont, USA
Burial
Vergennes, Addison County, Vermont, USA
Memorial ID
34515039 View Source

From Thomas Hawley Canfield, "Discovery, Navigation and Navigators of Lake Champlain," Vermont Historical Gazeteer edited by Abby Maria Hemenway. (Burlington, 1867), pp. 656-706

CAPT. JEHAZIEL SHERMAN.

Born at Dartmouth, Mass., 28th July, 1770. He removed from Dartmouth to Bath (opposite Albany) in 1793, where he took command of a vessel called the Favorite, owned by Wm. and Jeremiah Clarke, merchants of Bath; he soon after purchased and took command of a vessel called the Anna, on the Hudson River plying between Albany and New York, and continued in command of her until 1805, having previously removed to Albany, and in 1802, in Dec., entered into partnership with S. P. Jermain, at Albany, in the mercantile business, Mr. Jermain taking charge of the business on shore and Capt. S. continuing in command of the vessel, and in the year 1805 Capt. Sherman built, at New Baltimore, for the firm of Jermain & Sherman, the then celebrated sloop Oneida Chief, the largest and finest vessel on the Hudson, and commanded by Capt. Sherman for five years, and part of the time she was run exclusively for passengers between New York and Albany, — this was previous to steam navigation on the Hudson, which commenced in 1809, and, in 1810, the passenger packet business was abandoned and the firm of Jermain and Sherman dissolved. Capt. S. then purchased the sloop Lion, which he commanded about two years, and in 1812 he received from the Albany Steamboat Company the appointment to the command of the steam-boat Perseverance, which with the steamboat Hope, Capt. Elisha Bunker, the Albany Co. placed on the Hudson in opposition to Fulton, and Livingston, they having the patent and exclusive right of navigating the Hudson with steam. Messrs. Fulton and Livingston obtained an injunction against the Albany Co., and the Hope and Perseverance were laid up until a compromise with Fulton and Livingston giving the Albany Co. the exclusive right of navigating Lake Champlain with steam, and in May, 1814, Capt. Sherman left Albany for Lake Champlain, landing at Vergennes, and bringing with him the engine of the steamboat Perseverance, to be placed in a vessel on the Lake. He immediately commenced the building of a steamboat at Vergennes, which before completed was seized (in the stocks) by Com. Macdonough, for the Government, and converted into an armed vessel and which did good service in the memorable engagement on Lake Champlain.

In the summer of 1814, Capt. Sherman, at Vergennes, commenced the building of the steamboat Phœnix, and which he commanded until a short time previous to her being destroyed by fire, as before related.

In 1821, Capt. Sherman built for the Lake Champlain Steamboat Co., at Vergennes, a boat which was also called the Phœnix, and which he commanded until the year 1824, when he was called to New York to superintend the building of a boat called the Chief Justice Marshall for the Troy Steamboat Co., and in 1826 Capt. Sherman was called to St. Albans to superintend the building of a steamer called the Franklin for the Cham. Trans. Co., and which he commanded the year 1827, and at the close of the year he resigned this command and retired from the lake, still retaining his interest in the Cham. Trans. Co., and in which he was for many years one of the directors. Capt. S. for many years was engaged in the steamboat business of Lake George, and superintended the building of the steamers Mountaineer and Wm. Caldwell on that Lake, in the business of which as well as that of Lake Champlain, he took a deep interest until the time of his death which took place at Vergennes, 31st Oct., 1844.

From Thomas Hawley Canfield, "Discovery, Navigation and Navigators of Lake Champlain," Vermont Historical Gazeteer edited by Abby Maria Hemenway. (Burlington, 1867), pp. 656-706

CAPT. JEHAZIEL SHERMAN.

Born at Dartmouth, Mass., 28th July, 1770. He removed from Dartmouth to Bath (opposite Albany) in 1793, where he took command of a vessel called the Favorite, owned by Wm. and Jeremiah Clarke, merchants of Bath; he soon after purchased and took command of a vessel called the Anna, on the Hudson River plying between Albany and New York, and continued in command of her until 1805, having previously removed to Albany, and in 1802, in Dec., entered into partnership with S. P. Jermain, at Albany, in the mercantile business, Mr. Jermain taking charge of the business on shore and Capt. S. continuing in command of the vessel, and in the year 1805 Capt. Sherman built, at New Baltimore, for the firm of Jermain & Sherman, the then celebrated sloop Oneida Chief, the largest and finest vessel on the Hudson, and commanded by Capt. Sherman for five years, and part of the time she was run exclusively for passengers between New York and Albany, — this was previous to steam navigation on the Hudson, which commenced in 1809, and, in 1810, the passenger packet business was abandoned and the firm of Jermain and Sherman dissolved. Capt. S. then purchased the sloop Lion, which he commanded about two years, and in 1812 he received from the Albany Steamboat Company the appointment to the command of the steam-boat Perseverance, which with the steamboat Hope, Capt. Elisha Bunker, the Albany Co. placed on the Hudson in opposition to Fulton, and Livingston, they having the patent and exclusive right of navigating the Hudson with steam. Messrs. Fulton and Livingston obtained an injunction against the Albany Co., and the Hope and Perseverance were laid up until a compromise with Fulton and Livingston giving the Albany Co. the exclusive right of navigating Lake Champlain with steam, and in May, 1814, Capt. Sherman left Albany for Lake Champlain, landing at Vergennes, and bringing with him the engine of the steamboat Perseverance, to be placed in a vessel on the Lake. He immediately commenced the building of a steamboat at Vergennes, which before completed was seized (in the stocks) by Com. Macdonough, for the Government, and converted into an armed vessel and which did good service in the memorable engagement on Lake Champlain.

In the summer of 1814, Capt. Sherman, at Vergennes, commenced the building of the steamboat Phœnix, and which he commanded until a short time previous to her being destroyed by fire, as before related.

In 1821, Capt. Sherman built for the Lake Champlain Steamboat Co., at Vergennes, a boat which was also called the Phœnix, and which he commanded until the year 1824, when he was called to New York to superintend the building of a boat called the Chief Justice Marshall for the Troy Steamboat Co., and in 1826 Capt. Sherman was called to St. Albans to superintend the building of a steamer called the Franklin for the Cham. Trans. Co., and which he commanded the year 1827, and at the close of the year he resigned this command and retired from the lake, still retaining his interest in the Cham. Trans. Co., and in which he was for many years one of the directors. Capt. S. for many years was engaged in the steamboat business of Lake George, and superintended the building of the steamers Mountaineer and Wm. Caldwell on that Lake, in the business of which as well as that of Lake Champlain, he took a deep interest until the time of his death which took place at Vergennes, 31st Oct., 1844.


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  • Created by: Elaine
  • Added: 6 Mar 2009
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 34515039
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/34515039/jahaziel-sherman: accessed ), memorial page for Capt Jahaziel Sherman (28 Jul 1770–31 Oct 1844), Find a Grave Memorial ID 34515039, citing Vergennes Burying Ground, Vergennes, Addison County, Vermont, USA; Maintained by Elaine (contributor 46893309) .